18.10.2021

# Media

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Biomass Magazine: Drax to showcase bioenergy with CCS to global investors

"Renewable energy giant Drax is one of just a dozen green companies selected to take part in the government’s Global Investment Summit next week. The event, hosted by the prime minister and the royal family, will showcase the opportunities for investment in the U.K., demonstrating the government’s commitment to building back better following the Covid-19 pandemic and delivering the Ten-Point-Plan set out last year. Drax will showcase its multi-billion-pound innovative negative emissions technology, bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), which permanently removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and will be needed for the U.K. to reach its climate targets cost effectively."

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18.10.2021

# New Publications

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Talei, Saeed; Soleimani, Zahra (2021): Comparative Analysis of Three Different Negative Emission Technologies, BECCS, Absorption and Adsorption of Atmospheric CO 2

Talei, Saeed; Soleimani, Zahra (2021): Comparative Analysis of Three Different Negative Emission Technologies, BECCS, Absorption and Adsorption of Atmospheric CO 2. In Civil and Environmental Engineering Reports 31 (3), pp. 99–117. DOI: 10.2478/ceer-2021-0036.

"Negative Emission Technologies (NETs) are generally considered as vital methods for achieving climate goals. To limit the rise in the global average temperature below 2 °C, a large number of countries that participated in the Paris agreement was virtually unanimous about the effective collaboration among members for the reduction of CO2 emissions throughout this century. NETs on the ground that can remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, provide an active option to achieve this goal. In this contribution, we compare limiting factors, cost, and capacity of three different NETs, including bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), absorption and adsorption. Although there are several advantages for capturing CO2, still some constraints regarding the high operational cost of NETs and industrial condition of these technologies as a method of climate change mitigation is not clear. Thereby no single process can be considered as a comprehensive solution. Indeed, any developed technologies, in turn, have a contribution to the reduction of CO2 concentration. Extensive research needs to be done to assess and decrease NETs costs and limitations."

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18.10.2021

# Media

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The Conversation: A global carbon removal industry is coming – experts explain the problems it must overcome

"There are several ways to remove carbon from the atmosphere. One is called bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, or Beccs. Here, vast acres of fast-growing plants are grown and then harvested and burned to generate electricity or make biofuel for vehicles. Beccs can even use waste from farms or timber plantations. The carbon normally released during the burning or fermentation stage is instead captured and pumped underground in old oil and gas wells or deep rock formations called saline aquifers. These storage sites can be beneath land (which is common in the US) or the seabed. There are over 20 years of experience in storing CO₂ under the Norwegian North Sea, for instance."

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08.10.2021

# Media

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Video: Biomass Harvesting and Storage (AirMiners Event Series)

"We at AirMiners continuously strive to find novel, potentially impactful methods of carbon removal; our panel event on Biomass Harvest and Storage (BHS) represents just that! Problem: Since biomass is essentially photosynthetically captured carbon, when plant biomass dies and decomposes, it releases its carbon back to the atmosphere as CO2 and other GHGs via the Carbon Cycle. Solution: BHS is a CDR method in which dead or live biomass is harvested via collection or selective cutting, and then either buried underground or stored aboveground to slow or prevent biomass from decomposing. BHS thus provides a way to break the Carbon Cycle and remove atmospheric CO2."

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04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Bennett, Jeffrey A.; et al. (2021): Life cycle meta-analysis of carbon capture pathways in power plants: Implications for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

Bennett, Jeffrey A.; Abotalib, Mohammad; Zhao, Fu; Clarens, Andres F. (2021): Life cycle meta-analysis of carbon capture pathways in power plants: Implications for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 111, p. 103468. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2021.103468.

"Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) based electricity generation is one possible approach for delivering large-scale carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere. This study evaluates the environmental impacts of leveraging existing power plants for BECCS. We performed a life cycle meta-analysis of eight carbon capture technologies, including five previously simulated only for coal and natural gas, for both steam cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. We found that IGCC plants offer the best balance of negative emissions, energy return on investment (EROI) and low water use irrespective of capture technologies. Planned IGCC plants tend to be large whereas biomass-fired power plants are often small and distributed in the landscape because of the distributed nature of the fuel. Steam cycle plants had larger negative emissions, but also lower EROI, and so blending with coal may be necessary to achieve a suitable EROI. Steam cycles were sensitive to capture technology type, and results found membrane and calcium looping capture technologies offer a balance between negative emissions, EROI and water use when fired using coal-biomass blends. These results suggest that steam cycle power plants may be the most desirable candidates to support early-stage deployment of BECCS."

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04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Waller, Laurie; et al. (2021): Searching for a Public in Controversies over Carbon Dioxide Removal: An Issue Mapping Study on BECCS and Afforestation

Waller, Laurie; Rayner, Tim; Chilvers, Jason (2021): Searching for a Public in Controversies over Carbon Dioxide Removal: An Issue Mapping Study on BECCS and Afforestation. In Science, Technology & Human Values, 016224392110435. DOI: 10.1177/01622439211043568.

"The roles digital media-technologies play in raising public issues relating to emerging technologies and their potential for engaging publics with science and policy assessments is a lively field of inquiry in Science and Technology Studies (STS). This paper presents an analysis of controversies over proposals for the large-scale removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CDR). The study combines a digital method (web-querying) with document analysis to map debates about two CDR approaches: bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and afforestation. In the first step, we locate actors using the web to engage with BECCS and afforestation and map their alignments in relation to competing framings of CDR. In a second step, we examine the devices deployed by UK-based actors to evidence and contest the feasibility of BECCS and afforestation. Our analysis shows that policy distinctions between “natural” and “engineered” CDR are used flexibly in practice and do not map neatly onto actor engagement with BECCS and afforestation. We highlight the predominance of cross-cutting techno-economic expertise and argue that framings of CDR as a solution to governing climate change may contribute to public disengagement from climate policy processes. The paper reflects on methods for studying controversies, publics, and issues emerging around processes of technoscientific assessment."

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04.10.2021

# Media

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Ends Report: BECCS, DACCS and blue carbon: Everything you need to know about negative emissions technologies

"MPs have announced an inquiry into how greenhouse gases can be absorbed and stored. Here’s what you need to know about capturing emissions from biomass combustion, filtering CO2 from the air and other rival ideas."

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30.09.2021

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: 2nd International Conference on Negative CO2 Emissions

Deadline: 1. December 2021

"The objective of the Paris Agreement is to limit global warming to well below 2ºC, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5ºC. The carbon budget is the amount of carbon dioxide that we can emit while still limiting global temperature rise to a given level, for example 1.5ºC.The exact size of the carbon budget is uncertain and depends on many factors, including potential future warming of non-CO2 climate forcers. This said, the remaining budgets for limiting the warming to 1.5ºC or 2ºC have been estimated at about 420 and 1170 Gt of CO2 . With unchanged present emissions at about 40 Gt CO2/year these budgets would be exhausted in as few as 10 and 30 years, respectively. Most of the IPCC emission scenarios that meet a global two-degree target in 2100 overshoot the carbon budget at first and then remove the excess carbon with large negative emissions, typically on the order of 400‑800 Gt CO2 up to 2100.At the same time as negative emissions appear to be indispensable to meet adopted climate targets, the large future negative emissions assumed in climate models have been questioned and warnings have been raised about relying on very large and uncertain negative emissions in the future. With the future climate at stake, a deeper and fuller understanding of the various aspects of negative emissions is needed."

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29.09.2021

# New Publications

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Clery, Diarmaid S.; et al. (2021): Bringing greenhouse gas removal down to earth: Stakeholder supply chain appraisals reveal complex challenges

Clery, Diarmaid S.; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Forster, Johanna; Lorenzoni, Irene; Gough, Clair A.; Chilvers, Jason (2021): Bringing greenhouse gas removal down to earth: Stakeholder supply chain appraisals reveal complex challenges. In Global Environmental Change 71 (6309), p. 102369. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2021.102369.

"Greenhouse gas removal (GGR) approaches are considered essential in several projections to meet the climate mitigation ambition of the Paris Agreement. Biomass Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) and afforestation are included extensively in mitigation scenarios but there are concerns about the feasibility of these approaches. This was explored with stakeholders from industry, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and policy who were involved in interviews and a one-day participatory workshop. Multicriteria mapping (MCM) methodology was used to appraise the ‘real-world’ feasibility of four specific greenhouse gas removal supply chains at a granular level in the UK context."

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27.09.2021

# New Publications

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Melnikova, Irina; et al. (2021): Impact of bioenergy crops expansion on climate-carbon cycle feedbacks in overshoot scenarios

Melnikova, Irina; Boucher, Olivier; Cadule, Patricia; Tanaka, Katsumasa; Gasser, Thomas; Hajima, Tomohiro et al. (2021): Impact of bioenergy crops expansion on climate-carbon cycle feedbacks in overshoot scenarios. In Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss. (preprint). DOI: 10.5194/esd-2021-72.

"Stringent mitigation pathways frame the deployment of second-generation bioenergy crops combined with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to generate negative CO2 emissions. This Bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) technology facilitates the achievement of the long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement. Here, we use five state-of-the-art Earth System models (ESMs) to explore the consequences of large-scale BECCS deployment on the carbon cycle and carbon-climate feedback under the CMIP6 SSP5-3.4-OS overshoot scenario, keeping in mind that all these models use generic crop vegetation to simulate BECCS crops. We show that an extensive cropland expansion for BECCS causes ecosystem carbon loss that drives the acceleration of carbon turnover and affects the estimates of the absolute values of the global carbon-concentration β and carbon-climate γ feedback parameters."

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