07.10.2021

# Media

0 Comments

Deccan Herald: Reducing global warming: Could reflecting sunlight back into space work?

"One of the most important geoengineering options is Solar Radiation Management (SRM). SRM aims at reflecting inbound sunlight back into space, reducing the amount of heat absorbed by the earth and lowering global temperatures."

LINK


Read more »

04.10.2021

# New Publications

0 Comments

Goode, P. R.; et al. (2021): Earth's Albedo 1998–2017 as Measured From Earthshine

Goode, P. R.; Pallé, E.; Shoumko, A.; Shoumko, S.; Montañes‐Rodriguez, P.; Koonin, S. E. (2021): Earth's Albedo 1998–2017 as Measured From Earthshine. In Geophysical Research Letters 48 (17). DOI: 10.1029/2021GL094888.

"The reflectance of the Earth is a fundamental climate parameter that we measured from Big Bear Solar Observatory between 1998 and 2017 by observing the earthshine using modern photometric techniques to precisely determine daily, monthly, seasonal, yearly and decadal changes in terrestrial albedo from earthshine. We find the inter-annual fluctuations in albedo to be global, while the large variations in albedo within individual nights and seasonal wanderings tend to average out over each year. We measure a gradual, but climatologically significant urn:x-wiley:00948276:media:grl62955:grl62955-math-00010.5 W/m2 decline in the global albedo over the two decades of data. We found no correlation between the changes in the terrestrial albedo and measures of solar activity. The inter-annual pattern of earthshine fluctuations are in good agreement with those measured by CERES (data began in 2001) even though the satellite observations are sensitive to retroflected light while earthshine is sensitive to wide-angle reflectivity. The CERES decline is about twice that of earthshine."

LINK


Read more »

12.08.2021

# New Publications

0 Comments

Fleming, James Rodger (2021): Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Intervention

Fleming, J.R. (2021): Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Intervention. In: Pulé P.M., Hultman M. (eds) Men, Masculinities, and Earth. Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-54486-7_24

"As alarm over global warming spreads, a radical idea is taking hold. An emerging breed of so-called climate engineers is promoting invasive techniques to cool the planet through albedo modification and so-called “negative carbon emissions” will be necessary. While these proposals seem edgy and exciting, they often test the limits of scientific, technological, and institutional possibility and overlook the political, ethical, and social consequences of managing the world’s climate. Advocates of climate engineering, with vanishingly few exceptions, are Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) males with superman complexes. Their views are short-sighted, dangerous, and “barking mad.” This chapter provides historical perspectives, social context, and a gendered analysis of these dangerous proposals."

LINK


Read more »

21.06.2021

# Media

0 Comments

Phys.org: A brighter future: How whitening the Wheatbelt could cool the climate

"Like an enormous mirror, those crops bounce solar radiation back out to space. That means WA's Wheatbelt—and the wheat growing there—could become a crucial part of how southwestern WA adapts to climate change."

LINK


Read more »

21.06.2021

# New Publications

0 Comments

Kala, Jatin; Hirsch, Annette L. (2020): Could crop albedo modification reduce regional warming over Australia?

Kala, Jatin; Hirsch, Annette L. (2020): Could crop albedo modification reduce regional warming over Australia? In Weather and Climate Extremes 30, p. 100282. DOI: 10.1016/j.wace.2020.100282.

"We use a regional climate model at 10 km resolution, to show that crop albedo enhancement of up to 0.1 could reduce monthly mean daily maximum temperatures by −1.0 °C to −1.2 °C, and monthly highest maximum temperatures by up to −1.4 °C to −1.6 °C during the cropping season."

LINK


Read more »

19.04.2021

# Media

0 Comments

Phys.org: Geotextiles could slow glacial melt, but at what cost?

"In the Swiss Alps, some ski resorts and glacial tourist attractions are using reflective blankets known as geotextiles to protect parts of glaciers from accelerated summer melt caused by global warming."

LINK


Read more »

19.04.2021

# Media

0 Comments

The Guardian: Whitest-ever paint could help cool heating Earth, study shows

"New paint reflects 98% of sunlight as well as radiating infrared heat into space, reducing need for air conditioning."

LINK


Read more »

22.03.2021

# Political Papers

0 Comments

C2G Policy Brief (2021): Climate-Altering Approaches and the Arctic

C2G Policy Brief (2021): Climate-Altering Approaches  and the Arctic. 17th March 2021 - 2nd Edition.

"The Arctic plays a key role in the global climate system. Current commitments made under the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change are insufficient to keep global warming to ‘well below’ 2°C, and according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), much greater ambition is necessary."

LINK


Read more »

11.03.2021

# Projects

0 Comments

Project: Arctic Ice Project

"The most studied ice restoration effort in the world. We’re developing a safe, localized technique to enhance the Arctic’s natural ability to reflect solar radiation out of the atmosphere, increase the Earth’s planetary albedo, and slow the rate of global warming."

LINK


Read more »

21.12.2020

# New Publications

0 Comments

Zhao, Mengying; et al. (2020): Climate more responsive to marine cloud brightening than ocean albedo modification: A model study

Zhao, Mengying; Cao, Long; Duan, Lei; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken (2020): Climate more responsive to marine cloud brightening than ocean albedo modification: A model study. In Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. DOI: 10.1029/2020JD033256.

"Marine cloud brightening (MCB) and ocean albedo modification (OAM) are two proposed approaches to intentionally reflect sunlight back to space over oceanic regions. Using the NCAR Community Earth System Model, we compare climate response to MCB and OAM under the framework of fast adjustment and slow feedback."

LINK


Read more »