10.09.2021

# Media

0 Comments

Video: Open Air: This Is CDR EP06: SEA MATE with Matthew Eisaman, PhD

"For this episode of This Is CDR we are pleased to welcome Dr. Matthew Eisaman (Stony Brook University) to review the oceanic carbonate cycle and present SEA MATE, an electrochemical alkalinity enhancement and CDR process he is developing."

LINK


Read more »

08.09.2021

# Political Papers

0 Comments

Romany M. Webb, et al. (2021): Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation. Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Columbia Law School: Sabin Centre for Climate Change Law

Romany M. Webb, Korey Silverman-Roati (2021): Removing Carbon Dioxide Through Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement and Seaweed Cultivation. Legal Challenges and Opportunities. Columbia Law School: Sabin Centre for Climate Change Law. New York. Available online at https://climate.law.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/Webb%20et%20al%20-%20Removing%20CO2%20Through%20Ocean%20Alkalinity%20Enhancement%.

"This paper explores two ocean-based carbon dioxide removal strategies—ocean alkalinity enhancement and seaweed cultivation. Ocean alkalinity enhancement involves adding alkalinity to ocean waters, either by discharging alkaline rocks or through an electrochemical process, which increases ocean pH levels and thereby enables greater uptake of carbon dioxide, as well as reducing the adverse impacts of ocean acidification. Seaweed cultivation involves the growing of kelp and other macroalgae to store carbon in biomass, which can then either be used to replace more greenhouse gas-intensive products or sequestered. This paper examines the international and U.S. legal frameworks that apply to ocean alkalinity enhancement and seaweed cultivation. Depending on where they occur, such activities may be subject to international, national, state, and/or local jurisdiction."

LINK


Read more »

08.04.2021

# New Publications

0 Comments

Caserini, Stefano; et al. (2021): Potential of Maritime Transport for Ocean Liming and Atmospheric CO2 Removal

Caserini, Stefano; Pagano, Dario; Campo, Francesco; Abbà, Antonella; Marco, Serena de; Righi, Davide et al. (2021): Potential of Maritime Transport for Ocean Liming and Atmospheric CO2 Removal. In Front. Clim. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fclim.2021.575900.

"In this study, the potential of discharging calcium hydroxide (slaked lime, SL) using existing maritime transport is evaluated, at the global scale and for the Mediterranean Sea."

LINK


Read more »

18.03.2021

# New Publications

0 Comments

Butenschön, Momme; et al. (2021): Alkalinization Scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea for Efficient Removal of Atmospheric CO2 and the Mitigation of Ocean Acidification

Butenschön, Momme; Lovato, Tomas; Masina, Simona; Caserini, Stefano; Grosso, Mario (2021): Alkalinization Scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea for Efficient Removal of Atmospheric CO2 and the Mitigation of Ocean Acidification. In Front. Clim. 3, p. 14. DOI: 10.3389/fclim.2021.614537.

"This study investigates the case of ocean alkalinization, which has the additional potential of contrasting the ongoing acidification resulting from increased uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the seas. More specifically, we present an analysis of marine alkalinization applied to the Mediterranean Sea taking into consideration the regional characteristics of the basin."

LINK


Read more »

24.08.2020

# New Publications

0 Comments

Burns, Wil; Corbett, Charles R. (2020): Antacids for the Sea? Artificial Ocean Alkalinization and Climate Change

Burns, Wil; Corbett, Charles R. (2020): Antacids for the Sea? Artificial Ocean Alkalinization and Climate Change. In One Earth 3 (2), pp. 154–156. DOI: 10.1016/j.oneear.2020.07.016.

"There is increasing urgency for large-scale deployment of carbon-removal approaches to help avoid passing critical climatic thresholds. Given the severe risks of many terrestrial methods at extremely large scales, there is a compelling need to also assess the potential of marine negative-emissions technologies, such as artificial ocean alkalinization."

LINK


Read more »

16.03.2020

# Media

0 Comments

Video: Assessing Carbon Removal webinar series: Governance of Marine Geoengineering

"In this webinar, Kerryn Brent, University of Adelaide; Wil Burns, Co-Director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy; and Jeffrey McGee, University of Tasmania will discuss the potential role of marine climate geoengineering approaches such as ocean alkalinity enhancement and "blue carbon." Focusing on the governance of marine geoengineering research and deployment, along with potential risks of this approach, this webinar come on the heels of CIGI's Special Report on the topic authored by Brent, Burns, and McGee."

LINK


Read more »

30.09.2019

# Media

0 Comments

SHZ: With stones against climate change?

German newspaper article on ocean-based CDR research at GEOMAR.

LINK


Read more »

25.01.2018

# New Publications

0 Comments

Sonntag, Sebastian; et al. (2018): Quantifying and comparing effects of climate engineering methods on the Earth system

Sonntag, Sebastian; González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana; Kracher, Daniela; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Niemeier, Ulrike et al. (2018): Quantifying and comparing effects of climate engineering methods on the Earth system. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000620.

"To contribute to a quantitative comparison of climate engineering (CE) methods, we assess atmosphere-, ocean-, and land-based CE measures with respect to Earth system effects consistently within one comprehensive model. We use the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) with prognostic carbon cycle to compare solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection and two carbon dioxide removal methods: afforestation and ocean alkalinization. The CE model experiments are designed to offset the effect of fossil-fuel burning on global mean surface air temperature under the RCP8.5 scenario to follow or get closer to the RCP4.5 scenario."

LINK


Read more »

17.12.2017

# New Publications

0 Comments

Feng, E. Y.; et al. (2017): Model-based Assessment of the CO2 Sequestration Potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization

Feng, E. Y.; Koeve, W.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A. (2017): Model-based Assessment of the CO2 Sequestration Potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000659.

"The potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization (COA), a carbon dioxide removal (CDR) climate engineering strategy that chemically increases ocean carbon uptake and storage, is investigated with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. The CDR potential and possible environmental side effects are estimated for various COA deployment scenarios, assuming olivine as the alkalinity source in ice-free coastal waters (about 8.6% of the global ocean's surface area), with dissolution rates being a function of grain size, ambient seawater temperature and pH. Our results indicate that for a large-enough olivine deployment of small-enough grain sizes (10 μm), atmospheric CO2 could be reduced by more than 800 GtC by the year 2100."

LINK


Read more »

20.11.2017

# New Publications

0 Comments

Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam (2017): Climate engineering by enhancement of ocean alkalinity: impacts on the Earth system and a comparison with solar radiation management

Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam (2017): Climate engineering by enhancement of ocean alkalinity: impacts on the Earth system and a comparison with solar radiation management. PhD Thesis. Edited by Universität Hamburg. Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie. Hamburg (Reports on Earth System Science, 193).

"For the rst time, the CE-driven e ects on the Earth system of large-scale AOA and SRM scenarios are consistently compared in a comprehensive Earth system model with interactive carbon cycle. Using the Max Planck Institute Earth
System Model (MPI-ESM) forced by fossil-fuel CO2 emissions, I explore the impacts of these CE methods on the global carbon uptake and ocean biogeochemistry. I design and run AOA scenarios that reduce atmospheric CO2 levels to the trajectory of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 in a high CO2 world following the RCP8.5 scenario."

LINK


Read more »