20.01.2020

# Media

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Mirage News: Reflecting sunlight away from earth could fight climate change and poverty

“We find hotter countries respond more to small changes in temperature,” said Moreno-Cruz, who is also Canada Research Chair in energy transitions. “Because poorer countries tend to be hotter, there is a disproportional impact of climate on those countries.

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14.01.2020

# New Publications

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Stephens, Jennie C.; Surprise, Kevin (2020): The hidden injustices of advancing solar geoengineering research

Stephens, Jennie C.; Surprise, Kevin (2020): The hidden injustices of advancing solar geoengineering research. In Global Sustainability 3. DOI: 10.1017/sus.2019.28.

"Solar geoengineering research advances an extreme, expert–elite technocratic intervention into the global climate system that would serve to further concentrate contemporary forms of political and economic power. For these reasons, we argue that it is unethical and unjust to advance solar geoengineering research."

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14.01.2020

# New Publications

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Stephens, Jennie C.; Surprise, Kevin (2020): The hidden injustices of advancing solar geoengineering research

Stephens, Jennie C.; Surprise, Kevin (2020): The hidden injustices of advancing solar geoengineering research. In Glob. Sustain. 3, p. 102. DOI: 10.1017/sus.2019.28.

"We find impacts of climate changes on global GDP-per-capita by the end of the century are temperature-driven, highly dispersed, and model dependent. Across all model specifications, however, income inequality between countries is lower with solar geoengineering. "

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Gardiner, Stephen M.; Fragnière, Augustin (2019): Geoengineering, Political Legitimacy and Justice

Gardiner, Stephen M.; Fragnière, Augustin (2019): Geoengineering, Political Legitimacy and Justice. In Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (3), pp. 265–269. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562524.

"The aim of this special issue is to move forward the normative discussion of political legitimacy and justice specifically. Our starting assumption is that it would be unwise to proceed with particular technologies and develop governance systems without at the same time addressing hard questions about justice and legitimacy. One reason for this is that clarifying the central normative questions is key to understanding obstacles to, parameters for, and constraints on research, policy and governance. In particular, it matters for policy if some kinds of geoengineering turn out to be easier from the point of view of justice and legitimacy than others."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies

Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies. In: TREVOR M. LETCHER (Hg.): MANAGING GLOBAL WARMING. An interface of technology and human issues. [S.l.]: ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS, S. 639–657.

"This chapter gives a brief overview of the emergence of the idea of negative emissions technologies and solar radiation management technologies in climate change policy and the normative issues—questions of values—that they might raise. Normative issues fall into four broad categories: (1) distributive justice, (2) procedural justice, (3) ethical issues, and (4) rectificatory justice."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Hourdequin, M. (2019): Climate Change, Climate Engineering, and the ‘Global Poor’

Hourdequin, M. (2019): Climate Change, Climate Engineering, and the ‘Global Poor’. What Does Justice Require? In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 19 (6), S. 1–19. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562525.

"In recent work, Joshua Horton and David Keith argue on distributive and consequentialist grounds that research into solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering is justified because the resulting knowledge has the potential to benefit everyone, particularly the ‘global poor.’ I argue that this view overlooks procedural and recognitional justice, and thus relegates to the background questions of how SRM research should be governed."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Sikka, T. (2019): Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice. The Standpoint of the Vulnerable

Sikka, T. (2019): Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice. The Standpoint of the Vulnerable. Cham, Cham: Springer International Publishing; Springer (SpringerBriefs in Sociology). pp. 15-44.

"This Chapter provides an overview of geoengineering research, including the status of current research and testing, the significance of modeling and simulation, the role of public participation, and the subject of governance. A discussion of geoengineering’s basic epistemology, values and background assumptions is also included with specific attention paid to the solar radiation management technique of atmospheric sulfate geoengineering."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Preston, C.; et al. (2019): Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach

Preston, C.; Carr, W. (2019): Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 4 (7), S. 1–16. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562527.

"Given the existing inequities in climate change, any proposed climate engineering strategy to solve the climate problem must meet a high threshold for justice. In contrast to an overly thin paradigm for justice that demands only a science-based assessment of potential temperature-related benefits and harms, we argue for the importance of attention to recognitional justice."

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20.09.2018

# New Publications

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Gardiner, S.; et al. (2018): The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach

Gardiner, S.; Fragnière, A. (2018): The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (2), S. 143–174. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1509472.

"This article offers a constructive critique of the Oxford Principles for the governance of geoengineering and proposes an alternative set of principles, the Tollgate Principles, based on that critique. Our main concern is that, despite their many merits, the Oxford Principles remain largely instrumental and dominated by procedural considerations; therefore, they fail to lay the groundwork sufficiently for the more substantive ethical debate that is needed. The article aims to address this gap by making explicit many of the important ethical questions lurking in the background, especially around values such as justice, respect and legitimacy."

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23.12.2017

# Media

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IIED: Geoengineering and development – what price on equity and justice in the coming climate culture wars?

"Climate geoengineering is a divisive topic. What could be good – the promise of ways to either cool the planet through enhancing the reflection of sunlight, or to remove CO2 from the atmosphere thereby reducing global warming – could also be terrible. Particularly if banking on hypothetical solutions from unproven technology reduces the urgency of efforts to stop putting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere."

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