23.11.2020

# Media

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Medium: Carbon dioxide cleanup: What’s the role of government?

"Given the growing drumbeat for government action, what is government’s role and how can public decision-makers know which methods work and which don’t?"

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23.11.2020

# New Publications

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Lockley, Andrew (2020): State commissioning of Solar Radiation Management geoengineering

Lockley, Andrew (2020): State commissioning of Solar Radiation Management geoengineering. In Ethics, Policy & Environment. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2020.1848176.

"Notwithstanding concerns about privatisation, we assume state commissioning of SRM - proposing and analysing plausible governance, by adapting extant proposals. We consider two regulatory functions: legal/corporate; and scientific/technical. We briefly discuss mandatory, emissions-linked SRM funding."

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23.11.2020

# Media

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Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment: A New Horizon for Governance?

"But in the excitement of finally having the most progressive presidential platform yet seen for climate change in hopes of limiting temperature rise and achieving net-zero emissions, there remains an important question in this arena: will this administration grapple with solar geoengineering?"

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13.11.2020

# New Publications

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Reynolds, Jesse L. (2020): Is solar geoengineering ungovernable? A critical assessment of governance challenges identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Reynolds, Jesse L. (2020): Is solar geoengineering ungovernable? A critical assessment of governance challenges identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. DOI: 10.1002/wcc.690.

"I find seven such challenges identified in the IPCC reports: that SRM could lessen mitigation; that its termination would cause severe climatic impacts; that researching SRM would create a “slippery slope” to its inevitable and unwanted use; that decisions to use it could be contrary to democratic norms; that the public may not accept SRM; that it could be unethical; and that decisions to use SRM could be unilateral. After assessing the extent to which these challenges are supported by existing evidence, scholarly literature, and robust logic, I conclude that, for six of the seven, the IPCC's claims variously are speculative, fail to consider both advantages and disadvantages, implicitly make unreasonable negative assumptions, are contrary to existing evidence, and/or are meaninglessly vague."

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13.11.2020

# Media

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LegalPlanet: The IPCC Misses the Mark on Solar Geoengineering

"The Intergovernmental Panel Climate Change poorly portrays the “institutional and social constraints to deployment related to governance”."

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11.11.2020

# Media

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China Dialogue: Has ‘geoengineering’ arrived in China?

"With the climate crisis becoming ever more urgent, Chinese and international experts are looking at the governance of geoengineering research and deployment."

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10.11.2020

# New Publications

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Kessler, Juliana (2019): Novel non-state sources of de facto governance in the solar geoengineering governance landscape: The case of SRMGI and C2G

Kessler, Juliana (2019): Novel non-state sources of de facto governance in the solar geoengineering governance landscape: The case of SRMGI and C2G. MSc Thesis Environmental Policy Group. Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen.

"Calls for anticipatory governance have been on the rise in discussions on solar geoengineering. Two influential governance initiatives, the Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative (SRMGI) and the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative (C2G), intervene in and steer the solar geoengineering governance landscape, thus de facto governing it. This research analyses the governance initiatives’ interventions and governance effects as it is argued that their steering has major implications, also for how (future) governance options are envisioned and constructed."

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29.10.2020

# New Publications

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Low, Sean; Boettcher, Miranda (2020): Delaying decarbonization: Climate governmentalities and sociotechnical strategies from Copenhagen to Paris

Low, Sean; Boettcher, Miranda (2020): Delaying decarbonization: Climate governmentalities and sociotechnical strategies from Copenhagen to Paris. In Earth System Governance 5, p. 100073. DOI: 10.1016/j.esg.2020.100073.

"An era (2005–2015) centered around the Copenhagen Accord saw the rise of several immature sociotechnical strategies currently at play: carbon capture and storage, REDD+, next-generation biofuels, shale gas, short-lived climate pollutants, carbon dioxide removal, and solar radiation management. Through a framework grounded in governmentality studies, we point out common trends in how this seemingly disparate range of strategies is emerging, evolving, and taking effect."

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19.10.2020

# Media

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Boston Globe: The world needs to explore solar geoengineering as a tool to fight climate change

"As with other technologies, the risks of solar geoengineering cannot be sensibly evaluated without a scenario for goals and governance."

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12.10.2020

# Media

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World Resources Institute: Leveraging the Ocean's Carbon Removal Potential

"As the need for climate action becomes more urgent, the ocean is gaining attention as a potential part of the solution. Approaches like investing in offshore energy production, conserving coastal ecosystems and increasing consumption of sustainable ocean-based protein offer opportunities to reduce emissions. In addition to these opportunities, a range of ocean-based carbon removal approaches could help capture and store billion of tons of carbon."

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