03.08.2020

# New Publications

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Bas, Muhammet A.; Mahajan, Aseem (2020): Contesting the climate

Bas, Muhammet A.; Mahajan, Aseem (2020): Contesting the climate. In Climatic Change. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-020-02758-7.

"We find that when countries’ temperature preferences diverge, applications of geoengineering and countergeoengineering can be highly wasteful due to deployment in opposite directions."

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30.04.2020

# Media

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Video: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs: Prospects for Global Coordination in an Age of Pandemics and Emerging Climate Technologies

"At the same time, new technologies to alter the climate are emerging, posing their own challenges to multilateralism. What, if anything, can we learn from the global response to the pandemic that might aid us in governing new, climate-altering technologies?"

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07.12.2017

# New Publications

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Nicholson, Simon; et al. (2017): Solar radiation management. A proposal for immediate polycentric governance

Nicholson, Simon; Jinnah, Sikina; Gillespie, Alexander (2017): Solar radiation management. A proposal for immediate polycentric governance. In Climate Policy 21 (1), pp. 1–13. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2017.1400944.

"Specifically, we build from existing literature to argue that SRM governance must simultaneously: guard against the risks of uncontrolled SRM development; enable potentially valuable research; build legitimacy for research and any future policy through broad public engagement and ensure that SRM is only considered as one part of a broader mitigation agenda. We propose three interventions to work towards those objectives in the near term by: developing a transparency mechanism for research; creating a global forum for public engagement and including consideration of SRM in the global stocktake under the Paris Agreement."

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01.08.2017

# New Publications

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Corry, Olaf (2017): The international politics of geoengineering. The feasibility of Plan B for tackling climate change

Corry, Olaf (2017): The international politics of geoengineering. The feasibility of Plan B for tackling climate change. In Security Dialogue 48 (4), pp. 297–315. DOI: 10.1177/0967010617704142.

"This article puts forward what it calls the ‘security hazard’ and argues that this could be a crucial factor in determining whether a technology is able, ultimately, to reduce climate risks. Ideas about global governance of geoengineering rely on heroic assumptions about state rationality and a generally pacific international system. Moreover, if in a climate engineered world weather events become something certain states can be made directly responsible for, this may also negatively affect prospects for ‘Plan A’, i.e. an effective global agreement on mitigation."

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05.12.2016

# New Publications

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Heyen, Daniel (2016): Strategic Conflicts on the Horizon. R&D Incentives for Environmental Technologies

Heyen, Daniel (2016): Strategic Conflicts on the Horizon. R&D Incentives for Environmental Technologies. In Clim. Change Econ. 07 (04), p. 1650013–1650013. DOI 10.1142/S2010007816500135.

"This paper focuses on a specific mechanism for strategic distortions in this R&D game. In this mechanism, the outlook of future conflicts surrounding technology deployment directly impacts on the willingness to undertake R&D. Apart from free-riding, a different deployment conflict with distortive effects on innovation can occur. Low deployment costs and heterogeneous preferences might give rise to ‘free-driving’ (Weitzman, ML (2015). A voting architecture for the governance of free-driver externalities, with application to geoengineering. The Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 117(4), 1049–1068): The country with the highest preference for technology deployment, the free driver, may dominate the deployment outcome to the detriment of others."

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17.11.2016

# New Publications

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Rabitz, Florian (2016): Going rogue? Scenarios for unilateral geoengineering

Rabitz, Florian (2016): Going rogue? Scenarios for unilateral geoengineering. In Futures 84, pp. 98–107. DOI 10.1016/j.futures.2016.11.001.

"I develop a conceptual framework for the study of unilateral geoengineering which distinguishes different types of actors, their capacities and decision-making contexts. Focusing on Ocean Iron Fertilization and Stratospheric Aerosol Injections, I develop several short- and long-term scenarios in which actors are conceivably both willing and able to deploy those technologies on a scale sufficient for impacting the climate system. Beyond being the first paper to develop a systematic approach to unilateral geoengineering, I show that some scenarios which stir public concern are implausible."

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01.09.2015

# New Publications

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Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric

Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric. In Environ Resource Econ. DOI: 10.1007/s10640-015-9956-3

"We study a dynamic game of climate policy design in terms of emissions and solar radiation management (SRM) involving two heterogeneous countries or group of countries. Countries emit greenhouse gasses (GHGs), and can block incoming radiation by unilateral SRM activities, thus reducing global temperature. Heterogeneity is modelled in terms of the social cost of SRM, the environmental damages due to global warming, the productivity of emissions in terms of generating private benefits, the rate of impatience, and the private cost of geoengineering."

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16.07.2015

# New Publications

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Horton, Joshua B.; Reynolds, Jesse (2015): The International Politics of Climate Engineering: A Review and Prospectus for International. (forthcoming)

Horton, Joshua B.; Reynolds, Jesse (2015): The International Politics of Climate Engineering: A Review and Prospectus for International. (forthcoming). In International Studies Review.

"Thus we offer here an overview of the existing academic literature on the international politics of climate engineering, and a preliminary assessment of its strengths and lacunae. We trace several key themes in this corpus, including problem structure; the concern that climate engineering could undermine emissions cuts; the potentially ‘slippery slope’ of research and development; unilateral implementation; interstate conflict; militarization; rising tensions between industrialized and developing countries; and governance challenges and opportunities."

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26.08.2014

# Media

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The Mad Spaceball Blog: Rain from SpaceLight

"Lasers from space to make rain and take apart greenhouse gasses.  They’re definitely good examples of why space matters, if they work."

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26.08.2014

# Media

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Süddeutsche Zeitung: Climate Engineering, tinkering the climate

German newspaper on Berlin CEC14 conference.

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