01.08.2018

# Media

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Forbes: How Much Sea Level Rise Is Actually Locked in?

"Under the lowest of the IPCC’s four scenarios, RCP2.6, peak temperature rise of 2 degrees C will be reached before 2100, and sea level rise will be less than about a half meter. However, due to lag effects in ocean warming and ice melt, sea level will continue to rise for centuries. Rise can theoretically be reduced by negative carbon emissions or geoengineering."

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30.07.2018

# New Publications

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Irvine, Peter J.; et al. (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts

Irvine, Peter J.; Keith, David W.; Moore, John (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts. In: The Cryosphere 12 (7), S. 2501–2513. DOI: 10.5194/tc-12-2501-2018.

"Here we review the literature on solar geoengineering and the cryosphere and identify the key uncertainties that research could address. Solar geoengineering may be more effective at reducing surface melt than a reduction in greenhouse forcing that produces the same global-average temperature response. Studies of natural analogues and model simulations support this conclusion."

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26.07.2018

# New Publications

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Wolovick, Michael J.; et al. (2018): Stopping the Flood. Could We Use Targeted Geoengineering to Mitigate Sea Level Rise?

Wolovick, Michael J.; Moore, John C. (2018): Stopping the Flood. Could We Use Targeted Geoengineering to Mitigate Sea Level Rise? In: The Cryosphere Discuss., S. 1–20. DOI: 10.5194/tc-2018-95.

"Here, we use a suite of coupled ice–ocean flowband simulations to explore whether targeted geoengineering using an artificial sill or artificial ice rises could counter a collapse. Successful interventions occur when the floating ice shelf regrounds on the pinning points, increasing buttressing and reducing ice flux across the grounding line. Regrounding is more likely with a continuous sill that is able to block warm water transport to the grounding line."

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15.06.2018

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The New York Times Newsletter: Could Earth’s Ice Sheets Collapse?

"If just the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets melted completely, global sea levels would rise by more than 30 feet."

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29.03.2018

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Environmental Reserach Web: Could targeted geoengineering cut sea-level rise?

"Targeted geoengineering to preserve continental ice sheets deserves serious research and investment, according to a comment in Nature. "We understand the hesitancy to interfere with glaciers – as glaciologists, we know the pristine beauty of these places," wrote John Moore of Beijing Normal University, China, and the University of Lapland, Finland, and colleagues. "But we have also stood on ice shelves that are now open ocean.""

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24.03.2018

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Clean Technica: Scientists Propose Geoengineering Projects To Control Rising Sea Levels

"If you don’t believe in climate science, then everything is rosy. We can just continue doing what we have been doing and everything will be fine. Most of us who participate in the CleanTechnica community believe the world is warming, that human activity is largely responsible for the increase in global average temperatures, and that we have a duty to mitigate the changes those higher temperatures will cause. Part of those mitigation strategies may include targeted geoengineering projects to protect against rising sea levels."

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26.01.2018

# New Publications

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Irvine, Peter J.; et al. (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts

Irvine, Peter J.; Keith, David W.; Moore, John (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts. In The Cryosphere Discuss., pp. 1–15. DOI: 10.5194/tc-2017-279.

"Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, a form of solar geoengineering, is a proposal to add a reflective layer of aerosol to the stratosphere to reduce net radiative forcing and so to reduce the risks of climate change. Solar geoengineering could reduce temperatures and so slow melt, but the efficacy of solar geoengineering at offsetting changes to the cryosphere is uncertain. For example, shortwave forcing acts more strongly on the surface than longwave forcing so solar geoengineering would reduce surface melt more effectively but would also suppress the global hydrological cycle potentially reducing accumulation on glaciers."

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31.07.2016

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Rolling Stone: Can New York Be Saved in the Era of Global Warming?

"But the truth is, barring deployment of a radical geoengineering scheme that quickly cools the planet, we have already heated up the Earth's atmosphere enough to guarantee that the seas are going to rise – and they are going to keep rising for a long time. Recent studies have shown that even if we stabilize the greenhouse-gas emissions at today's levels, the oceans will still rise by as much as 70 feet in the coming centuries and stay that high for thousands of years. In that scenario, New York will become an archipelago on the coast, with the high ground of Upper Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn and Staten Island just above the waterline."

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11.03.2016

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International Business Times: Geoengineering: Pumping water onto Antarctica will not stop sea levels rising

Media response on Frieler, K.; et al. (2016). "Unprecedented geoengineering methods will not be enough to solve the problem of rising sea levels, scientists have warned. A team from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research has assessed the idea of pumping sea water onto the Antarctic continent to see if it would be technically feasible, and if it could be of any help to tackle one of the immense challenges associated with global warming."

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11.03.2016

# New Publications

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Frieler, K.; et al. (2016): Delaying future sea-level rise by storing water in Antarctica

Frieler, K.; Mengel, M.; Levermann, A. (2016): Delaying future sea-level rise by storing water in Antarctica. In Earth Syst. Dynam. 7 (1), pp. 203–210. DOI 10.5194/esd-7-203-2016.

"In view of the potential implications for coastal populations and ecosystems worldwide, we investigate, from an ice-dynamic perspective, the possibility of delaying sea-level rise by pumping ocean water onto the surface of the Antarctic ice sheet. We find that due to wave propagation ice is discharged much faster back into the ocean than would be expected from a pure advection with surface velocities."

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