18.10.2021

# New Publications

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Ferreira, Vera; et al. (2021): Stakeholders' perceptions of appropriate nature-based solutions in the urban context

Ferreira, Vera; Barreira, Ana Paula; Loures, Luís; Antunes, Dulce; Panagopoulos, Thomas (2021): Stakeholders' perceptions of appropriate nature-based solutions in the urban context. In Journal of environmental management 298, p. 113502. DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.113502.

"The concept of nature-based solutions (NBSs) has become increasingly popular among urban policymakers and planners to help them tackle the urban challenges arising from urban expansion and climate change. Stakeholders' involvement is a fundamental step, and stakeholders' perceptions and preferences can affect the development of NBS projects. This study aims to identify stakeholders' perceptions of the most critical urban challenges, the priority interventions, the preferred NBSs and the benefits of the NBSs, and to identify the determinants of these perceptions. A survey was administered to assess stakeholders' perceptions and views on implementing NBSs in two Portuguese cities with distinct urban, geographical, and socio-economic contexts. A binary logistic regression model was used to understand the determinants of the likelihood of the stakeholders’ answers. According to the stakeholders, climate change is one of the main concerns in the urban context. It is usually associated with the incidence of heatwaves and water scarcity. Additionally, stakeholders are concerned about the low quantity and poor management of green spaces (GSs). They believe that it will be necessary to increase the GS, to recover some degraded areas, and to increase mobility. The preferred NBSs were planting more urban trees, making green shaded areas, and rehabilitating riverbanks. The main expected benefits were benefits for leisure and relaxation, reductions in air temperature, purer air, and improvements in public health. The results showed mostly coherent connections between the main concerns/priorities of the stakeholders and the perceived NBS benefits; however, some stakeholders did not present coherent connections, indicating low awareness of the current policy for implementing NBSs to overcome existing and future urban challenges."

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30.09.2021

# Media

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Tin Fischer: #TrillionTrees

"Why do Jane Goodall or Marc Benioff think that the world needs a #TrillionTrees? It's a weird story about made up figures, an inspiring German, a flawed study, and a media frenzy. It all begins in 2013, with a boy’s speech in the UN assembly hall"

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03.09.2021

# New Publications

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Wenger, Ariane; et al. (2021): Public perception and acceptance of negative emission technologies – framing effects in Switzerland

Wenger, Ariane; Stauffacher, Michael; Dallo, Irina (2021): Public perception and acceptance of negative emission technologies – framing effects in Switzerland. In Climatic Change 167 (3-4), p. 533. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-021-03150-9.

"Limiting global warming to 1.5 °C requires negative emission technologies (NETs), which remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and permanently store it to offset unavoidable emissions. [...] In 2019, Switzerland adopted a net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 target, which will require the use of NETs. To examine the current Swiss public perception and acceptance of five different NETs, we conducted an online survey with Swiss citizens (N = 693). By using a between-subjects design, we investigated differences in public opinion, perception, and acceptance across three of the most used frames in the scientific literature — technological fix, moral hazard, and climate emergency."

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22.07.2021

# New Publications

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Carlisle, Daniel P.; et al. (2021): Public engagement with emerging technologies: Does reflective thinking affect survey responses?

Carlisle, Daniel P.; Feetham, Pamela M.; Wright, Malcolm J.; Teagle, Damon A. H. (2021): Public engagement with emerging technologies: Does reflective thinking affect survey responses? In Public understanding of science (Bristol, England), 9636625211029438. DOI: 10.1177/09636625211029438.

"We examine whether encouraging participants to engage in more reflective thinking affects their perceptions of emerging climate technologies."

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29.06.2021

# Media

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Environmental Health News: Reader response: Opponents of geoengineering misunderstand humanity’s choices

""Without some kind of prompt geoengineering action, climate change will accelerate the damage we are already seeing.""

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28.06.2021

# Media

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Bloomberg Green: Fear of Geoengineering Is Really Anxiety About Cutting Carbon

"Research into unproven technofixes isn’t a replacement for eliminating emissions, even if the debate over geoengineering is stuck on that concern."

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21.06.2021

# Media

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The Hill: A dangerous distraction: Increasing climate risk with solar geoengineering

"Such projects are controversial, in science and non-science circles, for three main reasons."

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10.06.2021

# New Publications

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Corbett, Charles (2020): Chemtrails and Solar Geoengineers: Governing Online Conspiracy Theory Misinformation

Corbett, Charles (2020): Chemtrails and Solar Geoengineers: Governing Online Conspiracy Theory Misinformation. In Missouri Law Review 85 (3). Available online at https://scholarship.law.missouri.edu/mlr/vol85/iss3/5.

"This Article assesses legal obstacles to regulating chemtrail misinformation and proposes responses that work within prevailing norms and laws governing online speech."

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12.04.2021

# Media

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The New Political: OPINION: Democrats Discuss — Geoengineering: Hail Mary or heresy?

"In the absence of action from governments, some scientists and leaders are researching and proposing the route of geoengineering. Geoengineering is not a new subject, but it has become increasingly present in climate and scientific circles."

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06.04.2021

# Media

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The Harvard Crimson: SEAS Researchers Postpone Test Flight for Controversial Geoengineering Project To Block Sun

"Harvard researchers announced Wednesday they will postpone a test flight for a controversial environmental engineering project — the Stratospheric Controlled Perturbation Experiment — after pushback from an Indigenous peoples’ group in Sweden."

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