14.06.2018

# Media

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C2G2: A living guide to geoengineering terms

"Geoengineering terminology can be a minefield. As discussed in an earlier post, choosing the right words for geoengineering, every term brings with it a host of values and assumptions, often political, some with significant ramifications for governance."

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09.06.2018

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C2G2: Preliminary public opinion on outdoor experiments

"As a student at Harvard College studying Environmental Science and Public Policy, I wrote my senior thesis about public opinion on SCoPEx. With funding from Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs,[2] I conducted deliberative workshops with Boston and Cambridge residents to explore public perception of SCoPEx and solar geoengineering more broadly. It is worth noting that the sample size for my study was quite small: the initial focus group involved four participants, and the subsequent deliberative workshops had five participants each for a total of twenty people. This was due to temporal and monetary constraints; participants were compensated at $15 per hour. Thus, the findings included here are tentative and meant to serve more as guidance for future research than definitive answers about public opinion on SCoPEx."

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19.05.2018

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C2G2: Using creativity to communicate about geoengineering

"I am at at the “Understanding Risk Forum” (UR2018) in Mexico, where I got a chance first hand to see how Pablo Suarez and his team from the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre are using the power of art to express some of the powerful emotions raised by the prospect of solar geoengineering. This is a conversation whose outcome may be driven as much by values and instinct as by science and deliberative debate. Animation, music, puzzles and poetry are powerful media which can help us better understand and navigate the dramatic challenges which solar geoengineering may bring."

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11.05.2018

# New Publications

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Ott, Konrad; Pohlers, Julia (2018): Citizen's jury „Climate Engineering – a oppurtunity against climate change?“

Ott, Konrad; Pohlers, Julia (2018): Bürgergutachten zum Bürgerforum „Climate Engineering – eine Möglichkeit gegen den Klimawandel?“. Schwerin.

"The DFG project TOMACE organized a citizen’s jury to discuss issues of climate engineering. From January until March 2018 a citizen’s jury took place in Schwerin. The organizers invited twenty-five citizens of Germany to discuss during the course of three weekends different issues concerning the climate engineering technologies Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI) and Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS). Within a citizen’s jury critical reflection and discussion as well as enabling people to argue for their own point of view is intended.

"

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11.05.2018

# Media

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Anthroposophere: Are Negative Emissions Positive?

"Geoengineering, climate change, and public perception."

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05.04.2018

# New Publications

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Fridahl, Mathias; Lehtveer, Mariliis (2018): Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Global potential, investment preferences, and deployment barriers

Fridahl, Mathias; Lehtveer, Mariliis (2018): Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Global potential, investment preferences, and deployment barriers. In Energy Research & Social Science 42, pp. 155–165. DOI: 10.1016/j.erss.2018.03.019.

"Using questionnaire data from UN climate change conferences, this paper explores the influence of expertise, actor type, and origin on respondents’ a) preferences for investing in BECCS, b) views of the role of BECCS as a mitigation technology, globally and domestically, and c) assessment of possible domestic barriers to BECCS deployment. Non-parametric statistical analysis reveals the low priority assigned to investments in BECCS, the anticipated high political and social constraints on deployment, and a gap between its low perceived domestic potential to contribute to mitigation and a slightly higher perceived global potential."

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27.01.2018

# New Publications

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Carr, Wylie A.; Yung, Laurie (2018): Perceptions of climate engineering in the South Pacific, Sub-Saharan Africa, and North American Arctic

Carr, Wylie A.; Yung, Laurie (2018): Perceptions of climate engineering in the South Pacific, Sub-Saharan Africa, and North American Arctic. In Climatic Change 17 (2), p. 145. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-018-2138-x.

"This study utilized in-depth interviews to explore the perspectives of vulnerable populations in the South Pacific, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the North American Arctic. Interviewees in this study were desperate for solutions to climate change and therefore willing to consider climate engineering. However, their willingness to consider climate engineering could be characterized as both deeply reluctant and highly conditional. "

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10.10.2017

# Media

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CIRES: Study Illuminates Public Perceptions of Climate Engineering

On Wibeck, et al. (2017). "New research provides insight into people’s perceptions of large-scale climate manipulation technology"

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17.07.2017

# New Publications

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Bellamy, Rob; et al. (2017): Public perceptions of geoengineering research governance. An experimental deliberative approach

"Public perceptions of geoengineering experiments were explored in three workshops. Majoritarian, consensual and individualistic deliberations were experimentally created. The perceived controllability of experiments is central to public acceptability. Legitimacy of experiments will depend on combinations of four controllability criteria. Technical determinations of scale or location will be poor predictors of public concerns."

 

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07.06.2017

# New Publications

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Sugiyama, Masahiro; et al. (2017): The Asia-Pacific’s role in the emerging solar geoengineering debate

Sugiyama, Masahiro; Asayama, Shinichiro; Ishii, Atsushi; Kosugi, Takanobu; Moore, John C.; Lin, Jolene et al. (2017): The Asia-Pacific’s role in the emerging solar geoengineering debate. In: Climatic Change 23, S. 189. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-017-1994-0 

"Here, we report the summary of a 2016 workshop on the significance and challenges of international collaboration on climate engineering research with a focus on the Asia-Pacific region. Because of the region’s interest in benefits and risks of climate engineering, there is a potential synergy between impact research on anthropogenic global warming and that on solar radiation management. Local researchers in the region can help make progress toward better understanding of impacts of solar radiation management."

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