06.05.2020

# New Publications

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Workman, Mark; et al. 2020: “Decision Making in Contexts of Deep Uncertainty - An Alternative Approach for Long-Term Climate Policy.”

Workman, Mark, Kate Dooley, Guy Lomax, James Maltby, and Geoff Darch. 2020: “Decision Making in Contexts of Deep Uncertainty - An Alternative Approach for Long-Term Climate Policy.” Environmental Science & Policy 103 (January 2020): 77–84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2019.10.002.

‌"Here, we critically examine both the use of BECCS in mitigation scenarios and the decision making philosophy underlying the use of integrated assessment modelling to inform climate policy."

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02.04.2020

# New Publications

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Fuhrman, Jay; et al. 2019: “From Zero to Hero?: Why Integrated Assessment Modeling of Negative Emissions Technologies Is Hard and How We Can Do Better.”

Fuhrman, Jay, Haewon McJeon, Scott C. Doney, William Shobe, and Andres F. Clarens. 2019: “From Zero to Hero?: Why Integrated Assessment Modeling of Negative Emissions Technologies Is Hard and How We Can Do Better.” Frontiers in Climate 1 (December). https://doi.org/10.3389/fclim.2019.00011.

"Climate change mitigation strategies informed by Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) increasingly rely on major deployments of negative emissions technologies (NETs) to achieve global climate targets. Although NETs can strongly complement emissions mitigation efforts, this dependence on the presumed future ability to deploy NETs at scale raises questions about the structural elements of IAMs that are influencing our understanding of mitigation efforts."

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05.12.2019

# New Publications

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Butnar, I., et al. (2019): A Deep Dive into the Modelling Assumptions for Biomass with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS): A Transparency Exercise

Butnar, Isabela, Pei-Hao Li, Neil Strachan, Joana Portugal Pereira, Ajay Gambhir, and Peter Smith (2019): A Deep Dive into the Modelling Assumptions for Biomass with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS): A Transparency Exercise. Environmental Research Letters, November. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab5c3e.

‌"Through a structured review, we find that all IAMs communicate wider system assumptions and major cost assumptions transparently. This quality however fades as we dig deeper into modelling details."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Baird, J. (2019): The integrated thermodynamic geoengineering/negative emissions OTEC model

Baird, Jim (2019): The integrated thermodynamic geoengineering/negative emissions OTEC model. Energy Central. Available online at https://www.energycentral.com/c/ec/integrated-thermodynamic-geoengineeringnegative-emissions-otec-model.

"The solution advanced in this paper is an amalgam of energy production through the conversion of the heat of global warming to productive energy, (thermodynamic geoengineering (TG)), solar radiation management (SRM) through load balancing trapped solar energy and carbon-dioxide removal (CDR) thru negative-CO2-emissions ocean thermal energy conversion (NEOTEC)."

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09.02.2017

# New Publications

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Mathias, Jean-Denis; et al. (2017): On our rapidly shrinking capacity to comply with the planetary boundaries on climate change

Mathias, Jean-Denis; Anderies, John M.; Janssen, Marco A. (2017): On our rapidly shrinking capacity to comply with the planetary boundaries on climate change. In Scientific reports 7, p. 42061. DOI: 10.1038/srep42061.

"Here, we use the DICE model to analyze the set of adaptive climate policies that comply with the two planetary boundaries related to climate change: (1) staying below a CO2 concentration of 550 ppm until 2100 and (2) returning to 350 ppm in 2100. Our results enable decision makers to assess the following milestones: (1) a minimum of 33% reduction of CO2 emissions by 2055 in order to stay below 550 ppm by 2100 (this milestone goes up to 46% in the case of delayed policies); and (2) carbon neutrality and the effective implementation of innovative geoengineering technologies (10% negative emissions) before 2060 in order to return to 350 ppm in 2100, under the assumption of getting out of the baseline scenario without delay."

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