01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Zhan, P.; et a. (2019): Impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China

Zhan, P.; Zhu, W.; Zhang, T.; Cui, X.; Li, N. (2019): Impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China. Results from a multi‐model ensemble. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF001094.

"In this study, we simulated the impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China both with sufficient irrigation (irrigated) and without irrigation (rainfed). We used Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4 climates from 6 climate models to force the ORYZA version 3 crop model to simulate rice yields under sulfate geoengineering scenario."

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17.03.2019

# Media

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IQS Directory: Everything You Need To Know About Geoengineering

"Now though, a majority are starting to accept that something in our environment is happening. Supporting this sentiment is the fact that a large number of scientists the world over agree that our world is rapidly changing – and not for the better. As more individuals subscribe to the scientific data points of a climate in peril, the debate is now turning to what we should do about it. In certain instances, those disagreements are far more intense than those concerning if there is a problem at all. One such climate remedy that continues to gain traction is equal parts radical and fantastical, brilliant and bonkers. That remedy is geoengineering."

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04.03.2019

# Media

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Nbcnews: Wallace Smith Broecker, the 'grandfather' of climate science, leaves a final warning for Earth

"It was time for humankind and the world’s scientific community to begin to seriously study more extreme solutions to the climate crisis, Broecker said. That included creating a massive solar shield in the Earth’s atmosphere, a tactic known variously as 'geoengineering,' 'the sulfur solution,' 'solar radiation management' and the 'Pinatubo Strategy.'"

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16.02.2019

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: We’re about to kill a massive, accidental experiment in halting global warming

"Studies have found that ships have a net cooling effect on the planet, despite belching out nearly a billion tons of carbon dioxide each year. That’s almost entirely because they also emit sulfur, which can scatter sunlight in the atmosphere and form or thicken clouds that reflect it away.  In effect, the shipping industry has been carrying out an unintentional experiment in climate engineering for more than a century."

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29.11.2018

# Media

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heise online: Geoengineering: Scientists want to test a way to cool the earth (German)

German article on CE.

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12.11.2018

# New Publications

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Madronich, S.; et al. (2018): Response of Surface Ultraviolet and Visible Radiation to Stratospheric SO2 Injections

Madronich, S.; Tilmes, S.; Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D.; Richter, J. (2018): Response of Surface Ultraviolet and Visible Radiation to Stratospheric SO2 Injections. In: Atmosphere 9 (11), S. 432. DOI: 10.3390/atmos9110432.

"Climate modification by stratospheric SO2 injections, to form sulfate aerosols, may alter the spectral and angular distributions of the solar ultraviolet and visible radiation that reach the Earth’s surface, with potential consequences to environmental photobiology and photochemistry. We used modeling results from the CESM1(WACCM) stratospheric aerosol geoengineering large ensemble (GLENS) project, following the RCP8.5 emission scenario, and one geoengineering experiment with SO2 injections in the stratosphere, designed to keep surface temperatures at 2020 levels."

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04.11.2018

# New Publications

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Duan, L.; et al. (2018): Comparison of the Fast and Slow Climate Response to Three Radiation Management Geoengineering Schemes

Duan, L.; Cao, L.; Bala, G.; Caldeira, K. (2018): Comparison of the Fast and Slow Climate Response to Three Radiation Management Geoengineering Schemes. In: J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. DOI: 10.1029/2018JD029034.

"Geoengineering has been proposed as a backup approach to rapidly cool the Earth and avoid damages associated with anthropogenic climate change. In this study, we use the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) to conduct a series of slab‐ocean and prescribed sea‐surface‐temperature simulations to investigate the climate response to three proposed radiation management geoengineering schemes: stratospheric aerosol increase (SAI), marine cloud brightening (MCB), and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT)."

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03.11.2018

# New Publications

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Fasullo, J.; et al. (2018): Persistent polar ocean warming in a strategically geoengineered climate

Fasullo, J.; Tilmes, S.; Richter, J.; Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D.; Mills, M.; Simpson, I. (2018): Persistent polar ocean warming in a strategically geoengineered climate. In: Nature Geosci. DOI: 10.1038/s41561-018-0249-7.

"Enhancement of the Earth’s albedo through the injection of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere has been proposed as an approach to offset some of the adverse effects of climate change. Here we analyse an ensemble of simulations of the twenty-first century climate designed to explore a strategic geoengineering approach. Specifically, stratospheric sulfur injections are imposed at 15° and 30° in both hemispheres with the aim to minimize the changes in surface temperature, both in the global mean and in its gradients between hemispheres and from equator to pole."

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25.10.2018

# New Publications

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Gunnarsson, I.; et al. (2018): The rapid and cost-effective capture and subsurface mineral storage of carbon and sulfur at the CarbFix2 site

Gunnarsson, I.; Aradóttir, E.; Oelkers, E.; Clark, D.; Arnarson, M.; Sigfússon, B. et al. (2018): The rapid and cost-effective capture and subsurface mineral storage of carbon and sulfur at the CarbFix2 site. In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 79, S. 117–126. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.08.014.

"Here we present a novel integrated carbon capture and storage technology, installed at the CarbFix2 storage site at Hellisheiði, Iceland that lowers considerably the cost and energy required at this site. The CarbFix2 site, located in deeper and hotter rocks than the original CarbFix site, permits the continuous injection of larger quantities of CO2 and H2S than the original site. The integrated process consists of soluble gas mixture capture in water followed by the direct injection of the resulting CO2-H2S-charged water into basaltic rock, where much of the dissolved carbon and sulfur are mineralized within months."

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