29.09.2021

# Media

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Spiegel: How cloud makers are trying to save corals (German)

German newpaper article on cloud seeding above the Great Barrier Reef.

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30.08.2021

# Political Papers

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Turley, C.; et al. (2021): Why the Ocean Matters in Climate Negotiations. COP26 Universities Network Briefing

Turley, C.; Racault, M.-F.; Roberts, J. M.; Scott, B. E.; Sharples, J.; Thiele, T. et al. (2021): Why the Ocean Matters in Climate Negotiations. COP26 Universities Network Briefing. COP26. UK. Available online at https://www.gla.ac.uk/media/Media_795093_smxx.pdf.

"Key messages:

  • The ocean has greatly slowed the rate of climate change. But at a cost: the ocean has also warmed, acidified and lost oxygen, whilst circulation patterns are changing, and sea levels are rising. The continuation of these changes not only threatens marine ecosystems, but also the future ability of the ocean to indirectly support all life on Earth. • A healthy and biodiverse ocean provides food, wellbeing, cultural heritage, and support for the sustainable livelihoods of billions of people – as well as mitigation and adaptation options for climate change.
  • Rapid reduction in greenhouse gas emissions to meet the Paris Agreement will decrease impacts on the ocean and benefit its ecosystems and all of society.
  • As part of the “climate system” the ocean needs to be better integrated in UNFCCC mitigation, adaptation and financial processes, including Nationally Determined Contributions, National Adaptation Plans and the Global Stocktake. • Improved ocean governance and management is needed to scale up marine protection and sustainable management of both the high seas and coastal waters.
  • Sustained, global ocean observations and projections of ocean physics, chemistry and biology are essential to inform better short and long-term policy-making for the benefit of people, nature and the economy.
  • Innovative ocean finance is required to achieve a sustainable ocean economy and protect the ocean’s natural capital."

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15.07.2019

# Media

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Phys.org: Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction

"Daniel Rothman, professor of geophysics and co-director of the Lorenz Center in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, has found that when the rate at which carbon enters the oceans pushes past a certain threshold—whether as the result of a sudden burst or a slow, steady influx—the Earth may respond with a runaway cascade of chemical feedbacks, leading to extreme ocean acidification that dramatically amplifies the effects of the original trigger."

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27.05.2019

# Media

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Helmholtz Blogs: Higlight Theme: How much CO2 does the ocean swallow? (German)

German article on CE

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Gattuso, J.; et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems

Gattuso, J.; Magnan, A.; Bopp, L.; Cheung, W.; Duarte, C.; Hinkel, J. et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 5, S. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00337.

"A comprehensive and systematic assessment of 13 global- and local-scale, ocean-based measures was performed to help steer the development and implementation of technologies and actions toward a sustainable outcome. We show that (1) all measures have tradeoffs and multiple criteria must be used for a comprehensive assessment of their potential, (2) greatest benefit is derived by combining global and local solutions, some of which could be implemented or scaled-up immediately, (3) some measures are too uncertain to be recommended yet, (4) political consistency must be achieved through effective cross-scale governance mechanisms, (5) scientific effort must focus on effectiveness, co-benefits, disbenefits, and costs of poorly tested as well as new and emerging measures."

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Rau, Greg H.; et al. (2018): Negative-CO 2 -emissions ocean thermal energy conversion

Rau, Greg H.; Baird, Jim R. (2018): Negative-CO 2 -emissions ocean thermal energy conversion. In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 95, S. 265–272. DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2018.07.027.

"Conversion of the ocean’s vertical thermal energy gradient to electricity via Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) has been demonstrated at small scales over the past century, and represents one of the largest (and growing) potential energy sources on the planet. Here we describe how OTEC could be modified to provide a large source of CO2-emissions-negative energy while also allowing heat removal from the surface ocean, helping to directly counter ocean/atmosphere warming."

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03.04.2018

# Media

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Wired: Ocean Acidification Could Be a Net Positive for Some Fish

"Some researchers are seriously considering geoengineering to reverse the slow acidification of the ocean. Dissolving minerals like olivine or limestone into seawater would increase its alkalinity. (Remember the pH strip in your 10 gallon fish tank? Blue=alkaline, red=acidic.) Not only would that make it easier on marine life, but it would also allow the ocean-sponge to soak up more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Two British scientists proposed this idea last year in a paper in the journal Reviews of Geophysics, predicting that with a bit more research (and money) it may be possible to capture hundreds of billions to trillions of tons of carbon without messing up the marine ecosystem."

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03.04.2018

# Media

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The Daily Catch: Environment The Geo-Engineering Idea That Could Theoretically Save The Ocean From Acidification

"To understand enhanced alkalinization, it helps to be reminded of some elementary school chemistry. On the pH scale, which measures acidity and alkalinity, lemon juice is acidic, plain water is neutral, and lime—not the citrus, but the mineral—is alkaline. When seawater absorbs carbon dioxide, chemical reactions reduce the ocean’s pH, making it more acidic."

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22.10.2017

# Media

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New Scientist: Dimming the sun could save corals from bleaching and hurricanes

"Time for artificial planet coolers? A cooling “sunshade” for the planet could reduce harmful coral bleaching and the number of hurricanes, which damage reefs. With the effects of climate change becoming increasingly apparent, the idea of squirting a cloud of sulphate aerosols into the upper atmosphere is being investigated by several groups of scientists. This would scatter some of the sun’s rays back into space, reducing the rate at which the Earth is warming."

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11.08.2017

# Media

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EOS: Preventing Climate Change by Increasing Ocean Alkalinity

"A recent paper in Reviews of Geophysics discussed increasing ocean alkalinity as an alternative method of carbon sequestration in response to climate change."

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