21.09.2016

# Media

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International Maritime Organization: More States urged to ratify the London Protocol

"Governments have been urged to ratify the London Protocol treaty which regulates the dumping of wastes at sea in order to ensure the universal application of its precautionary approach towards protection of the marine environment. [...] These include the issuing of permits for carbon dioxide sequestration in stable geological formations in the seabed to ensure permanent isolation of carbon dioxide and strong controls to regulate marine geoengineering activities - which can involve the introduction of substances or organisms into the sea in order to stimulate carbon dioxide uptake and reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere."

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01.09.2016

# New Publications

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Blaustein, Richard (2016): United Nations Seeks to Protect High-Seas Biodiversity

Blaustein, Richard (2016): United Nations Seeks to Protect High-Seas Biodiversity. In BioScience, biw097. DOI 10.1093/biosci/biw097

Science writer's article on biodiversity and also CE. "Beyond the life it supports, the global ocean system plays a key role in mitigating climate change. The seas have an immense natural capacity to absorb heat and carbon. Some researchers also look to the oceans for potential geoengineering schemes, such as adding iron as a way to sequester carbon."

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24.08.2016

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ABC News: Plan B for climate change: Tassie scientists looking at what to do if the worst happens

"Fertilising the oceans, painting the deserts white or sending umbrellas into orbit are some of the real things being explored by scientists as a "plan B" for dealing with climate change."

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11.08.2016

# Projects

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Project: Geoengineering the Southern Ocean? A transdisciplinary assessment

"This project will therefore involve a multi-faceted study of geoengineering and geoengineering governance, involving several phases of data collection, collation, analysis and dissemination. [...] The project will adopt a mixed-methods approach to data collection, involving such techniques as desktop studies, interviews with scientists, scientific translation and communication, public data-gathering through such activities as surveys (eg. SurveyMonkey), and standard legal and policy textual analysis."

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19.07.2016

# New Publications

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Feng, Ellias Y.; et al. (2016): Could artificial ocean alkalinization protect tropical coral ecosystems from ocean acidification?

Feng, Ellias Y.; Keller, David P.; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas (2016): Could artificial ocean alkalinization protect tropical coral ecosystems from ocean acidification? In Environ. Res. Lett. 11 (7), p. 74008–74008. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/11/7/074008.

"Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) is investigated as a method to mitigate local ocean acidification and protect tropical coral ecosystems during a 21st century high CO2 emission scenario. Employing an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, our implementation of AOA in the Great Barrier Reef, Caribbean Sea and South China Sea regions, shows that alkalinization has the potential to counteract expected 21st century local acidification in regard to both oceanic surface aragonite saturation Ω and surface pCO2."

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18.07.2016

# Media

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Yale environment 360: How Growing Sea Plants Can Help Slow Ocean Acidification

"Researchers are finding that kelp, eelgrass, and other vegetation can effectively absorb CO2 and reduce acidity in the ocean. Growing these plants in local waters, scientists say, could help mitigate the damaging impacts of acidification on marine life."

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07.07.2016

# Media

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Think Progress: Can Kelp Save The Pacific Ocean?

On artificial upwelling and other maritime sequestration. "When it comes to ocean acidification, the Pacific Northwest is set to be ground zero for some of the most dire impacts — so it makes sense that scientists in Washington state would be on the forefront of research aimed at finding solutions."

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06.07.2016

# Media

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Energy Collective: The Carbonate Solution, Part 2: Other Approaches

"I want to cover three other ways to exploit the chemistries of common carbonate minerals for large scale carbon capture and storage. They are less direct, and each has its own issues, but all three are much more energy-efficient than brute force calcination of limestone."

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27.06.2016

# Media

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Maritime Global News: UK First to Accept Marine Geoengineering Amendments

"The United Kingdom has become the first state to formally accept the 2013 marine geoengineering amendments to the 1996 "London Protocol", the treaty covering dumping of wastes at sea."

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30.05.2016

# New Publications

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González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations. In Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI 10.1002/2016GL068576.

"Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max-Planck-Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions."

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