10.10.2021

# New Publications

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van Schagen, T. N.; et al. (2021): Development of a novel, through-flow microwave-based regenerator for sorbent-based direct air capture

van Schagen, T. N.; van der Wal, P. J.; Brilman, D.W.F. (2021): Development of a novel, through-flow microwave-based regenerator for sorbent-based direct air capture. In Chemical Engineering Journal Advances 42 (8), p. 100187. DOI: 10.1016/j.ceja.2021.100187.

"In this work an all-electric regenerator is developed for the desorption of CO2 from air-capture sorbents using microwaves. An electromagnetic model was made for a continuous flow radial desorber and its dimensions were optimised for maximal microwave utilisation. Based on the optimal dimensions an actual prototype, capable of desorbing CO2 from a commercial supported amine sorbent in fixed- or moving-bed configuration was built to demonstrate the concept and to study performance characteristics. TSA experiments using nitrogen as purge gas to produce enriched air (1 to 2 vol. % CO2) were done. Productivities of up to 1.5 kg CO2/kgsorb./d were demonstrated, with a total energy duty of 25 MJ/kgCO2. Compared to traditional TVSA desorption, the energy duty is similar while the productivity is significantly higher. The process can be further improved by creating an even more homogeneous electric field (preventing hot spots in the regenerator) and by enabling desorption under vacuum conditions to produce pure CO2. Overall, microwave desorption is demonstrated as an effective way to circumvent heat transfer limitations present during more traditional thermal desorption processes using polymeric sorbents."

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08.10.2021

# New Publications

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Joppa, Lucas; et al. (2021): Microsoft's million-tonne CO2-removal purchase - lessons for net zero

Joppa, Lucas; Luers, Amy; Willmott, Elizabeth; Friedmann, S. Julio; Hamburg, Steven P.; Broze, Rafael (2021): Microsoft's million-tonne CO2-removal purchase - lessons for net zero. In Nature 597 (7878), pp. 629–632. DOI: 10.1038/d41586-021-02606-3.

"Strengthen markets, measures and definitions for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to fight climate change. In January this year, Microsoft made a major announcement: it had paid for the removal of 1.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Among its purchases were projects to expand forests in Peru, Nicaragua and the United States, as well as initiatives to regenerate soil across US farms. [...] Here we summarize the lessons learnt from Microsoft’s carbon-removal efforts, along with those from another early corporate procurement — the $9-million purchases of carbon removal in 2020 and 2021 by the US–Irish financial-infrastructure company Stripe. Although these are just two companies’ efforts, they are the first significant open solicitations focused exclusively on carbon removal. We write as a team composed of Microsoft staff working on the company’s carbon-negative programme and research scientists who analyse carbon reduction and removal strategies."

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07.10.2021

# Media

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Video: This Is CDR Ep09: Climeworks Update - 2021 and Beyond with Christoph Beuttler (Open Air)

"In this session of This Is CDR we welcome Christoph Beuttler, Head of Climate Policy for Climeworks. Christoph provides an overview of the company’s industry-leading modular DAC solution, and shares perspective on the current state and future of the market for DAC and CDR."

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07.10.2021

# New Publications

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Grossmann, Quirin; et al. (2021): Molecular to Process Scale: A Review of Holistic Direct Air Capture Contactor Design

Grossmann, Quirin; Stampi-Bombelli, Valentina; Mazzotti, Marco (2021): Molecular to Process Scale: A Review of Holistic Direct Air Capture Contactor Design. In SINTEF Proceedings (7). Available online at https://sintef.brage.unit.no/sintef-xmlui/bitstream/handle/11250/2786929/Molecular%20to%20Process%20Scale%20A%20Review%20of%20Holistic%20Direct%20Air%20Capture%20Contactor%20Design.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

"Air-sorbent contactors are an essential part of direct air capture processes. Their design can have a great influence on the process energy demand and efficiency. Three aspects of this design have been identified and differentiated by length scale. On a molecular scale, the adsorption sites are defined by the chemisorbent-containing molecules, generally amines. The support of these amines defines the second length scale and plays an important role in mass and heat transfer. These two length scales have been studied in detail in academic literature and a short overview is given. The third length scale is the process scale, or contactor module scale. Together with the first two length scales, it is necessary to characterize the third to perform adequate process optimization. Research on this third length scale is scarce in academic literature, though it has been researched in industry. The direction of research tends towards structured sorbents due to their ability to process large volumes of air and academic research in this area should be expanded."

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04.10.2021

# Media

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News 21 channel: OSU to lead Dept. of Energy project to capture carbon dioxide from the air

"CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University chemistry professor May Nyman has been selected as one of the leaders of a $24 million federal effort to develop technologies for combating climate change by extracting carbon from the air."

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04.10.2021

# Media

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Ends Report: BECCS, DACCS and blue carbon: Everything you need to know about negative emissions technologies

"MPs have announced an inquiry into how greenhouse gases can be absorbed and stored. Here’s what you need to know about capturing emissions from biomass combustion, filtering CO2 from the air and other rival ideas."

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30.09.2021

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: 2nd International Conference on Negative CO2 Emissions

Deadline: 1. December 2021

"The objective of the Paris Agreement is to limit global warming to well below 2ºC, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5ºC. The carbon budget is the amount of carbon dioxide that we can emit while still limiting global temperature rise to a given level, for example 1.5ºC.The exact size of the carbon budget is uncertain and depends on many factors, including potential future warming of non-CO2 climate forcers. This said, the remaining budgets for limiting the warming to 1.5ºC or 2ºC have been estimated at about 420 and 1170 Gt of CO2 . With unchanged present emissions at about 40 Gt CO2/year these budgets would be exhausted in as few as 10 and 30 years, respectively. Most of the IPCC emission scenarios that meet a global two-degree target in 2100 overshoot the carbon budget at first and then remove the excess carbon with large negative emissions, typically on the order of 400‑800 Gt CO2 up to 2100.At the same time as negative emissions appear to be indispensable to meet adopted climate targets, the large future negative emissions assumed in climate models have been questioned and warnings have been raised about relying on very large and uncertain negative emissions in the future. With the future climate at stake, a deeper and fuller understanding of the various aspects of negative emissions is needed."

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27.09.2021

# Media

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The Guardian: Climate crisis: do we need millions of machines sucking CO2 from the air?

"Does the world need millions of machines sucking carbon dioxide directly out of the air to beat the climate crisis? There is a fast-growing number of companies that believe the answer is yes and that are deploying their first devices into the real world."

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27.09.2021

# Media

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Frankfurter Allgemeine: How to remove CO2 out of the air (German)

German newspaper article on Direct Air Capture. 

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27.09.2021

# Media

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Podcast: Energy Exchange: A Major Milestone For Direct-Air-CO2 Capture

"The world’s biggest carbon capture and storage machine launched last week in Iceland. It’s called Orca. According to Swiss startup Climeworks, the company which built the plant, it will capture 4,000 metric tons of CO2 per year and bury it underground."

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