25.02.2020

# New Publications

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Yamamoto, Akitomo; et al. (2019): Glacial CO2 decrease and deep-water deoxygenation by iron fertilization from glaciogenic dust

Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Ito, Akinori; Oka, Akira (2019): Glacial CO2 decrease and deep-water deoxygenation by iron fertilization from glaciogenic dust. In Clim. Past Discuss. (under review). DOI: 10.5194/cp-2019-31.

"In this study, we report the significance of iron fertilization from glaciogenic dust for glacial CO2 decrease and deep-water deoxygenation using our numerical simulation, which successfully reproduces the magnitude and large-scale pattern of the observed oxygen changes from the present to Last Glacial Maximum."

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21.02.2020

# New Publications

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Lauderdale, Jonathan Maitland; et al. (2020): Microbial feedbacks optimize ocean iron availability

Lauderdale, Jonathan Maitland; Braakman, Rogier; Forget, Gaël; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Follows, Michael J. (2020): Microbial feedbacks optimize ocean iron availability. In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1917277117.

"Dissolved iron is quickly lost from the ocean, but its availability to marine microbes may be enhanced by binding with organic molecules which, in turn, are produced by microbes. We hypothesize this forms a reinforcing cycle between biological activity and iron cycling that locally matches the availability of iron and other nutrients, leading to global-scale resource colimitation between macronutrients and micronutrients, and maximizing biological productivity."

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21.02.2020

# Media

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European Scientist: Fertilising the ocean with iron might not work, a new study suggests

"The benefits of adding more iron to the oceans — known as iron fertilisation — would be limited, at least on a global scale, according to a new study published in the 18 February 2020 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1). In other words, there is ‘just enough’ iron in the ocean."

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20.02.2020

# Media

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MIT News: Seeding oceans with iron may not impact climate change

"Study finds Earth’s oceans contain just the right amount of iron; adding more may not improve their ability to absorb carbon dioxide."

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18.02.2019

# New Publications

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Emerson, D. (2019): Biogenic Iron Dust: A Novel Approach to Ocean Iron Fertilization as a Means of Large Scale Removal of Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere

Emerson, D. (2019): Biogenic Iron Dust: A Novel Approach to Ocean Iron Fertilization as a Means of Large Scale Removal of Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 6, S. 3944. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00022.

"This is a proposal for ocean iron fertilization as a means to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The idea is to take advantage of nanoparticulate, poorly crystalline Fe-oxides produced by chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing bacteria as an iron source to the ocean. Upon drying these oxides produce a fine powder that could be dispersed at altitude by aircraft to augment wind-driven Aeolian dust that is a primary iron source to the open ocean."

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13.10.2018

# Media

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Stern: Climate-Alarm. Redirection of sunlight, iron fertilization of the oceans: This is what plan B looks like for climate rescue (German)

German article on CE.

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13.10.2018

# Media

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Berliner Zeitung: Plan-B against climate change (German)

German article on CE.

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16.08.2018

# New Publications

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Schulz, I.; et al. (2018): Remarkable structural resistance of a nanoflagellate-dominated plankton community to iron fertilization during the Southern Ocean experiment LOHAFEX

Schulz, I.; Montresor, M.; Klaas, C.; Assmy, P.; Wolzenburg, S.; Gauns, M. et al. (2018): Remarkable structural resistance of a nanoflagellate-dominated plankton community to iron fertilization during the Southern Ocean experiment LOHAFEX. In: Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 601, S. 77–95. DOI: 10.3354/meps12685.

"We attribute the unusually high biomass attained and maintained by ANF to the absence of their grazers, the salps, and to constraints on protozooplankton grazers by heavy predation exerted by the large copepod stock. The resistance to change of the ecosystem structure over 38 d after fertilization, indicated by homogeneity at regional and temporal scales, suggests that it was locked into a stable, mature state that had evolved in the course of the seasonal cycle. The LOHAFEX bloom provides a case study of a resistant/robust dynamic equilibrium between auto- and heterotrophic ecosystem components resulting in low vertical flux both inside and outside the patch despite high biomass levels."

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06.08.2018

# Media

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Das Parlament: Climate killer into the sea? (German)

German article on CE.

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30.07.2018

# Media

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Cosmos: 6 ways geoengineering could fight climate change

"Some researchers think massive engineering projects might help slow global warming. Other scientists aren’t so sure. Stephen Fleischfresser surveys the top six proposals."

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