04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Dunford, Eric; et al. (2021): Deploying Low Carbon Public Procurement to Accelerate Carbon Removal

Dunford, Eric; Niven, Robert; Neidl, Christopher (2021): Deploying Low Carbon Public Procurement to Accelerate Carbon Removal. In Front. Clim. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fclim.2021.686787.

"Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) will be required to keep global temperature rise below 2°C based on IPCC models. Greater adoption of carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies will drive demand for CDR. Public procurement of low carbon materials is a powerful and under-utilized tool for accelerating the development and of CCUS through a targeted and well-regulated approach. The policy environment is nascent and presents significant barriers for scaling and guiding emerging technology solutions. The concrete sector has unique attributes that make it ideally suited for large-scale low-carbon public procurement strategies. This sector offers immediate opportunities to study the efficacy of a supportive policy and regulatory environment in driving the growth of CCUS solutions."

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04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Goode, P. R.; et al. (2021): Earth's Albedo 1998–2017 as Measured From Earthshine

Goode, P. R.; Pallé, E.; Shoumko, A.; Shoumko, S.; Montañes‐Rodriguez, P.; Koonin, S. E. (2021): Earth's Albedo 1998–2017 as Measured From Earthshine. In Geophysical Research Letters 48 (17). DOI: 10.1029/2021GL094888.

"The reflectance of the Earth is a fundamental climate parameter that we measured from Big Bear Solar Observatory between 1998 and 2017 by observing the earthshine using modern photometric techniques to precisely determine daily, monthly, seasonal, yearly and decadal changes in terrestrial albedo from earthshine. We find the inter-annual fluctuations in albedo to be global, while the large variations in albedo within individual nights and seasonal wanderings tend to average out over each year. We measure a gradual, but climatologically significant urn:x-wiley:00948276:media:grl62955:grl62955-math-00010.5 W/m2 decline in the global albedo over the two decades of data. We found no correlation between the changes in the terrestrial albedo and measures of solar activity. The inter-annual pattern of earthshine fluctuations are in good agreement with those measured by CERES (data began in 2001) even though the satellite observations are sensitive to retroflected light while earthshine is sensitive to wide-angle reflectivity. The CERES decline is about twice that of earthshine."

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04.10.2021

# New Publications

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Wood, Robert (2021): Assessing the potential efficacy of marine cloud brightening for cooling Earth using a simple heuristic model

Wood, Robert (2021): Assessing the potential efficacy of marine cloud brightening for cooling Earth using a simple heuristic model. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 21 (19), pp. 14507–14533. DOI: 10.5194/acp-21-14507-2021.

"A simple heuristic model is described to assess the potential for increasing solar reflection by augmenting the aerosol population below marine low clouds, which nominally leads to increased cloud droplet concentration and albedo. The model estimates the collective impact of many point source particle sprayers, each of which generates a plume of injected particles that affects clouds over a limited area."

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01.10.2021

# Media

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The Economist: Floating offshore farms should increase production of seaweed

"In many places where seaweed used to thrive, often growing in vast “forests”, it is disappearing. The cause is global warming, which, by heating the ocean’s upper layer, reduces its density through thermal expansion—thus making it more buoyant. That extra buoyancy means it is less likely to mix with cooler, denser and more nutrient-rich waters below. This is bad for the marine environment in general. More specifically, it is bad for commercial seaweed farming, a business with revenues of (depending on whom you ask) between $6bn and $40bn a year."

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01.10.2021

# Media

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The New York Times: What’s the Least Bad Way to Cool the Planet?

"How to cool the planet? The energy infrastructure that powers our civilization must be rebuilt, replacing fossil fuels with carbon-free sources such as solar or nuclear. But even then, zeroing out emissions will not cool the planet. This is a direct consequence of the single most important fact about climate change: Warming is proportional to the cumulative emissions over the industrial era. [...] To cool the planet in this century, humans must either remove carbon from the air or use solar geoengineering, a temporary measure that may reduce peak temperatures, extreme storms and other climatic changes. Humans might make the planet Earth more reflective by adding tiny sulfuric acid droplets to the stratosphere from aircraft, whitening low-level clouds over the ocean by spraying sea salt into the air or by other interventions."

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01.10.2021

# Media

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The Guardian: Geoengineering by Gernot Wagner review – a stark warning

"Spraying aerosols into the atmosphere may be fraught with risk, but to dismiss it out of hand is irresponsible, a climate scientist argues."

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30.09.2021

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: 2nd International Conference on Negative CO2 Emissions

Deadline: 1. December 2021

"The objective of the Paris Agreement is to limit global warming to well below 2ºC, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5ºC. The carbon budget is the amount of carbon dioxide that we can emit while still limiting global temperature rise to a given level, for example 1.5ºC.The exact size of the carbon budget is uncertain and depends on many factors, including potential future warming of non-CO2 climate forcers. This said, the remaining budgets for limiting the warming to 1.5ºC or 2ºC have been estimated at about 420 and 1170 Gt of CO2 . With unchanged present emissions at about 40 Gt CO2/year these budgets would be exhausted in as few as 10 and 30 years, respectively. Most of the IPCC emission scenarios that meet a global two-degree target in 2100 overshoot the carbon budget at first and then remove the excess carbon with large negative emissions, typically on the order of 400‑800 Gt CO2 up to 2100.At the same time as negative emissions appear to be indispensable to meet adopted climate targets, the large future negative emissions assumed in climate models have been questioned and warnings have been raised about relying on very large and uncertain negative emissions in the future. With the future climate at stake, a deeper and fuller understanding of the various aspects of negative emissions is needed."

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30.09.2021

# Media

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Advocate Tribune: Major "Carbon Capture" project to bring environmental health and jobs through $4.5 billion dollar investment

"Granite Falls received some exciting news in terms of carbon capture development and local ethanol industry impact through the recent announcement by Summit Carbon Solutions who presented to the Yellow Medicine County Board on August 24."

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30.09.2021

# New Publications

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Alcalde, Juan; et al. (2021): A criteria-driven approach to the CO2 storage site selection of East Mey for the acorn project in the North Sea

Alcalde, Juan; Heinemann, Niklas; James, Alan; Bond, Clare E.; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mackay, Eric J. et al. (2021): A criteria-driven approach to the CO2 storage site selection of East Mey for the acorn project in the North Sea. In Marine and Petroleum Geology 133, p. 105309. DOI: 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2021.105309.

"Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an essential tool in the fight against climate change. Any prospective storage site must meet various criteria that ensure the effectiveness, safety and economic viability of the storage operations. Finding the most suitable site for the storage of the captured CO2 is an essential part of the CCS chain of activity. This work addresses the site selection of a second site for the Acorn CCS project, a project designed to develop a scalable, full-chain CCS project in the North Sea (offshore northeast Scotland). This secondary site has been designed to serve as a backup and upscaling option for the Acorn Site, and has to satisfy pivotal project requirements such as low cost and high storage potential."

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30.09.2021

# Calls & events

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Call for Submissions: Technological Innovations and Climate Change: Negative Emissions Technologies

"The Environmental Audit Committee is conducting an overarching inquiry looking at technological innovations which could contribute to tackling climate change. The next aspect of the inquiry will look at Negative Emissions Technologies."

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