14.01.2019

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ntv: Scientists are testing the shadowing of the sun (German)

German article on CE

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14.01.2019

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Phys.org: Future of planet-cooling tech: Study creates roadmap for geoengineering research

"Simply reducing greenhouse gas emissions probably is not going to be sufficient for the planet to escape catastrophic damage from climate change, scientists say. Additional actions will be required, and one option is solar geoengineering, which could lower temperatures by methods such as reflecting sunlight away from the Earth through the deployment of aerosols in the stratosphere. However, the prospect of experimenting with the Earth's atmosphere has left some people skeptical of the process."

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14.01.2019

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Climatesnack: Promises and caveats of solar geoengineering on the land

"Scientists have proposed solar radiation management and greenhouse gas removal as alternative measures, also known as geoengineering, to limit global warming and alleviate its impacts. If we continue to live in a high CO2 world, solar geoengineering or solar radiation management could be an optional strategy for offsetting the warming effects of greenhouse gases."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Kravitz, B. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1811022116.

"The last decade has seen broad exploratory research into stratospheric aerosol (SA) geoengineering, motivated by concern that reducing greenhouse gas emissions may be insufficient to avoid significant impacts from climate change. [...] We highlight two important observations that follow from considering such a comprehensive, prioritized natural-science research effort. First, while field experiments may eventually be needed to reduce some of the uncertainties, we expect that the next phase of research will continue to be primarily model-based, with one outcome being to assess and prioritize which uncertainties need to be reduced (and, as a corollary, which field experiments can reduce those uncertainties). Second, we anticipate a clear separation in scale and character between small-scale experimental research to resolve specific process uncertainties and global-scale activities."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Pfrommer, T.; et al. (2019): Establishing causation in climate litigation

Pfrommer, T.; Goeschl, T.; Proelss, A.; Carrier, M.; Lenhard, J.; Martin, H. et al. (2019): Establishing causation in climate litigation. Admissibility and reliability. In: Climatic Change 421 (6926), S. 891. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-018-2362-4.

"Climate litigation has attracted renewed interest as a governance tool. A key challenge in climate litigation is to assess the factual basis of causation. Extreme weather attribution, specifically the Fraction of Attributable Risk (FAR), has been proposed as a way to tackle this challenge. What remains unclear is how attribution science interacts with the legal admissibility of evidence based on climate models. "

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06.01.2019

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Science News: What’s coming up in 2019

"A geoengineering technique to curb global warming by temporarily dimming the sun's rays could get its first, modest field experiment this year. In solar geoengineering, vast amounts of reflective aerosol particles would be sprayed into the high atmosphere, mimicking the cooling effects of volcanic eruptions."

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06.01.2019

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E&E News: Here's the research to watch in 2019

"Amid concern about the Paris Agreement's rapidly approaching global climate targets, geoengineering is a growing area of focus. One widely discussed, but highly controversial, hypothetical proposal involves spraying reflective aerosols into the atmosphere to beam sunlight away and cool the planet. It's called solar radiation management, or solar geoengineering."

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29.11.2018

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LegalPlanet: Don’t Believe Everything That You Read

"If you had followed the climate change news over the weekend, you might have been shocked to see headlines such as 'Scientists Prescribe a Healthy Dose of Sulphate Particles to Promote Global Cooling on the Cheap.' CNN tweeted that 'Harvard and Yale scientists are proposing that we tackle climate change by dimming the sun.' And the British tabloid The Express shouted 'GLOBAL WARMING SOLVED: Plans to DIM Sun by releasing CHEMICALS into atmosphere.' Such exaggerations — both positive and negative — are unfortunately common in media coverage of solar geoengineering."

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12.11.2018

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LegalPlanet: Solar Geoengineering and International Law

"A couple weeks ago, I introduced solar geoengineering (see also 1, 2, 4 in the series). This is a set of proposed technologies that would reduce climate change by blocking or reflecting a small portion of incoming sunlight. It appears that it would be effective in reducing climate change, inexpensive, rapid, and technically feasible. It would also pose environmental risks and social challenges. Here, I offer a brief overview of the relevant legal landscape."

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29.10.2018

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Harvard Kennedy School: Harvard Project Conducts Research Workshop on Governance of Solar Geoengineering

"The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements conducted a research workshop, “Governance of the Deployment of Solar Geoengineering,” September 27 – 28, 2018 at Harvard Kennedy School.  Harvard’s Solar Geoengineering Research Program (HSGRP) collaborated and provided support for the workshop. Participants included 26 leading academic researchers addressing the workshop’s topic as well as scholars who had considered the governance of other international regimes that might provide lessons and insights for solar geoengineering governance."

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