05.07.2021

# Media

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dezeen: "One tonne of olivine sand can take in up to one tonne of CO2" says Teresa van Dongen

"Dutch designer Teresa van Dongen has launched Aireal, an online library showcasing materials that can capture atmospheric carbon."

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24.06.2021

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freethink: Green Sand Beaches Could Erase Carbon Emissions

"Once placed on the beach, the green sand sequesters carbon all on its own."

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24.06.2021

# Media

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The Guardian: Cloud spraying and hurricane slaying: how ocean geoengineering became the frontier of the climate crisis

"Around the world, dozens of ingenious projects are trying to ‘trick’ the ocean into absorbing more CO2. But critics warn of unforeseen consequences."

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14.12.2020

# New Publications

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Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A.E.; et al. (2021): The lithium and magnesium isotope signature of olivine dissolution in soil experiments

Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A.E.; Renforth, Phil; West, A. Joshua; Murphy, Melissa J.; Luu, Tu-Han; Henderson, Gideon M. (2021): The lithium and magnesium isotope signature of olivine dissolution in soil experiments. In Chemical Geology 560, p. 120008. DOI: 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2020.120008.

"This study presents lithium and magnesium isotope ratios of soils and their drainage waters from a well-characterised weathering experiment with two soil cores, one with olivine added to the surface layer, and the other a control core."

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14.12.2020

# New Publications

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Zinke, Laura (2020): Wearing down olivine

Zinke, Laura (2020): Wearing down olivine. In Nat Rev Earth Environ, Research Highlight. DOI: 10.1038/s43017-020-00132-w.

"Silicate minerals react with CO2 as they weather, converting CO2 to bicarbonate and effectively removing it from the atmosphere. Enhanced weathering of silicate minerals, such as olivine, is one proposed method to sequester atmospheric CO2 in efforts to mitigate climate change."

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10.12.2020

# New Publications

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Köhler, Peter (2020): Anthropogenic CO2 of High Emission Scenario Compensated After 3500 Years of Ocean Alkalinization With an Annually Constant Dissolution of 5 Pg of Olivine

Köhler, Peter (2020): Anthropogenic CO2 of High Emission Scenario Compensated After 3500 Years of Ocean Alkalinization With an Annually Constant Dissolution of 5 Pg of Olivine. In Front. Clim. 2. DOI: 10.3389/fclim.2020.575744.

"I here analyze ocean alkalinization in a high CO2 world (emission scenario SSP5-85-EXT++ and CDR-ocean-alk within CDRMIP) for the next millennia using a revised version of the carbon cycle model BICYCLE, whose long-term feedbacks are calculated for the next 1 million years."

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01.11.2020

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Podcast: Reviewer 2 does geoengineering: Kyle Manley discusses modelling Olivine weathering to sequester carbon in a volcanic coastal environment

"Kyle's brilliant paper is: Kyle Manley, T. Salles and R. D. Müller (2020) ‘Modeling the Dynamic Landscape Evolution of a Volcanic Coastal Environment Under Future Climate Trajectories’."

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15.10.2020

# New Publications

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Manley, Kyle; et al. (2020): Modeling the Dynamic Landscape Evolution of a Volcanic Coastal Environment Under Future Climate Trajectories

Manley, Kyle; Salles, T.; Müller, R. D. (2020): Modeling the Dynamic Landscape Evolution of a Volcanic Coastal Environment Under Future Climate Trajectories. In Front. Earth Sci. 8, p. 437. DOI: 10.3389/feart.2020.550312.

"Olivine weathering is a natural process that sequesters carbon out of the atmosphere, but is now being proposed as a strategy that can be artificially implemented to assist in the mitigation of anthropogenic carbon emissions. We use the landscape evolution model Badlands to identify a region (Tweed Caldera catchment in Eastern Australia) that has the potential for naturally enhanced supply of mafic sediments, known to be a carbon sink, into coastal environments."

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29.06.2020

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: How green sand could capture billions of tons of carbon dioxide

"Scientists are taking a harder look at using carbon-capturing rocks to counteract climate change, but lots of uncertainties remain."

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02.06.2020

# Media

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Fast Company: Ever been to a green sand beach? The newest geohack to fight climate change

"Project Vesta is conducting an experiment by spreading a green mineral on beaches, where its interaction with the waves will pull carbon from the air."

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