12.08.2019

# New Publications

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Duan, L.; et al. (2019): Climate Response to Pulse Versus Sustained Stratospheric Aerosol Forcing

Duan, L.; Cao, L.; Bala, G.; Caldeira, K. (2019): Climate Response to Pulse Versus Sustained Stratospheric Aerosol Forcing. In: Geophys. Res. Lett., S. 1. DOI: 10.1029/2019GL083701.

"Solar geoengineering has been suggested as a potential means to counteract anthropogenic warming. Major volcanic eruptions have been used as natural analogues to large‐scale deployments of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, yet difference in climate responses to these forcings remains unclear."

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29.07.2019

# Media

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Forum for Climate Engineering: Researching at the Top of a Slippery Slope?

"Does researching geoengineering—specifically, stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI)—lead us onto a slippery slope, at the bottom of which awaits the deployment of a morally objectionable technology? Should we perhaps abandon research now on account of the possibility that we’ll slide down such a slope? In a recent publication, I argued that we should be cognizant of the possibility for research into SAI to lead to objectionable deployment scenarios."

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08.07.2019

# Media

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BBC Science Focus: Could geoengineering cause a climate war?

"If cutting greenhouse gas emissions isn’t enough, is it time for a plan B? Recent times have seen a surge of interest in geoengineering: China has recently embarked on a substantial research plan, while in the US, Prof David Keith of Harvard University is planning to launch a high-altitude balloon this year to test the feasibility of spraying reflective particles into the stratosphere."

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08.07.2019

# Media

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E&E News: Risks of Controversial Geoengineering Approach “May Be Overstated”

"Some scientists are finding fewer risks related to solar geoengineering than determined in earlier studies, adding emphasis to calls for a global body to monitor proposals that would inject substances into the upper atmosphere to reflect sunlight away from Earth."

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27.05.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: Aerosol Approaches to Climate Engineering. Robert Dickinson Symposium (AMS100)

Deadline: 1. August 2019

"This joint session covers broad topics such as results from climate modeling, using analogs such as volcanic eruptions and ship tracks, and development of technology to actually implement solar geoengineering. Papers on the physics of climate engineering should be submitted to this joint session, and on ethical and governance issues related to climate engineering to the session "Ethics and governance of weather modification and geoengineering" at the 22nd Conference on Planned and Inadvertent Weather Modification. Invited keynote speaker: Simone Tilmes (NCAR). Session Chair: Alan Robock (Rutgers University)."

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05.05.2019

# New Publications

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Lee, H.; et al. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination

Lee, H.; Ekici, A.; Tjiputra, J.; Muri, H.; Chadburn, S.; Lawrence, D.; Schwinger, J. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF001146.

"Climate engineering arises as one of the potential methods that could contribute to meeting the 1.5oC global warming target agreed under the Paris Agreement. We examine how permafrost and high latitude vegetation respond to large scale implementation of climate engineering. Specifically, we explore the impacts of applying the solar radiation management method of stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI) on permafrost temperature and the global extent of near‐surface permafrost area."

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11.02.2019

# Media

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Chatham House: Cool idea or hi-tech madness?

"As the threat from climate change looms ever larger, growing attention is being paid to proposals that sound as if they come straight from a sci-fi novel. One idea is to spray the stratosphere with particulates to reflect sunlight, thus reducing the temperature of planet Earth."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Wang, W.; Kravitz, B.; Tilmes, S.; Richter, J.; Mills, M. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering. In: J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 41 (3), S. 1738. DOI: 10.1029/2018JD028906.

"Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering could be used to maintain global mean temperature despite increased atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, for example, to meet a 1.5 or 2 °C target. While this might reduce many climate change impacts, the resulting climate would not be the same as one with the same global mean temperature due to lower GHG concentrations. The primary question we consider is how long it would take to detect these differences in a hypothetical deployment. We use a 20‐member ensemble of stratospheric sulfate aerosol geoengineering simulations in which SO2 is injected at four different latitudes to maintain not just the global mean temperature, but also the interhemispheric and equator‐to‐pole gradients."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Svoboda, T.; et al. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice

Svoboda, T.; Irvine, P.; Callies, D.; Sugiyama, M. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice. In: Journal of Global Ethics 15 (16), S. 1–16. DOI: 10.1080/17449626.2018.1552180.

"Climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections (SSAI) has the potential to reduce risks of injustice related to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Relying on evidence from modeling studies, this paper makes the case that SSAI could have the potential to reduce many of the key physical risks of climate change identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Such risks carry potential injustice because they are often imposed on low-emitters who do not benefit from climate change."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Sato, Y.; et al. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness?

Sato, Y.; Suzuki, K. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness? In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 363 (6427), S. 580–581. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw3720.

"Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere that originate from sources such as agricultural waste, forest fires, sea spray (see the photo), desert dust, and industrial pollution. They alter the energy balance of Earth's climate system through direct reflection and absorption of solar radiation as well as through modulating cloud properties by serving as nuclei for cloud particles."

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