20.07.2020

# Media

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Blog post: Hack the Planet: Pulling the climate switch (Anant Kapoor)

"Much like the trolley problem, geoengineering would have a massive accountability dilemma. Any positive action that still leads to calamities will come under heavy scrutiny, so each new disaster would easily be blamed on any prior meddling."

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09.07.2020

# New Publications

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Wagner, Gernot; and Daniel Zizzamia (2020): Green Moral Hazards

Wagner, Gernot; and Daniel Zizzamia (2020): Green Moral Hazards. NYU Wagner Research Paper (8 July 2020). Working draft.

"We here explore green moral hazards throughout American history. We argue that dismissing (solar) geoengineering on moral hazard grounds is often unproductive. Instead, especially those vehemently opposed to the technology should use it as an opportunity to expand the attention paid to the underlying environmental problem in the first place, actively invoking its opposite: ‘inverse moral hazards’."

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22.04.2020

# Media

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Phys.org: Why relying on new technology won't save the planet

"Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University."

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12.01.2020

# Political Papers

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C2G Guest Post by Gernot Wagner and Daniel Zizzamia: Green Moral Hazards

"For one, SRM is no “solution.” While CDR directly addresses the root cause of the problem – excess atmospheric carbon dioxide – SRM only does so indirectly. Meanwhile, either form of geoengineering conjures legitimate images of technofixes."

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11.12.2019

# Media

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Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist: Geoengineering is no climate fix. But calling it a moral hazard could be counterproductive

"Many experts are already worried that public discussion of geoengineering might dissuade policy makers from making harder but more substantial choices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This is commonly called the “moral hazard” problem, and it has become a major argument against even pursuing further research into geoengineering technologies."

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01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Raimi, K.; et al. (2019): Framing of Geoengineering Affects Support for Climate Change Mitigation

Raimi, K.; Maki, A.; Dana, D.; Vandenbergh, M. (2019): Framing of Geoengineering Affects Support for Climate Change Mitigation. In: Environmental Communication 13 (3), S. 300–319. DOI: 10.1080/17524032.2019.1575258.

"The growing recognition that climate change mitigation alone will be inadequate has led scientists and policymakers to discuss climate geoengineering. An experiment with a US sample found, contrary to previous research, that reading about geoengineering did not reduce conservatives’ skepticism about the existence of anthropogenic climate change. Moreover, depending on how it is framed, geoengineering can reduce support for mitigation among both conservatives and non-conservatives."

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18.02.2019

# Media

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Chatham House: Cool idea or hi-tech madness?

"As the threat from climate change looms ever larger, growing attention is being paid to proposals that sound as if they come straight from a sci-fi novel. One idea is to spray the stratosphere with particulates to reflect sunlight, thus reducing the temperature of planet Earth."

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17.12.2018

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Helmholtz Blogs: Got it? #59 Dr. Greenhouse (German)

German comic on CE.

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17.12.2018

# Media

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The Wire: Geoengineering: Should India Tread Carefully or Go Full Steam Ahead?

"Solar geoengineering doesn’t help reduce carbon emissions, and is founded on reckoning with the distressing possibility that reduction strategies won’t be enough."

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03.12.2018

# Media

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UrbDeZine: Climate Change Geoengineering: Moral Hazard of the Moral Hazard argument

"CBS News recently published an article about seeding the atmosphere with aerosols to reflect a portion of the sun’s rays away from earth as a viable method to cool the climate.  This method is sometimes referred to as the albedo method.  As noted in the article, it is controversial but has long been viewed as one of the most feasible and relatively inexpensive ways to turn down the Earth’s emissions-induced heat."

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