15.07.2019

# Media

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Phys.org: Breaching a 'carbon threshold' could lead to mass extinction

"Daniel Rothman, professor of geophysics and co-director of the Lorenz Center in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, has found that when the rate at which carbon enters the oceans pushes past a certain threshold—whether as the result of a sudden burst or a slow, steady influx—the Earth may respond with a runaway cascade of chemical feedbacks, leading to extreme ocean acidification that dramatically amplifies the effects of the original trigger."

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24.06.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: Marine-based management of atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification

Deadline: 31. July 2019

"Ocean biology, chemistry and physics play a central role in naturally controlling oceanic/atmospheric COlevels. To avoid major global climate impacts and ocean acidification, reducing COemissions is no longer sufficient; COremoval from the ocean/atmosphere system is now also required. This session will explore ways of restoring, enhancing, and augmenting naturally-occurring marine processes for regulating oceanic and atmospheric COand ocean acidity levels. Specific examples include, but are not limited to: Blue Carbon, macrophyte introduction, aquaculture, permaculture, nutrient enrichment, marine BECCS, enhanced weathering, alkalinity addition, enhanced upwelling/downwelling, and chemical or physical seawater COstripping, conducted at local to global scales. In addition to technical aspects, presentations on the economic, regulatory, policy, geopolitical, governance, legal and ethical implications of the preceding are also invited."

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27.05.2019

# Media

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Helmholtz Blogs: Higlight Theme: How much CO2 does the ocean swallow? (German)

German article on CE

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14.01.2019

# Media

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UMaine News: International research team to study effects of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in North Pacific

"The effect of ocean acidification on iron availability to phytoplankton in the eastern North Pacific is the focus of a three-year, more than $954,000 National Science Foundation collaborative research grant to the University of Maine, University of Washington and University of South Florida."

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17.12.2018

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The National: Scientists aim to dim the sun to tackle climate change

"Scientists are preparing to test a radical new way of tackling climate change by deliberately dimming the sun. A team of researchers from Harvard University plans to release a balloon into the skies over the southwest United States in the new year. Once it reaches an altitude of 20km, the balloon will release a chalky material to bounce the sun’s heat back into space. Only a tiny amount of material will be released, and the effects will be limited to a few square kilometres. Even so, the experiment has reignited concern about such “geoengineering” solutions to tackling climate change."

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17.10.2018

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TechCrunch: At what point do we admit that geoengineering is an option?

"We already know how to cool the planet without reducing carbon. The solution is so simple it’s almost laughable: just make our clouds a little more reflective, so they reflect more of the sun’s light, and thus reduce our heat."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Gattuso, J.; et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems

Gattuso, J.; Magnan, A.; Bopp, L.; Cheung, W.; Duarte, C.; Hinkel, J. et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 5, S. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00337.

"A comprehensive and systematic assessment of 13 global- and local-scale, ocean-based measures was performed to help steer the development and implementation of technologies and actions toward a sustainable outcome. We show that (1) all measures have tradeoffs and multiple criteria must be used for a comprehensive assessment of their potential, (2) greatest benefit is derived by combining global and local solutions, some of which could be implemented or scaled-up immediately, (3) some measures are too uncertain to be recommended yet, (4) political consistency must be achieved through effective cross-scale governance mechanisms, (5) scientific effort must focus on effectiveness, co-benefits, disbenefits, and costs of poorly tested as well as new and emerging measures."

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03.09.2018

# Media

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NextBigFuture: Point of no return for climate action is point when Geoengineering will start

"So-called solar geoengineering aims to cool the planet by deflecting some of the Sun’s incoming rays. Ideas for accomplishing this include the dispersion of light-scattering particles in the upper atmosphere, which would mimic the cooling effect of major volcanic eruptions."

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01.08.2018

# Media

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The Conversation: Geoengineering the Great Barrier Reef needs strong rules

"A recent conference showcased new possibilities for enhancing Reef resilience, including boosting coral abundance and geoengineering techniques that would manipulate local conditions to reduce ocean temperatures."

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29.06.2018

# New Publications

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González, Miriam Ferrer; et al. (2018): Enhanced Rates of Regional Warming and Ocean Acidification after Termination of Large-scale Ocean Alkalinization

González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana; Sonntag, Sebastian; Schmidt, Hauke (2018): Enhanced Rates of Regional Warming and Ocean Acidification after Termination of Large-scale Ocean Alkalinization. In: Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI: 10.1029/2018GL077847.

"Termination effects of large‐scale Artificial Ocean Alkalinization (AOA) have received little attention because AOA was assumed to pose low environmental risk. With the Max‐Planck‐Institute Earth System Model, we use emission‐driven AOA simulations following the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). We find that after termination of AOA warming trends in regions of the Northern hemisphere become ∼50% higher than those in RCP8.5 with rates similar to those caused by termination of solar geoengineering over the following three decades after cessation (up to 0.15 K/year)."

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