10.10.2021

# New Publications

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Kieft, Brandon; et al. (2021): Phytoplankton exudates and lysates support distinct microbial consortia with specialized metabolic and ecophysiological traits

Kieft, Brandon; Li, Zhou; Bryson, Samuel; Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Mayali, Xavier; Mueller, Ryan S. (2021): Phytoplankton exudates and lysates support distinct microbial consortia with specialized metabolic and ecophysiological traits. In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 118 (41). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2101178118.

"Blooms of marine phytoplankton fix complex pools of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that are thought to be partitioned among hundreds of heterotrophic microbes at the base of the food web. While the relationship between microbial consumers and phytoplankton DOM is a key component of marine carbon cycling, microbial loop metabolism is largely understood from model organisms and substrates. Here, we took an untargeted approach to measure and analyze partitioning of four distinct phytoplankton-derived DOM pools among heterotrophic populations in a natural microbial community using a combination of ecogenomics, stable isotope probing (SIP), and proteomics. Each 13C-labeled exudate or lysate from a diatom or a picocyanobacterium was preferentially assimilated by different heterotrophic taxa with specialized metabolic and physiological adaptations."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Fast Company: These carbon-capturing robotic seaweed farms are like planting forests in the ocean

"Phykos is trying to pioneer a new form of carbon sequestration: using automated boats to grow seaweed in the middle of the ocean, then sinking it to the ocean floor."

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06.10.2021

# New Publications

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Marieni, Chiara; et al. (2021): Mineralization potential of water-dissolved CO2 and H2S injected into basalts as function of temperature: Freshwater versus Seawater

Marieni, Chiara; Voigt, Martin; Clark, Deirdre E.; Gíslason, Sigurður R.; Oelkers, Eric H. (2021): Mineralization potential of water-dissolved CO2 and H2S injected into basalts as function of temperature: Freshwater versus Seawater. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 109, p. 103357. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2021.103357.

"Mineralization of freshwater-dissolved gases, such as CO2 and H2S, in subsurface mafic rocks is a successful permanent gas storage strategy. To apply this approach globally, the composition of locally available water must be considered. In this study, reaction path models were run to estimate the rate and extent of gas mineralization reactions during gas-charged freshwater and seawater injection into basalts at temperatures of 260, 170, 100, and 25°C."

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06.10.2021

# New Publications

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Voigt, Martin; et al. (2021): An experimental study of basalt–seawater–CO2 interaction at 130 °C

Voigt, Martin; Marieni, Chiara; Baldermann, Andre; Galeczka, Iwona M.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R. (2021): An experimental study of basalt–seawater–CO2 interaction at 130 °C. In Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 308, pp. 21–41. DOI: 10.1016/j.gca.2021.05.056.

"Over millions of years, the interaction of marine basalt with percolating seawater in low-temperature ocean floor hydrothermal systems leads to the formation of calcite and aragonite. The presence of these minerals in marine basalts provides evidence for substantial CO2 fixation in these rocks. Here, we report on laboratory experiments to study this process under enhanced CO2 partial pressures (pCO2) at 130 °C. Mid-ocean-ridge-basalt (MORB) glass was reacted with North Atlantic Seawater charged with CO2 in batch experiments lasting up to 7 months."

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04.10.2021

# Media

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The Hill: Can we harness the natural power of the ocean to fight climate change?

"While work has started on the development of approaches, most potential pathways are in their infancy, meanwhile we are just beginning to develop and test different approaches and measure their range of potential consequences. And to date, most of this CDR focus has been on land-based approaches. It’s time to turn our attention to the other 70 percent of our planet’s surface — the ocean."

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04.10.2021

# Media

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Ends Report: BECCS, DACCS and blue carbon: Everything you need to know about negative emissions technologies

"MPs have announced an inquiry into how greenhouse gases can be absorbed and stored. Here’s what you need to know about capturing emissions from biomass combustion, filtering CO2 from the air and other rival ideas."

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04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Wood, Robert (2021): Assessing the potential efficacy of marine cloud brightening for cooling Earth using a simple heuristic model

Wood, Robert (2021): Assessing the potential efficacy of marine cloud brightening for cooling Earth using a simple heuristic model. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 21 (19), pp. 14507–14533. DOI: 10.5194/acp-21-14507-2021.

"A simple heuristic model is described to assess the potential for increasing solar reflection by augmenting the aerosol population below marine low clouds, which nominally leads to increased cloud droplet concentration and albedo. The model estimates the collective impact of many point source particle sprayers, each of which generates a plume of injected particles that affects clouds over a limited area."

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01.10.2021

# Media

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The Economist: Floating offshore farms should increase production of seaweed

"In many places where seaweed used to thrive, often growing in vast “forests”, it is disappearing. The cause is global warming, which, by heating the ocean’s upper layer, reduces its density through thermal expansion—thus making it more buoyant. That extra buoyancy means it is less likely to mix with cooler, denser and more nutrient-rich waters below. This is bad for the marine environment in general. More specifically, it is bad for commercial seaweed farming, a business with revenues of (depending on whom you ask) between $6bn and $40bn a year."

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30.09.2021

# New Publications

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Alcalde, Juan; et al. (2021): A criteria-driven approach to the CO2 storage site selection of East Mey for the acorn project in the North Sea

Alcalde, Juan; Heinemann, Niklas; James, Alan; Bond, Clare E.; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mackay, Eric J. et al. (2021): A criteria-driven approach to the CO2 storage site selection of East Mey for the acorn project in the North Sea. In Marine and Petroleum Geology 133, p. 105309. DOI: 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2021.105309.

"Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an essential tool in the fight against climate change. Any prospective storage site must meet various criteria that ensure the effectiveness, safety and economic viability of the storage operations. Finding the most suitable site for the storage of the captured CO2 is an essential part of the CCS chain of activity. This work addresses the site selection of a second site for the Acorn CCS project, a project designed to develop a scalable, full-chain CCS project in the North Sea (offshore northeast Scotland). This secondary site has been designed to serve as a backup and upscaling option for the Acorn Site, and has to satisfy pivotal project requirements such as low cost and high storage potential."

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27.09.2021

# Media

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PhysOrg: Metals supercharge a promising method to bury harmful carbon dioxide under the sea

"There's a global race to reduce the amount of harmful gases in our atmosphere to slow down the pace of climate change, and one way to do that is through carbon capture and sequestration—sucking carbon out of the air and burying it. At this point, however, we're capturing only a fraction of the carbon needed to make any kind of dent in climate change.Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin, in partnership with ExxonMobil, have made a new discovery that may go a long way in changing that. They have found a way to supercharge the formation of carbon dioxide-based crystal structures that could someday store billions of tons of carbon under the ocean floor for centuries, if not forever."

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