01.06.2019

# Media

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Vox: The climate renegade. What happens when someone wants to go it alone on fixing the climate?

"Enter an eccentric San Francisco-based entrepreneur named Russ George. He had spent much of his career bouncing between ambitious environmental projects: cold fusion, reforestation, and, most recently at the time, a startup called Planktos, which focused on something called 'ocean restoration.'"

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22.04.2019

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Digital Trends: Geoengineering is risky and unproven, but soon it might be necessary

"Imagine the azure blue skies of summer fading to a hazy white as light-scattering aerosols are injected into Earth’s upper atmosphere. Imagine a planet covered with giant artificial chemical sponges leeching gases out of the air that we breathe. Imagine filling the Earth’s oceans with millions of pounds of calcium bicarbonate to alter the levels of acidification."

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01.04.2019

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Junge Welt: Capitalist climate plumber (German)

German article on CE

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21.03.2019

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NZZ: A Swiss resolution on geoengineering fails because of the polarization of the debate (German)

German article on CE

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13.03.2019

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The Guardian: Radical plan to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, study finds

"A new study contradicts fears that using solar geoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world."

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13.03.2019

# New Publications

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Irvine, P.; et al. (2019): Halving warming with idealized solar geoengineering moderates key climate hazards

Irvine, P.; Emanuel, K.; He, J.; Horowitz, L.; Vecchi, G.; Keith, D. (2019): Halving warming with idealized solar geoengineering moderates key climate hazards. In: Nature Climate change. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0398-8.

"Solar geoengineering (SG) has the potential to restore average surface temperatures by increasing planetary albedo, but this could reduce precipitation. Thus, although SG might reduce globally aggregated risks, it may increase climate risks for some regions. Here, using the high-resolution forecast-oriented low ocean resolution (HiFLOR) model—which resolves tropical cyclones and has an improved representation of present-day precipitation extremesalongside 12 models from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), we analyse the fraction of locations that see their local climate change exacerbated or moderated by SG. Rather than restoring temperatures, we assume that SG is applied to halve the warming produced by doubling CO2 (half-SG)."

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17.12.2018

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The National: Scientists aim to dim the sun to tackle climate change

"Scientists are preparing to test a radical new way of tackling climate change by deliberately dimming the sun. A team of researchers from Harvard University plans to release a balloon into the skies over the southwest United States in the new year. Once it reaches an altitude of 20km, the balloon will release a chalky material to bounce the sun’s heat back into space. Only a tiny amount of material will be released, and the effects will be limited to a few square kilometres. Even so, the experiment has reignited concern about such “geoengineering” solutions to tackling climate change."

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03.12.2018

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Der Tagesspiegel: It does not work without geoengineering (German)

German article on CE.

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21.11.2018

# New Publications

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Harding, A.; et al. (2018): The economics of geoengineering

Harding, A.; Moreno-Cruz, J. (2018): The economics of geoengineering. In: Letcher T. (ed.): MANAGING GLOBAL WARMING. An interface of technology and human issues. [S.l.]: ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS, S. 729–750.

"Geoengineering provides an alternative strategy from abatement to counteract or mask impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Geoengineering strategies can be classified as either solar radiation management (SRM) or carbon dioxide removal (CDR). SRM strategies are cheap, quick, but imperfect. CDR strategies are expensive, slow, but perfect and can generate negative net emissions. High abatement costs and shared global benefits have created a free-rider problem, but properties of geoengineering have the potential to disrupt that impasse. Geoengineering can also introduce new problems through additional risks and uncertainties. Even if the use of geoengineering is found to be optimal, strategic decision making may produce suboptimal outcomes. Over the past decade, research has examined if geoengineering is a serious alternative and when the benefits of using it outweigh the costs."

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19.11.2018

# Media

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InTheseTimes: To Block Out the Sun

"But more dramatic approaches have crept into policy discussions, like solar radiation management, known as SRM. First imagined by scientists during the Cold War, SRM promises a comparatively cheap, quick fix: the continuous dispersal of aerosols into the atmosphere to reflect and absorb sunlight, cooling the planet. In effect, SRM means dimming the sun."

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