13.08.2018

# New Publications

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Hamilton, D. S.; et al. (2018): Reassessment of pre-industrial fire emissions strongly affects anthropogenic aerosol forcing

Hamilton, D. S.; Hantson, S.; Scott, C. E.; Kaplan, J. O.; Pringle, K. J.; Nieradzik, L. P. et al. (2018): Reassessment of pre-industrial fire emissions strongly affects anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In: nature communications 9 (1), S. 3182. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-05592-9.

"Uncertainty in pre-industrial natural aerosol emissions is a major component of the overall uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate. Improved characterisation of natural emissions and their radiative effects can therefore increase the accuracy of global climate model projections. Here we show that revised assumptions about pre-industrial fire activity result in significantly increased aerosol concentrations in the pre-industrial atmosphere."

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10.08.2018

# Media

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Berkeley News: Blocking sunlight to cool Earth won’t reduce crop damage from global warming

"Injecting particles into the atmosphere to cool the planet and counter the warming effects of climate change would do nothing to offset the crop damage from rising global temperatures, according to a new analysis by University of California, Berkeley, researchers."

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10.08.2018

# Media

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Der Standard: Cooling haze has no effect (German)

German article an CE.

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09.08.2018

# Media

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Independent: Major plan to deal with climate change by geoengineering the Earth would not work, scientists reveal

"The Earth could not be changed to save the environment, according to a new paper exploring the possibilities of "geoengineering" the planet to protect us from the worst effects of climate change."

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Mueller, B. L.; et al. (2018): Attribution of Arctic sea ice decline from 1953 to 2012 to influences from natural, greenhouse-gas and anthropogenic aerosol forcing

Mueller, B. L.; Gillett, N. P.; Monahan, A. H.; Zwiers, F. W. (2018): Attribution of Arctic sea ice decline from 1953 to 2012 to influences from natural, greenhouse-gas and anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In: J. Climate. DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0552.1.

"We show that fingerprints from greenhouse-gas, natural and other anthropogenic forcings are detected in the three observed records of Arctic sea ice extent. Beyond that, our findings indicate that for the 1953 to 2012 period roughly 23% of the greenhouse-gas induced negative sea ice trend has been offset by a weak positive sea ice trend attributable to other anthropogenic forcing. We show that our detection and attribution results remain robust in the presence of emerging non-stationary internal climate variability acting upon sea ice using a perfect model experiment and data from two large ensembles of climate simulations."

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04.08.2018

# Media

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The Guardian: Pollution is slowing the melting of Arctic sea ice, for now

"The authors concluded that the combined cooling effect from human aerosols was detected in all three datasets of ice. That means, it didn’t matter whose measurements you used – the effect of aerosol cooling was present."

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30.07.2018

# Media

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Red Green and Blue: Six ideas to limit global warming with solar geoengineering (Part 1)

"Scientists agree that cutting global greenhouse emissions as soon as possible will be key to tackling global warming. But, with global emissions still on the rise, some researchers are now calling for more research into measures that could be taken alongside emissions cuts, including – controversially – the use of “solar geoengineering” technologies."

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23.07.2018

# New Publications

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Muri, Helene; et al (2018): Climate Response to Aerosol Geoengineering. A Multimethod Comparison

Muri, Helene; Tjiputra, Jerry; Otterå, Odd Helge; Adakudlu, Muralidhar; Lauvset, Siv K.; Grini, Alf et al. (2018): Climate Response to Aerosol Geoengineering. A Multimethod Comparison. In: J. Climate 31 (16), S. 6319–6340. DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0620.1.

"Considering the ambitious climate targets of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 2°C, with aspirations of even 1.5°C, questions arise on how to achieve this. Climate geoengineering has been proposed as a potential tool to minimize global harm from anthropogenic climate change. Here, an Earth system model is used to evaluate the climate response when transferring from a high CO2 forcing scenario, RCP8.5, to a middle-of-the-road forcing scenario, like RCP4.5, using aerosol geoengineering. Three different techniques are considered: stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI), marine sky brightening (MSB), and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT)."

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06.07.2018

# Media

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Scientific American: The Best Way to Shade Earth

"A new study of a proposed geoengineering technique to artificially shade the Earth shows that troublesome side effects could be minimized by injecting particles into the atmosphere from points on the planet farther away from the equator."

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04.07.2018

# New Publications

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Wang, Qin; et al. (2018): A statistical examination of the effects of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on tropical storm genesis.

Wang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ji, Duoying (2018): A statistical examination of the effects of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on tropical storm genesis. In: Atmos. Chem. Phys 18 (13), S. 9173–9188. DOI: 10.5194/acp-18-9173-2018.

"The thermodynamics of the ocean and atmosphere partly determine variability in tropical cyclone (TC) numberand intensity and are readily accessible from climate model output, but an accurate description of TC variability requiresmuch higher spatial and temporal resolution than the models used in the GeoMIP (Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project) experiments provide. The genesis potential index (GPI) and ventilation index (VI) are combinations of dynamic and thermodynamic variables that provide proxiesfor TC activity under different climate states. Here we use five CMIP5 models that have run the RCP4.5 experiment and the GeoMIP stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) G4 experiment to calculate the two TC indices over the 2020 to 2069 period across the six ocean basins that generate TCs."

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