20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Smith, Patrick Taylor (2019): Legitimacy and Non-Domination in Solar Radiation Management Research

Smith, Patrick Taylor (2019): Legitimacy and Non-Domination in Solar Radiation Management Research. In Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (3), pp. 341–361. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562528.

"he purpose of this paper is to explore what I take to be a significant limitation of the proposed regimes: their failure to grapple with the significant power imbalances between the scientific and policy-making communities of the developed world doing the research and those of the developing world that will suffer the worst consequences of both climate change and climate engineering. This paper will argue that the value of non-domination, including and especially how it relates to global inequality, should guide our thinking about how to legitimately engage in research into solar radiation management."

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Jinnah, Sikina; Nicholson, Simon (2019): Introduction to the Symposium on ‘Geoengineering. Governing Solar Radiation Management'

Jinnah, Sikina; Nicholson, Simon (2019): Introduction to the Symposium on ‘Geoengineering. Governing Solar Radiation Management'. In Environmental Politics 28 (3), pp. 385–396. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2019.1558515.

"The term solar radiation management (SRM) describes a set of speculative technologies that might help humanity respond to climate change. SRM technologies would operate, if ever developed and deployed at scale, by reflecting a small amount of solar energy back into space before that energy warms the planet."

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20.05.2019

# Media

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Climate Strategies Blog: Solar Geoengineering, Governance, and Parametric Insurance

"In a new article published in the journal Climate Policy , David Keith and I propose a novel approach to addressing these issues.  We begin by recognizing that one or more countries attempting to implement solar geoengineering against the objections of key states would probably not succeed.  Opposing states would have a large suite of tools—trade and financial sanctions, diplomatic isolation, cyber attacks, etc.—they could employ to raise the costs of unilateral deployment far above the direct, near-term benefits any country could expect to gain."

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Horton, Joshua B.; Keith, David W. (2019): Multilateral parametric climate risk insurance. A tool to facilitate agreement about deployment of solar geoengineering?

Horton, Joshua B.; Keith, David W. (2019): Multilateral parametric climate risk insurance. A tool to facilitate agreement about deployment of solar geoengineering? In Climate Policy 4, pp. 1–7. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2019.1607716.

"We propose that multilateral parametric climate risk insurance might be a useful tool to facilitate agreement on solar geoengineering deployment. With parametric insurance, predetermined payouts are triggered when climate indices deviate from set ranges. We suggest that states favouring deployment could underwrite reduced-rate parametric climate insurance."

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13.05.2019

# New Publications

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Grieger, Khara D.; et al. (2019): Emerging risk governance for stratospheric aerosol injection as a climate management technology

Grieger, Khara D.; Felgenhauer, Tyler; Renn, Ortwin; Wiener, Jonathan; Borsuk, Mark (2019): Emerging risk governance for stratospheric aerosol injection as a climate management technology. In Environ Syst Decis 103 (46), pp. 1–12. DOI: 10.1007/s10669-019-09730-6.

"Robust governance strategies are needed to manage the many potential benefits, risks, and uncertainties related to SAI. This perspective reviews the International Risk Governance Council (IRGC)’s guidelines for emerging risk governance (ERG) as an approach for responsible consideration of SAI, given the IRGC’s experience in governing other more conventional risks. We examine how the five steps of the IRGC’s ERG guidelines would address the complex, uncertain, and ambiguous risks presented by SAI."

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06.05.2019

# Media

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C2G2: Should solar geoengineering research proceed?

"While solar geoengineering could limit some harmful climate impacts, these approaches could also have adverse impacts and would not address the root cause of climate change: rising emissions of heat-trapping gases from burning fossil fuels – or some of the resulting impacts, such as ocean acidification. We also know very little about how it could impact regional weather patterns, global politics, and efforts to curb global warming emissions."

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06.05.2019

# Media

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Fast Company: Is solar geoengineering crazy, or just crazy enough to work?

"A debate on whether the scientific community should ignore the possibility of artificially altering the temperature of Earth managed to change a lot of the audience’s minds."

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05.05.2019

# Media

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Pacific Standard: The Billionaires' Guide to Hacking the Planet

"SRM refers to "solar radiation management," the most frequently discussed form of geoengineering, which involves injecting aerosols in the stratosphere to cool the planet—much like major volcanic eruptions do naturally. The other key term here is "unilateral action." This refers to the possibility that someone might simply take matters into his own hands."

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05.05.2019

# New Publications

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Lee, H.; et al. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination

Lee, H.; Ekici, A.; Tjiputra, J.; Muri, H.; Chadburn, S.; Lawrence, D.; Schwinger, J. (2019): The response of permafrost and high latitude ecosystems under large scale stratospheric aerosol injection and its termination. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF001146.

"Climate engineering arises as one of the potential methods that could contribute to meeting the 1.5oC global warming target agreed under the Paris Agreement. We examine how permafrost and high latitude vegetation respond to large scale implementation of climate engineering. Specifically, we explore the impacts of applying the solar radiation management method of stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI) on permafrost temperature and the global extent of near‐surface permafrost area."

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04.05.2019

# Media

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CarbonBrief: The Carbon Brief Interview: Prof Joanna Haigh

"Prof Joanna Haigh is a professor of atmospheric physics and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London. Her research into solar influences on climate has seen her awarded the Chree Medal and Prize of the Institute of Physics in 2004 and the Adrian Gill Prize of the Royal Meteorological Society in 2010. She was president of the Royal Meteorological Society from 2012 to 2014. In 2013, she was awarded a CBE for services to physics. Haigh will retire in May this year."

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