12.01.2016

# New Publications

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Smith, Pete (2016): Soil carbon sequestration and biochar as negative emission technologies

Smith, Pete (2016): Soil carbon sequestration and biochar as negative emission technologies. In Global Change Biology. DOI 10.1111/gcb.13178.

"In this paper, I assess the potential for negative emissions from soil carbon sequestration and biochar addition to land, and also the potential global impacts on land use, water, nutrients, albedo, energy and cost. Results indicate that soil carbon sequestration and biochar have useful negative emission potential (each 0.7 GtCeq. yr−1) and that they potentially have lower impact on land, water use, nutrients, albedo, energy requirement and cost, so have fewer disadvantages than many NETs."

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04.01.2016

# New Publications

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Heck, Vera; et al. (2015): Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a ‘green’ form of geoengineering? A global modelling study

Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Boysen, Lena R. (2015): Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a ‘green’ form of geoengineering? A global modelling study. In Global and Planetary Change. DOI 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2015.12.008.

"As it is a plant-based CE option that extracts CO2 from the atmosphere, it might be considered a ‘green’ CE method that moves the biosphere closer to its natural, i.e. pre-Neolithic, state. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the biogeochemical (water- and carbon-related) changes induced by biomass plantations compared to those induced by historical human land cover and land use change. Results indicate that large-scale biomass plantations would produce a biogeochemical shift in the terrestrial biosphere which is, in absolute terms, even larger than that already produced by historical land use change."

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14.12.2015

# New Publications

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Tomei, Julia; Helliwell, Richard (2015): Food versus fuel? Going beyond biofuels

Tomei, Julia; Helliwell, Richard (2015): Food versus fuel? Going beyond biofuels. In Land Use Policy. DOI: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.11.015 

"In this paper, we use the debate on food versus fuel as a lens to examine the interdependencies between the multiple end-uses of feedstocks and the multifunctionality of land. Revealing a more nuanced understanding of the realities of agricultural networks, land use conflicts and the values of the people managing land, we argue that the simplification achieved by food versus fuel, although effective in generating public resonance that has filtered into political response, has failed to capture much that is at the heart of the issue."

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07.12.2015

# Political Papers

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Biofuelwatch (2015): Last-ditch climate option or wishful thinking? Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage

Biofuelwatch (2015): Last-ditch climate option or wishful thinking? Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage. With assistance of Almuth Ernsting, Oliver Munnion.

"The report looks in detail at the technical and economic viability of the technologies involved, at the credibility of the idea that large-scale BECCS could be carbon-negative, at the evidence regarding the reliability of carbon storage and at the greenhouse gas impacts of combining Carbon Capture and Storage with Enhanced Oil Recovery."

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07.12.2015

# Media

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International Biochar Initiative Newsletter 11.2015

"IBI Publishes V2.0 of Standards and Certification Manuals; Renewing Business and Organization Members; IBI Webinar Series December speaker announcement; Update on the IBI Online Biochar Course; Upcoming Calendar Events; Opportunities in Biochar; Recently published biochar research."

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07.12.2015

# New Publications

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Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; et al. (2015): Climate effect of an integrated wheat production and bioenergy system with Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed gasifier

Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; Elmegaard, Brian; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper (2015): Climate effect of an integrated wheat production and bioenergy system with Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed gasifier. In Applied Energy 160, pp. 511–520. DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.08.114 

"When removing biomass residues from the agriculture for bioenergy utilization, the nutrients and carbon stored within these "residual resources" are removed as-well. To mitigate these issues the energy industry must try to conserve and not destroy the nutrients. The paper analyses a novel integration between the agricultural system and the energy system through the Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed (LT-CFB) gasifier from the perspective of wheat grain production and electricity generation using wheat straw, where the effects of removing the straw from the agricultural system are assessed along with the effects of recycling the nutrients and carbon back to the agricultural system."

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05.12.2015

# Media

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Fast Co.Exist: Restoring Global Soil Quality Is One Of The Best Things We Can Do For Climate Change

"Scientists have proposed all kinds of complicated—and probably dangerous—ways to take carbon pollution out of the atmosphere or mitigate its effect. But there's actually a far simpler geo-engineering technique available to us: improving soil quality."

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22.11.2015

# Media

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New York Times: Iowa’s Climate-Change Wisdom

On bio-CDR in soil. "Despite the fact that the United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 to be “the international year of soils,” a global soil carbon sequestration campaign — one that recognizes direct links between climate mitigation, regenerative agriculture and food security — rarely ranks at the top of any high level accords, or even conversations."

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02.11.2015

# Media

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International Biochar Initiative Newsletter

News and papers on different biochar issues.

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08.10.2015

# New Publications

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Saarnio, Sanna (2015): Impacts of Biochar Amendment on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Soils

Saarnio, Sanna (2015): Impacts of Biochar Amendment on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Soils. In Zhongqi He, Fengchang Wu (Eds.): Agricultural and Environmental Applications of Biochar: Advances and Barriers. Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America, Inc (SSSA special publication, 63). Available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaspecpub63.2014.0045  

"Biochar amendment influences soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by altering the microbial transformation conditions in soils in numerous ways. Increased pH, improved nutrient availability, and additional C may increase microbial activity and the release of GHGs. On the other hand, biochar may disturb microbial processes by increasing the C-to-N ratio in the soil or by adsorbing substrates, processed products and enzymes, or by releasing compounds inhibiting microbial activity."

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