10.04.2020

# New Publications

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Dissanayake, Pavani Dulanja; et al. 2020: “Sustainable Gasification Biochar as a High Efficiency Adsorbent for CO2 Capture: A Facile Method to Designer Biochar Fabrication.”

Dissanayake, Pavani Dulanja, Seung Wan Choi, Avanthi Deshani Igalavithana, Xiao Yang, Daniel C.W. Tsang, Chi-Hwa Wang, Harn Wei Kua, Ki Bong Lee, and Yong Sik Ok. 2020: “Sustainable Gasification Biochar as a High Efficiency Adsorbent for CO2 Capture: A Facile Method to Designer Biochar Fabrication.” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 124 (May): 109785. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2020.109785.

"Biochars can be a potential means of CO2 capture if designed with hierarchical structures and suitable surface properties. Objective of this research was to assess the effectiveness of KOH activation and a combination of KOH and CO2 activation for enhancing the CO2 adsorption capacity of gasification biochar."

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10.04.2020

# New Publications

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Williams, Elizabeth K.; et al. 2019: “Effects of 7 Years of Field Weathering on Biochar Recalcitrance and Solubility.”

Williams, Elizabeth K., Davey L. Jones, Hannah R. Sanders, Gabriel V. Benitez, and Alain F. Plante. 2019: “Effects of 7 Years of Field Weathering on Biochar Recalcitrance and Solubility.” Biochar 1 (3): 237–48. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42773-019-00026-1.

"How weathering affects the physiochemical properties of biochar and its long-term carbon (C) sequestration potential remains unclear. In this study, we measured changes in biochar recalcitrance and solubility after 7 years of weathering in a cultivated field."

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09.03.2020

# Media

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Project Drawdown: Review 2020

"Project Drawdown conducts an ongoing review and analysis of climate solutions—the practices and technologies that can stem and begin to reduce the excess of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere—to provide the world with a current and robust resource."

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24.02.2020

# Media

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Blog: Peter Winsley: Economic opportunities for biochar in New Zealand

"New Zealand needs to quickly adapt scientific advances in biochar research, both domestic and international, and apply them to our own opportunities. In doing so, biochar can be a key part of our climate change response, while also lifting our productivity and sustainability."

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27.01.2020

# Political Papers

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Biofuelwatch (2020): What have we learned about biochar since 2011?

Biofuelwatch (2020): What have we learned about biochar since 2011? Update by Rachel Smolker, January 2020.

"What we have concluded from that review is that 1 ) there has been a massive proliferation of studies of biochar over the past several years reflecting a greatly expanded interest and an influx of funding to soil science researchers. 2) There has been a widening of the scope of proclaimed “uses” for biochar – no longer just for carbon sequestration, but now for many other applications including increasing water retention in soils, improving nutrient uptake in agriculture, reducing fertilizer use and reducing emissions from fertilizer applications, use as feed for cattle to reduce methane emissions, and more."

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12.08.2019

# New Publications

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Wu, Z.; et al. (2019): Biochar can mitigate methane emissions by improving methanotrophs for prolonged period in fertilized paddy soils

Wu, Z.; Song, Y.; Shen, H.; Jiang, X.; Li, B.; Xiong, Z. (2019): Biochar can mitigate methane emissions by improving methanotrophs for prolonged period in fertilized paddy soils. In: Environmental Pollution 253, S. 1038–1046. DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2019.07.073.

"Biochar application to fertilized paddy soils has been recommended as an effective countermeasure to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions, but its mechanism and effective duration has not yet been adequately elucidated. A laboratory incubation experiment was performed to gain insight into the combined effects of fresh and six-year aged biochar on potential methane oxidation (PMO) in paddy soils with ammonium or nitrate-amendment."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Zhang, C.; et al. (2019): Biochar for environmental management. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, contaminant treatment, and potential negative impacts

Zhang, C.; Zeng, G.; Huang, D.; Lai, C.; Chen, M.; Cheng, M. et al. (2019): Biochar for environmental management. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, contaminant treatment, and potential negative impacts. In: Chemical Engineering Journal 373, S. 902–922. DOI: 10.1016/j.cej.2019.05.139.

"This review provides new insights into the state-of-the-art accomplishments in the utilization of biochar in environmental management and covers three perspectives: firstly, mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, such as sequestration of CO2 and CH4 in global carbon pools and mitigation of N2O emissions; secondly, pollution control, including adsorptive removal and reactive removal of inorganic and organic contaminants; thirdly, potential negative aspects of biochar applications, including contaminations originated from biochar, negative alterations to soil properties and soil biota, negative impacts of biochar on GHG emissions and negative impacts of biochar migration."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Snyder, B. (2019): Costs of biomass pyrolysis as a negative emission technology: A case study

Snyder, B. (2019): Costs of biomass pyrolysis as a negative emission technology: A case study. In: Int J Energy Res 40 (7), S. 940. DOI: 10.1002/er.4361.

"Biomass pyrolysis is a promising method for the creation of biochar, a potentially long‐lived carbon sink, and renewable fuels. While a number of studies of the costs of pyrolysis exist, many fail to value the carbon storage benefit associated with biochar. Here, we evaluate the costs of three types of small‐scale pyrolysis systems (slow and fast, compared with gasification) in Costa Rica. We find that under many combinations of model parameters, fast and slow pyrolysis models are cost‐effective."

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26.11.2018

# Media

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Bay Journal: Biochar could be the hot new thing in addressing Bay’s poultry litter

"West Virginia farmer Josh Frye raises chickens for a meat processor and sells most of their manure to nearby crop growers for use as fertilizer. But what he does with the rest of the manure could help tackle two big environmental problems: cutting back nutrient pollution in the Chesapeake Bay and reducing carbon emissions that accelerate global warming."

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08.10.2018

# Media

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Vimeo: ‘Dirt Rich’ — The Importance of Biochar and Regenerative Systems for Soil Health

"Dirt Rich shifts focus from greenhouse gas emissions to carbon drawdown which is the only viable solution for reversing the effects of runaway global warming in a timely manner. Through exploration of geo-therapy strategies, Dirt Rich shines a light on their value and beauty which undeniably are our last hope for protecting life as we know it on this challenged planet. Through regenerative agricultural practices, reforestation of abandoned land, protection/restoration of carbon-rich wetlands and keystone species, Dirt Rich illustrates how implementing these strategies will return our atmosphere to safe levels of carbon while growing soil, our most precious resource."

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