20.02.2019

# Media

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Solarify: "Geoengineering dangerous fallcy" (German)

German article on CE

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19.02.2019

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Financial Times: Researchers plan to enlist ocean viruses in climate change fight

"The trillions of marine viruses that inhabit the world’s oceans could be mobilised in the fight against climate change. New studies suggest that manipulating the viruses that infect most of the bacteria in the oceans enables the microbes to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which could be employed to tackle global warming."

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18.02.2019

# New Publications

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Emerson, D. (2019): Biogenic Iron Dust: A Novel Approach to Ocean Iron Fertilization as a Means of Large Scale Removal of Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere

Emerson, D. (2019): Biogenic Iron Dust: A Novel Approach to Ocean Iron Fertilization as a Means of Large Scale Removal of Carbon Dioxide From the Atmosphere. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 6, S. 3944. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00022.

"This is a proposal for ocean iron fertilization as a means to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The idea is to take advantage of nanoparticulate, poorly crystalline Fe-oxides produced by chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing bacteria as an iron source to the ocean. Upon drying these oxides produce a fine powder that could be dispersed at altitude by aircraft to augment wind-driven Aeolian dust that is a primary iron source to the open ocean."

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18.02.2019

# New Publications

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Prajapati, A.; et al. (2019): Assessment of Artificial Photosynthetic Systems for Integrated Carbon Capture and Conversion

Prajapati, A.; Singh, M. (2019): Assessment of Artificial Photosynthetic Systems for Integrated Carbon Capture and Conversion. In: ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b04969.

"Sustainable and continuous operation of an artificial photosynthetic (AP) system requires a constant supply of CO2 captured from the dilute sources such as the flue gas and the air to make fuels and chemicals. Although the architecture of AP systems resembles that of the natural leaves, they lack an important component like stomata to capture CO2 directly from the dilute sources. Here we design and evaluate the solar-to-fuel (STF) efficiency of the integrated AP system that captures CO2 directly from the air/flue gas and converts it to fuels using sunlight."

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18.02.2019

# Media

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Foreign Affairs: Less Than Zero

"Most Americans used to think about climate change—to the extent that they thought about it at all—as an abstract threat in a distant future. But more and more are now seeing it for what it is: a costly, human-made disaster unfolding before their very eyes."

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18.02.2019

# New Publications

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Li, M.; et al. (2019): Carbon dioxide sequestration accompanied by bioenergy generation using a bubbling-type photosynthetic algae microbial fuel cell

Li, M.; Zhou, M.; Luo, J.; Tan, C.; Tian, X.; Su, P.; Gu, T. (2019): Carbon dioxide sequestration accompanied by bioenergy generation using a bubbling-type photosynthetic algae microbial fuel cell. In: Bioresource Technology 280, S. 95–103. DOI: 10.1016/j.biortech.2019.02.038.

"This study developed a bubbling-type photosynthetic algae microbial fuel cell (B-PAMFC) to treat synthetic wastewater and capture CO2 using Chlorella vulgaris with simultaneous power production. The performance of B-PAMFC in CO2 fixation and bioenergy production was compared with the photosynthetic algae microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) and bubbling photobioreactor. Different nitrogen sources for C. vulgaris growth, namely sodium nitrate, urea, ammonium acetate and acetamide were studied."

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18.02.2019

# Media

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Legal Planet: Does the Fossil Fuel Industry Support Geoengineering?

"Geoengineering is controversial in the climate change community, and understandably so. Proposed interventions like negative emissions technologies (a.k.a. carbon dioxide removal) and solar geoengineering (a.k.a. solar radiation management or SRM) involve large-scale intervention in the climate system that could have adverse physical or social impacts. At the same time, some geoengineering methods could substantially reduce climate change."

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16.02.2019

# Political Papers

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C2G2: Geoengineering: the need for governance. February 2019

"Geoengineering refers to a broad set of methods and technologies that aim to deliberately alter the climate system on a sufficiently large scale to alleviate the impacts of climate change. While definitions and terminology vary, in line with recent scientific consensus this paper gives separate consideration to the two main approaches considered as geoengineering: Solar Radiation Modification (SRM) and large-scale Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR)."

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16.02.2019

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Khaleej Times: Tampering with the weather could end in disaster

"To avoid crossing the 1.5°C threshold, the world must nearly halve its CO2 emissions by 2030, and reach net zero emissions by 2050. This will be possible only if we completely eliminate fossil fuels from the economy within the next few decades. Attempts to circumvent that reality will only make matters worse. We're at risk of doing just that. A growing number of people are now considering the once-unthinkable strategy of geoengineering our way out of the climate crisis."

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11.02.2019

# Media

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Climate Institute: Negative Emission Technologies: Silver Bullet or Ethically Ambiguous?

"This paper explores the potential of negative emission technologies (NETs) and highlights the difficulties associated with them. It argues that although these technologies are indeed impressive in theory, the reality shows that they are nowhere near ready to remove carbon at the scale required. This therefore leads to a level of moral ambiguity that could be detrimental to effective climate action. While continued research and development is imperative to global progress – and indeed, technology will be required in the future – the way the utility of NETs is presented threatens to produce an ethical dilemma."

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