07.12.2015

# New Publications

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Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; et al. (2015): Climate effect of an integrated wheat production and bioenergy system with Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed gasifier

Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; Elmegaard, Brian; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper (2015): Climate effect of an integrated wheat production and bioenergy system with Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed gasifier. In Applied Energy 160, pp. 511–520. DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.08.114 

"When removing biomass residues from the agriculture for bioenergy utilization, the nutrients and carbon stored within these "residual resources" are removed as-well. To mitigate these issues the energy industry must try to conserve and not destroy the nutrients. The paper analyses a novel integration between the agricultural system and the energy system through the Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed (LT-CFB) gasifier from the perspective of wheat grain production and electricity generation using wheat straw, where the effects of removing the straw from the agricultural system are assessed along with the effects of recycling the nutrients and carbon back to the agricultural system."

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05.12.2015

# Media

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Fast Co.Exist: Restoring Global Soil Quality Is One Of The Best Things We Can Do For Climate Change

"Scientists have proposed all kinds of complicated—and probably dangerous—ways to take carbon pollution out of the atmosphere or mitigate its effect. But there's actually a far simpler geo-engineering technique available to us: improving soil quality."

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22.11.2015

# Media

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New York Times: Iowa’s Climate-Change Wisdom

On bio-CDR in soil. "Despite the fact that the United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 to be “the international year of soils,” a global soil carbon sequestration campaign — one that recognizes direct links between climate mitigation, regenerative agriculture and food security — rarely ranks at the top of any high level accords, or even conversations."

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02.11.2015

# Media

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International Biochar Initiative Newsletter

News and papers on different biochar issues.

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08.10.2015

# New Publications

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Saarnio, Sanna (2015): Impacts of Biochar Amendment on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Soils

Saarnio, Sanna (2015): Impacts of Biochar Amendment on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Soils. In Zhongqi He, Fengchang Wu (Eds.): Agricultural and Environmental Applications of Biochar: Advances and Barriers. Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America, Inc (SSSA special publication, 63). Available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaspecpub63.2014.0045  

"Biochar amendment influences soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by altering the microbial transformation conditions in soils in numerous ways. Increased pH, improved nutrient availability, and additional C may increase microbial activity and the release of GHGs. On the other hand, biochar may disturb microbial processes by increasing the C-to-N ratio in the soil or by adsorbing substrates, processed products and enzymes, or by releasing compounds inhibiting microbial activity."

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13.09.2015

# New Publications

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Ok, Yŏng-sik (Ed.) (2015): Biochar. Production, characterization, and applications

Ok, Yŏng-sik (Ed.) (2015): Biochar. Production, characterization, and applications. Boca Raton: CRC Press (Urbanization, industrialization, and the environment).

"Encompassing high priority research areas such as bioenergy production, global warming mitigation, and sustainable agriculture, biochar has received increased worldwide interest in the past decade."

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11.09.2015

# New Publications

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An, Chunjiang; Huang, Gordon (2015): Environmental concern on biochar. Capture, then what?

An, Chunjiang; Huang, Gordon (2015): Environmental concern on biochar. Capture, then what? In Environ Earth Sci. DOI: 10.1007/s12665-015-4741-8 

"Biochar tends to become the sink of soil pollutants. The changing soil environment can result in the release of toxic compounds from biochar in the long term. Biochar can be deactivated by clogged pores or decreasing sorption capacity."

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20.08.2015

# New Publications

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Bozzi, E.; et al. (2015): Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes

Bozzi, E.; Genesio, L.; Toscano, P.; Pieri, M.; Miglietta, F. (2015): Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes. In Environ. Res. Lett. 10 (8), p. 84014–84014. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/10/8/084014

"However, some side effects of large-scale biochar application need to be investigated. In particular a massive use of a low-reflecting material on large cropland areas may impact the climate via changes in surface albedo. Twelve years of MODIS-derived albedo data were analysed for three pairs of selected agricultural sites in central Italy."

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18.08.2015

# Media

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Biochar Journal: Anatomy of a Field Trial: Wood-based Biochar and Compost Influences a Pacific Northwest Soil

"The discovery of elevated fertility of the Amazonian Terra Preta soils was widely reported in the news media starting in 2006, coinciding with the initial public awareness of the existential threat of climate change. Small groups of people worldwide seized on the idea of Terra Preta and biochar as a climate solution, and began to publicize and act on the promise of biochar."

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05.06.2015

# Media

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Nova Next: The Coal That’s Good for the Climate

"But biochar has another trick up its sleeve. By retaining carbon even after combustion, it may not just help boost Diatta’s low yields. Some researchers believe it could be part of a solution to climate change, one of the most intractable problems of our era."

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