24.10.2019

# New Publications

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Buck, Holly Jean (2019): Challenges and Opportunities of Bioenergy With Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) for Communities

Buck, Holly Jean (2019): Challenges and Opportunities of Bioenergy With Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) for Communities. In Current Sustainable/Renewable Energy Reports. DOI: 10.1007/s40518-019-00139-y.

"BECCS cannot be viewed on just the community scale without considering how national and global scales influence system design. The limited research relevant to BECCS on the community scale looks at public acceptance or social license, rather than opportunities for communities. Future research can move beyond “social impact” to study “social demand” for BECCS, and identify opportunities for communities along the farm-to-underground or farm-to-product chain."

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23.10.2019

# New Publications

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Smith, Pete; et al. (2019): Land-Management Options for Greenhouse Gas Removal and Their Impacts on Ecosystem Services and the Sustainable Development Goals

Smith, Pete; Adams, Justin; Beerling, David J.; Beringer, Tim; Calvin, Katherine V.; Fuss, Sabine et al. (2019): Land-Management Options for Greenhouse Gas Removal and Their Impacts on Ecosystem Services and the Sustainable Development Goals. In Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 44 (1), pp. 255–286. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-environ-101718-033129.

"Land-management options for greenhouse gas removal (GGR) include afforestation or reforestation (AR), wetland restoration, soil carbon sequestration (SCS), biochar, terrestrial enhanced weathering (TEW), and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). We assess the opportunities and risks associated with these options through the lens of their potential impacts on ecosystem services (Nature's Contributions to People; NCPs) and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)."

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17.10.2019

# New Publications

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Low, S.; et al. (2020): Is bio-energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS) feasible? The contested authority of integrated assessment modelin

Low, Sean; Schäfer, Stefan (2020): Is bio-energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS) feasible? The contested authority of integrated assessment modeling. In Energy Research & Social Science 60, p. 101326. DOI: 10.1016/j.erss.2019.101326.

"We find that the competing judgments of BECCS's feasibility, between the IAM community and its critics, reflect and reinforce different understandings of the freedom of scientific inquiry, the mutual influences of science and policy, the shape of science communication, and the necessity of reform. We ask what these claims signal for future activity in this space, and conclude with a call for ‘reflexive’ modeling approaches to bridge perspectives."

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30.09.2019

# New Publications

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Withey, P.; et al. (2019): Quantifying the global warming potential of carbon dioxide emissions from bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

Withey, Patrick; Johnston, Craig; Guo, Jinggang (2019): Quantifying the global warming potential of carbon dioxide emissions from bioenergy with carbon capture and storage. In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 115, S. 109408. DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2019.109408.

"This study provides estimates of the global warming potential (GWP) of carbon dioxide emissions from bioenergy produced from forests (termed GWPbio). The specific contribution of the study is twofold. First, we consider how GWPbio will be impacted by the inclusion of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) technology. Second, we determine how the assumed baseline or reference scenario impacts GWPbio, considering both bioenergy harvests from currently unmanaged land and harvest residues from currently managed forest lands. "

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17.09.2019

# New Publications

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Mayer, Benoit (2019): Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage. Existing and Emerging Legal Principles

Mayer, Benoit (2019): Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage. Existing and Emerging Legal Principles. In Carbon & Climate Law Review 13 (2), pp. 113–121. DOI: 10.21552/cclr/2019/2/6.

"The Paris Agreement was largely understood as an implicit recognition of the need for a large-scale deployment of negative emissions technologies, in particular bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), as part of an enhanced action on climate change mitigation. Yet, a large-scale deployment of BECCS, if feasible at all, would raise serious concerns relating to the social and environmental impacts of bioenergy, the safety of the transportation and the durability of the storage, as well as more general matters of cost-sharing, burden-sharing and responsibilities on the international plane. Although no international law instrument addresses these concerns specifically, some principles of general international law are relevant. Accordingly, this article identifies existing and emerging principles of general international law of relevance to BECCS and discusses the need for and opportunity of further developments."

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06.09.2019

# New Publications

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Daggash, H.; et al. (2019): Higher Carbon Prices on Emissions Alone Will Not Deliver the Paris Agreement

Daggash, Habiba Ahut; Mac Dowell, Niall (2019): Higher Carbon Prices on Emissions Alone Will Not Deliver the Paris Agreement. In: Joule. DOI: 10.1016/j.joule.2019.08.008.

"We investigate the effectiveness of carbon prices in achieving the deep decarbonization needed in the power system. We find that if only CO 2 emitters are penalized, increasing prices to the social cost of carbon is sufficient to achieve a decarbonized system in the medium-term but not maintain it in the long-term."

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05.09.2019

# Media

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Gasworld.com: C-Capture partners with SINTEF in Norway

"C-Capture has been working with Drax Group on a bioenergy and carbon capture and storage (BECCS) project at Drax Power Station."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Stephenson, M. H.; et al. (2019): Geoscience and decarbonization: current status and future directions

Stephenson, Michael H.; Ringrose, Philip; Geiger, Sebastian; Bridden, Michael; Schofield, David (2019): Geoscience and decarbonization: current status and future directions. In Petroleum Geoscience 569, petgeo2019-084. DOI: 10.1144/petgeo2019-084.

"Here we review the role that geoscience and the subsurface could play in decarbonizing electricity production, industry, transport and heating to meet UK and international climate change targets, based on contributions to the 2019 Bryan Lovell meeting held at the Geological Society of London. "

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30.08.2019

# New Publications

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Hohlwegler, P. (2019): Moral Conflicts of several “Green” terrestrial Negative Emission Technologies regarding the Human Right to Adequate Food – A Review

Hohlwegler, Patrick (2019): Moral Conflicts of several “Green” terrestrial Negative Emission Technologies regarding the Human Right to Adequate Food – A Review. In: Adv. Geosci. 49, S. 37–45. DOI: 10.5194/adgeo-49-37-2019.

" In this paper, I investigated whether BECCS, AR and EW would cause moral conflicts regarding the human right to adequate food if implemented on a scale sufficient to limit global warming “to well below 2 C”. Reviewing recent publications concerning BECCS, AR and EW, I found that EW would not conflict with the human right to adequate food but would likely even promote agricultural food production due to a higher nutrient provision."

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30.08.2019

# New Publications

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Crowther, T. W.; et al. (2019): The global soil community and its influence on biogeochemistry

Crowther, T. W.; van den Hoogen, J.; Wan, J.; Mayes, M. A.; Keiser, A. D.; Mo, L. et al. (2019): The global soil community and its influence on biogeochemistry. In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 365 (6455). DOI: 10.1126/science.aav0550.

"Crowther et al. review the state of science relating soil organisms to biogeochemical processes, focusing particularly on the importance of microbial community variation on decomposition and turnover of soil organic matter."

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