20.10.2021

# Media

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The Guardian: Drax dropped from index of green energy firms amid biomass doubts

"Drax has been booted from an investment index of clean energy companies as doubts over the sustainability of its wood-burning power plant begin to mount within the financial sector. "

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20.10.2021

# Political Papers

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University of York (2021): Geoengineering: A climate of uncertainty. Youth guide and policy brief on geoengineering

University of York (2021): Geoengineering: A climate of uncertainty. Youth guide and policy brief on geoengineering. Available online at https://www.york.ac.uk/media/educationalstudies/documents/research/uyseg/best/Geoengineering%20-%20a%20climate%20of%20uncertainty.pdf.

"The purpose of this guide is to introduce key ideas and questions about geoengineering in order to spark a conversation about intervention in the Earth's climate system in the context of the range of possible responses to the climate crisis. It has been written by young people, for young people."

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18.10.2021

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Video: Between a rock and a wet place: putting carbon back into geological storage (Oxford Net Zero Climate)

"The cycle of carbon between the Earth’s surface and its deep interior is a key component of our goldilocks planet. Without it we would not have life or water on the planet today. Natural carbon burial has provided us with the fossil fuels we have used to develop our technologically advanced society, but through greenhouse gas emissions, it is also rapidly starting to degrade the quality of life on the planet. To bring this cycle back into balance we need not only to cut emissions but also accelerate the natural return of CO2 back to the Earth. There is a plethora of methods for doing this. In the 7th discussion in the Oxford Net Zero Series, hosted by the Oxford Martin School, Professor Mike Kendall, Professor Joe Cartwright and Dr Tom Kettlety will discuss sub-sea storage of CO2."

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18.10.2021

# Media

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Reuters: Occidental sees profits in carbon capture, downplays oil production growth -CEO

"U.S. oil and gas producer Occidental (OXY.N) wants to raise margins and re-establish dividend payments with new businesses such as carbon capture rather than producing more oil and gas, Chief Executive Vicki A. Hollub said on Thursday."

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18.10.2021

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PhysOrg: New finding could inform how zeolites are used in carbon capture and storage

"Filled with microscopic holes and channels, these ultraporous minerals can soak up environmental contaminants, filter drinking water, manage nuclear waste and even absorb carbon dioxide (CO2).Now, in the first study of its kind, Northwestern University researchers have analyzed ancient zeolite specimens collected from the edges of East Iceland to discover that zeolites separate calcium isotopes in a wholly unexpected way."

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18.10.2021

# Media

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The Economic Times: Global carbon capture projects surge 50% in 9 months -research

"Global plans to build carbon capture and storage (CCS) plants have mushroomed over the last nine months as governments and companies accelerate the hunt for ways to cut emissions and curb global warming by mid-century, a think tank said on Tuesday."

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18.10.2021

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Energy.Gov: DOE Invests $45 Million to Decarbonize the Natural Gas Power and Industrial Sectors Using Carbon Capture and Storage

"The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $45 million in funding for 12 projects to advance point-source carbon capture and storage technologies that can capture at least 95% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generated from natural gas power and industrial facilities that produce commodities like cement and steel. These research and development, front-end engineering design and engineering-scale projects are a part of DOE’s efforts to deploy a portfolio of innovative solutions to help achieve the Biden-Harris Administration’s goals of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 and a 100% clean electricity sector by 2035."

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18.10.2021

# Media

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Cision PR Newswire: Carbon Capture and Storage Gathers Momentum in Response to Rising Climate Ambition

"A new climate report released by the Global CCS Institute has highlighted the continuing growth of carbon capture and storage (CCS) worldwide. In 2021, the total capacity of the CCS project-pipeline increased for the fourth year in a row, by almost one third over the previous year. CCS is recognised by experts as an essential element of achieving the world's climate change goals. "

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18.10.2021

# Media

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Blog: Why Orca matters: long-term climate policy and Climeworks’ new direct air capture facility in Iceland (Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy)

"Orca is a baby step toward a larger carbon removal industry that could one day clean up emissions from the hardest-to-abate sectors or, even better, start cleaning up “legacy carbon” that remains in the atmosphere from our past emissions. Without baby steps like Orca, though, we would never get there. In that respect, Orca is a bit like the tiny, 3.5 kilowatt solar power station that NASA’s Lewis Research Center installed on the Papago Indian Reservation in 1978; it’s only the beginning. Global solar power capacity now stands at more than 200 million times the capacity of that little installation. While direct air capture isn’t likely to grow at such a pace, the point is that we shouldn’t judge the potential of an industry by its output in its earliest days."

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18.10.2021

# Media

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Video: Can we remove carbon from the atmosphere? (True Planet)

"There is no ‘magic’ technology to solve climate change, says Professor Cameron Hepburn, Director and Professor of Environmental Economics at Oxford’s Smith School and director of the university’s Economics of Sustainability programme. ‘I wish there were,’ he says. ‘But we have to use all the existing tricks we have in the book as fast as possible to reduce emissions.’ Professor Hepburn emphasises there are some really interesting new technologies – and he thinks we should work to scale these up. In the meantime, he says, we already have some very old technology – the humble tree, which has been doing an important job for millennia – and is making a real contribution to reducing climate change. But Professor Hepburn says that right now, far from rewilding and restoring our ecosystems, we are deforesting and damaging nature with harmful agricultural practices. That needs to change. ‘Used together these various techniques...are going to make quite a big contribution to addressing climate change...what’s stopping us?’ Part of the problem, he says, is that somebody has to pay – and we need to talk about how to achieve that, without relying entirely on the taxpayer. But economics is only part of this, he says. We also need to think about a range of complex issues from politics to equity and beliefs – but, critically, the public needs to be on-board."

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