01.09.2020

# Media

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LegalPlanet: Time to Get Serious about Climate Change and Oceans

"Science can unlock powerful tools to fight climate change and ocean acidification, but only if we fund research and govern it well."

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09.02.2020

# New Publications

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Lovenduski, N. S.; et al. (2020): The Potential Impact of Nuclear Conflict on Ocean Acidification

Lovenduski, Nicole S., Cheryl S. Harrison, Holly Olivarez, Charles G. Bardeen, Owen B. Toon, Joshua Coupe, Alan Robock, Tyler Rohr, and Samantha Stevenson (2020): The Potential Impact of Nuclear Conflict on Ocean Acidification. Geophysical Research Letters 47 (3). https://doi.org/10.1029/2019gl086246.

"We demonstrate that the global cooling resulting from a range of nuclear conflict scenarios would temporarily increase the pH in the surface ocean by up to 0.06 units over a 5‐year period, briefly alleviating the decline in pH associated with ocean acidification."

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30.12.2019

# Media

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Eos: Dead Reefs Keep Calcifying but Only by Day

"While algae photosynthesize during the day, they take up carbon dioxide from the water and release oxygen. At night, however, algae respire like humans, taking up oxygen and exhaling carbon dioxide."

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11.12.2019

# New Publications

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Hofmann, M.; et al. (2019): Strong Time Dependence of Ocean Acidification Mitigation by Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Removal

Hofmann, M., S. Mathesius, E. Kriegler, D. P. van Vuuren, and H. J. Schellnhuber (2019): Strong Time Dependence of Ocean Acidification Mitigation by Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Removal. Nature Communications 10 (1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13586-4.

‌"Here, we show that stringent mitigation strategies consistent with the 1.5 C scenario could, indeed, provoke a critical difference for the ocean’s carbon cycle and calcium carbonate saturation states. Favorable conditions for calcifying organisms like tropical corals and polar pteropods, both of major importance for large ecosystems, can only be maintained if CO2 emissions fall rapidly between 2025 and 2050, potentially requiring an early deployment of CO2 removal techniques in addition to drastic emissions reduction."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Petrou, K.; et al. (2019): Acidification diminishes diatom silica production in the Southern Ocean

Petrou, Katherina; Baker, Kirralee G.; Nielsen, Daniel A.; Hancock, Alyce M.; Schulz, Kai G.; Davidson, Andrew T. (2019): Acidification diminishes diatom silica production in the Southern Ocean. In Nature Climate change 462, p. 346. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0557-y.

"Here we show that diatom silicification strongly diminishes with increased acidity in a natural Antarctic community. Analyses of single cells from within the community reveal that the effect of reduced pH on silicification differs among taxa, with several species having significantly reduced silica incorporation at CO2 levels equivalent to those projected for 2100."

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15.07.2019

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Phys.org: Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction

"Daniel Rothman, professor of geophysics and co-director of the Lorenz Center in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, has found that when the rate at which carbon enters the oceans pushes past a certain threshold—whether as the result of a sudden burst or a slow, steady influx—the Earth may respond with a runaway cascade of chemical feedbacks, leading to extreme ocean acidification that dramatically amplifies the effects of the original trigger."

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24.06.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: Marine-based management of atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification

Deadline: 31. July 2019

"Ocean biology, chemistry and physics play a central role in naturally controlling oceanic/atmospheric COlevels. To avoid major global climate impacts and ocean acidification, reducing COemissions is no longer sufficient; COremoval from the ocean/atmosphere system is now also required. This session will explore ways of restoring, enhancing, and augmenting naturally-occurring marine processes for regulating oceanic and atmospheric COand ocean acidity levels. Specific examples include, but are not limited to: Blue Carbon, macrophyte introduction, aquaculture, permaculture, nutrient enrichment, marine BECCS, enhanced weathering, alkalinity addition, enhanced upwelling/downwelling, and chemical or physical seawater COstripping, conducted at local to global scales. In addition to technical aspects, presentations on the economic, regulatory, policy, geopolitical, governance, legal and ethical implications of the preceding are also invited."

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27.05.2019

# Media

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Helmholtz Blogs: Higlight Theme: How much CO2 does the ocean swallow? (German)

German article on CE

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14.01.2019

# Media

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UMaine News: International research team to study effects of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in North Pacific

"The effect of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in the eastern North Pacific is the focus of a three-year, more than $954,000 National Science Foundation collaborative research grant to the University of Maine, University of Washington and University of South Florida."

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17.12.2018

# Media

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The National: Scientists aim to dim the sun to tackle climate change

"Scientists are preparing to test a radical new way of tackling climate change by deliberately dimming the sun. A team of researchers from Harvard University plans to release a balloon into the skies over the southwest United States in the new year. Once it reaches an altitude of 20km, the balloon will release a chalky material to bounce the sun’s heat back into space. Only a tiny amount of material will be released, and the effects will be limited to a few square kilometres. Even so, the experiment has reignited concern about such “geoengineering” solutions to tackling climate change."

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