05.05.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Lee, H.; et al. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination

Lee, H.; Ekici, A.; Tjiputra, J.; Muri, H.; Chadburn, S.; Lawrence, D.; Schwinger, J. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF001146.

"Climate engineering arises as one of the potential methods that could contribute to meeting the 1.5oC global warming target agreed under the Paris Agreement. We examine how permafrost and high latitude vegetation respond to large scale implementation of climate engineering. Specifically, we explore the impacts of applying the solar radiation management method of stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI) on permafrost temperature and the global extent of near‐surface permafrost area."

LINK


Read more »

11.02.2019

# Media

0 Comments

Chatham House: Cool idea or hi-tech madness?

"As the threat from climate change looms ever larger, growing attention is being paid to proposals that sound as if they come straight from a sci-fi novel. One idea is to spray the stratosphere with particulates to reflect sunlight, thus reducing the temperature of planet Earth."

LINK


Read more »

11.02.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Wang, W.; Kravitz, B.; Tilmes, S.; Richter, J.; Mills, M. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering. In: J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 41 (3), S. 1738. DOI: 10.1029/2018JD028906.

"Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering could be used to maintain global mean temperature despite increased atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, for example, to meet a 1.5 or 2 °C target. While this might reduce many climate change impacts, the resulting climate would not be the same as one with the same global mean temperature due to lower GHG concentrations. The primary question we consider is how long it would take to detect these differences in a hypothetical deployment. We use a 20‐member ensemble of stratospheric sulfate aerosol geoengineering simulations in which SO2 is injected at four different latitudes to maintain not just the global mean temperature, but also the interhemispheric and equator‐to‐pole gradients."

LINK


Read more »

11.02.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Svoboda, T.; et al. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice

Svoboda, T.; Irvine, P.; Callies, D.; Sugiyama, M. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice. In: Journal of Global Ethics 15 (16), S. 1–16. DOI: 10.1080/17449626.2018.1552180.

"Climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections (SSAI) has the potential to reduce risks of injustice related to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Relying on evidence from modeling studies, this paper makes the case that SSAI could have the potential to reduce many of the key physical risks of climate change identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Such risks carry potential injustice because they are often imposed on low-emitters who do not benefit from climate change."

LINK


Read more »

11.02.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Sato, Y.; et al. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness?

Sato, Y.; Suzuki, K. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness? In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 363 (6427), S. 580–581. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw3720.

"Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere that originate from sources such as agricultural waste, forest fires, sea spray (see the photo), desert dust, and industrial pollution. They alter the energy balance of Earth's climate system through direct reflection and absorption of solar radiation as well as through modulating cloud properties by serving as nuclei for cloud particles."

LINK


Read more »

27.01.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Rosenfeld, D.; et al. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds

Rosenfeld, D.; Zhu, Y.; Wang, M.; Zheng, Y.; Goren, T.; Yu, S. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds. In: Science (New York, N.Y.). DOI: 10.1126/science.aav0566.

"Lack of reliable estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) aerosols over oceans has severely limited our ability to quantify their effects on cloud properties and extent of cooling by reflecting solar radiation – a key uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing. Here we introduce a methodology for ascribing cloud properties to CCN and isolating the aerosol effects from meteorological effects."

LINK


Read more »

14.01.2019

# Media

0 Comments

Phys.org: Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research

"Simply reducing greenhouse gas emissions probably is not going to be sufficient for the planet to escape catastrophic damage from climate change, scientists say. Additional actions will be required, and one option is solar geoengineering, which could lower temperatures by methods such as reflecting sunlight away from the Earth through the deployment of aerosols in the stratosphere. However, the prospect of experimenting with the Earth's atmosphere has left some people skeptical of the process."

LINK


Read more »

14.01.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Kravitz, B. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1811022116.

"The last decade has seen broad exploratory research into stratospheric aerosol (SA) geoengineering, motivated by concern that reducing greenhouse gas emissions may be insufficient to avoid significant impacts from climate change. [...] We highlight two important observations that follow from considering such a comprehensive, prioritized natural-science research effort. First, while field experiments may eventually be needed to reduce some of the uncertainties, we expect that the next phase of research will continue to be primarily model-based, with one outcome being to assess and prioritize which uncertainties need to be reduced (and, as a corollary, which field experiments can reduce those uncertainties). Second, we anticipate a clear separation in scale and character between small-scale experimental research to resolve specific process uncertainties and global-scale activities."

LINK


Read more »

06.01.2019

# Media

0 Comments

E&E News: Here's the research to watch in 2019

"Amid concern about the Paris Agreement's rapidly approaching global climate targets, geoengineering is a growing area of focus. One widely discussed, but highly controversial, hypothetical proposal involves spraying reflective aerosols into the atmosphere to beam sunlight away and cool the planet. It's called solar radiation management, or solar geoengineering."

LINK


Read more »

17.12.2018

# New Publications

0 Comments

Possner, A.; et al. (2018): The efficacy of aerosol–cloud radiative perturbations from near-surface emissions in deep open-cell stratocumuli

Possner, A.; Wang, H.; Wood, R.; Caldeira, K.; Ackerman, T. (2018): The efficacy of aerosol–cloud radiative perturbations from near-surface emissions in deep open-cell stratocumuli. In: Atmos. Chem. Phys 18 (23), S. 17475–17488. DOI: 10.5194/acp-18-17475-2018.

"We show that a spatially coherent cloud perturbation is not evident along the emission line. Yet our model simulates an increase in domain-mean all-sky albedo of 0.05, corresponding to a diurnally averaged cloud radiative effect of 20 W m−2, given the annual mean solar insolation at the VOCALS-REx site. Therefore, marked changes in cloud radiative properties in precipitating deep open cells may be driven by anthropogenic near-surface aerosol perturbations, such as those generated by ships."

LINK


Read more »