09.10.2020

# New Publications

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Feng, Ellias Yuming; et al. (2020): Geoengineered Ocean Vertical Water Exchange Can Accelerate Global Deoxygenation

Feng, Ellias Yuming; Su, Bei; Oschlies, Andreas (2020): Geoengineered Ocean Vertical Water Exchange Can Accelerate Global Deoxygenation. Geophysical Research Letters, 47(16). In Geophysical Research Letters 47 (16). DOI: 10.1029/2020GL088263.

"Ocean deoxygenation is a threat to marine ecosystems. We evaluated the potential of two ocean intervention technologies, that is, “artificial downwelling (AD)” and “artificial upwelling (AU),” for remedying the expansion of Oxygen Deficient Zones (ODZs)."

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23.09.2020

# New Publications

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Sawall, Yvonne; et al. (2020): Discrete Pulses of Cooler Deep Water Can Decelerate Coral Bleaching During Thermal Stress: Implications for Artificial Upwelling During Heat Stress Events

Sawall, Yvonne; Harris, Moronke; Lebrato, Mario; Wall, Marlene; Feng, Ellias Yuming (2020): Discrete Pulses of Cooler Deep Water Can Decelerate Coral Bleaching During Thermal Stress: Implications for Artificial Upwelling During Heat Stress Events. In Front. Mar. Sci. 7, p. 720. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00720.

"Artificial upwelling of cooler deep water to the surface layer may be a possible mitigation/management tool. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated artificial upwelling with deep water off Bermuda collected at 50 m (24°C) and 100 m (20°C) on coral symbiont biology of 3 coral species (Montastrea cavernosaPorites astreoides, and Pseudodiploria strigosa) in a temperature stress experiment."

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28.08.2020

# Media

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Wiener Zeitung: Which luxuries do we want to afford ourselves?

German-language interview with Dr. Martin Visbek of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (Head of the Physical Oceanography Unit).

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30.09.2019

# New Publications

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Pan, YiWen; et al. (2019): A sea trial of air-lift concept artificial upwelling in the East China Sea

Pan, YiWen; Li, Yifan; Fan, Wei; Zhang, DaHai; Qiang, Yongfa; Jiang, ZongPei; Chen, Ying (2019): A sea trial of air-lift concept artificial upwelling in the East China Sea. In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. DOI: 10.1175/JTECH-D-18-0238.1.

"In this work, a sea-trial of an air-lift concept AU system driven by self-powered energy was carried out in the East China Sea (ECS) (30°8′14″N, 122°44′59″E) to assess the logistics of at-sea deployment and the durability of the equipment under extremely complex hydrodynamic condition from Sep 3rd to 7th, 2014."

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07.07.2016

# Media

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Think Progress: Can Kelp Save The Pacific Ocean?

On artificial upwelling and other maritime sequestration. "When it comes to ocean acidification, the Pacific Northwest is set to be ground zero for some of the most dire impacts — so it makes sense that scientists in Washington state would be on the forefront of research aimed at finding solutions."

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17.01.2016

# New Publications

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Pan, YiWen; et al. (2015): Research progress in artificial upwelling and its potential environmental effects

Pan, YiWen; Fan, Wei; Zhang, DaHai; Chen, JiaWang; Huang, HaoCai; Liu, ShuXia et al. (2015): Research progress in artificial upwelling and its potential environmental effects. In Sci. China Earth Sci. DOI 10.1007/s11430-015-5195-2.

"We reviewed the current knowledge on the development of an artificial upwelling system and its potential environmental effects. Special attention was given to the research progress on the air-lift concept artificial upwelling by Zhejiang University. The research on artificial upwelling over the past few decades has generated a range of devices that have been successfully applied in the field for months."

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03.05.2014

# Media

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Phys.org: Scientists develop feedback technique to manage uncertainties in solar geoengineering

Media response to Kravitz, Ben; et al. (2014). "Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Caltech and Lancaster University took advantage of this "what-if" proving ground by inserting a unique feedback loop into a climate model to react to theoretical climate engineering techniques."

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