10.10.2021

# New Publications

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Haque, Fatima; et al. (2021): Urban Farming with Enhanced Rock Weathering As a Prospective Climate Stabilization Wedge

Haque, Fatima; Santos, Rafael M.; Chiang, Yi Wai (2021): Urban Farming with Enhanced Rock Weathering As a Prospective Climate Stabilization Wedge. In Environmental science & technology. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.1c04111.

"With no single carbon capture and sequestration solution able to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5–2.0 °C by 2100, additional climate stabilization measures are needed to complement current mitigation approaches. Urban farming presents an easy-to-adopt pathway toward carbon neutrality, unlocking extensive urban surface areas that can be leveraged to grow food while sequestering CO2. Urban farming involves extensive surface areas, such as roofs, balconies, and vertical spaces, allowing for soil presence and atmospheric carbon sequestration through air-to-soil contact. In this viewpoint we also advocate the incorporation of enhanced rock weathering (ERW) into urban farming, providing a further opportunity for this recognized negative emissions technology that is gaining momentum worldwide to gain greater utilization."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Reuters: Made-from-CO2 concrete, lululemons and diamonds spark investor excitement

"What do diamonds, sunglasses, high-end lululemon sportswear and concrete have to do with climate change? They can all be made using carbon dioxide (CO2), locking up the planet warming gas. And tech startups behind these transformations are grabbing investor attention."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Labiotech: Novo Nordisk Foundation Pumps €85M into Carbon Capture Research

"As pressure mounts to tackle climate change, the Danish Novo Nordisk Foundation has granted €84.7M to the world’s first research institution dedicated to capturing carbon dioxide from the air and harnessing the gas as a raw material."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Gasworld: Shell to use BASF Sorbead tech for CCS

"Major player in the energy industry Shell is to incorporate catalyst expert BASF’s Sorbead Adsorption Technology into its carbon reduction plan following a collaborative partnership. The collaboration involved working together to study the use of the Sorbead technology for pre- and post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Upstream: Australian government looks to 'turbocharge' development of carbon capture and storage hubs

"Canberra to provide a A$250 million injection towards developing CCUS hubs that could be operational before the end of the decade."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Mirage: Emissions Reduction Fund to credit carbon capture and storage projects

"The Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF) will now credit eligible projects that capture and permanently store carbon underground.The Australian Government introduced the new carbon capture and storage (CCS) method following public consultation."

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07.10.2021

# New Publications

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Du, Yang; et al. (2021): Zero- and negative-emissions fossil-fired power plants using CO2 capture by conventional aqueous amines

Du, Yang; Gao, Tianyu; Rochelle, Gary T.; Bhown, Abhoyjit S. (2021): Zero- and negative-emissions fossil-fired power plants using CO2 capture by conventional aqueous amines. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 111, p. 103473. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2021.103473.

"This work investigated the technical and economic feasibility of achieving zero and negative CO2 emissions in both pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, using conventional amine scrubbing with 30 wt% aqueous monoethanolamine. In this work, we refer to “zero emissions” when the amount of CO2 in the exhaust flue gas is equal to that in the intake combustion air, and “negative emissions” when the amount of CO2 in the exhaust flue gas is less that in the intake combustion air. Increasing CO2 capture from 90% to that at zero-emissions for fossil-fired power plants can reduce global CO2 emissions by up to ∼1 Gt/y for the current global power generation mix. Even higher CO2 capture leads to negative emissions of the power plant with part of the CO2 from the intake air removed along with the fossil-fuel derived CO2. With an absorber configuration including a simple solvent intercooler, both PC and NGCC power plants can achieve zero-emissions with a ∼5% and ∼13% increase in CO2 avoidance costs, compared with the costs at 90% CO2 capture. The larger cost penalty for NGCC was mainly due to a temperature bulge at the absorber top. Replacing the simple solvent intercooler with a pump-around intercooler was able to reduce this cost penalty to ∼8%. Further decarbonization of flue gases from zero-emissions to direct air capture (DAC)-level of negative emissions (∼100 ppmv of CO2 in exhaust gases) has incremental costs of over $1000/t CO2 avoided for both PC and NGCC."

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06.10.2021

# New Publications

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D'Aniello, Andrea; et al. (2021): Modeling Gaseous CO2 Flow Behavior in Layered Basalts: Dimensional Analysis and Aquifer Response

D'Aniello, Andrea; Tómasdóttir, Sigrún; Sigfússon, Bergur; Fabbricino, Massimiliano (2021): Modeling Gaseous CO2 Flow Behavior in Layered Basalts: Dimensional Analysis and Aquifer Response. In Ground water 59 (5), pp. 677–693. DOI: 10.1111/gwat.13090.

"Particular attention is paid to the risk of carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) operations, as it might lead to the failure of sequestration efforts and to the contamination of underground sources of drinking water. As carbon dioxide would eventually reach shallower formations under its gaseous state, understanding its multiphase flow behavior is essential. To this aim, a hypothetical gaseous leak of carbon dioxide resulting from a well integrity failure of the GCS system in operation at Hellisheiði (CarbFix2) is here modeled."

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06.10.2021

# New Publications

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Marieni, Chiara; et al. (2021): Mineralization potential of water-dissolved CO2 and H2S injected into basalts as function of temperature: Freshwater versus Seawater

Marieni, Chiara; Voigt, Martin; Clark, Deirdre E.; Gíslason, Sigurður R.; Oelkers, Eric H. (2021): Mineralization potential of water-dissolved CO2 and H2S injected into basalts as function of temperature: Freshwater versus Seawater. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 109, p. 103357. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2021.103357.

"Mineralization of freshwater-dissolved gases, such as CO2 and H2S, in subsurface mafic rocks is a successful permanent gas storage strategy. To apply this approach globally, the composition of locally available water must be considered. In this study, reaction path models were run to estimate the rate and extent of gas mineralization reactions during gas-charged freshwater and seawater injection into basalts at temperatures of 260, 170, 100, and 25°C."

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06.10.2021

# New Publications

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Mahzari, Pedram; et al. (2021): Characterizing fluid flow paths in the Hellisheidi geothermal field using detailed fault mapping and stress-dependent permeability

Mahzari, Pedram; Stanton-Yonge, Ashley; Sanchez-Roa, Catalina; Saldi, Giuseppe; Mitchell, Thomas; Oelkers, Eric H. et al. (2021): Characterizing fluid flow paths in the Hellisheidi geothermal field using detailed fault mapping and stress-dependent permeability. In Geothermics 94 (8), p. 102127. DOI: 10.1016/j.geothermics.2021.102127.

"The Husmuli zone of the SW-Iceland Hellisheidi geothermal field is currently being used for re-injection of geothermal fluids and geothermal CO2 for its permanent storage in the form of carbonate minerals. A fully coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical numerical model was employed to investigate the coupled impacts of these complex processes on the calibration of fluid flow paths, which can have significant implications for the long-term performance of this subsurface reservoir."

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