27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Robrecht, S.; et al. (2019): Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer, Atmos

Robrecht, S., Vogel, B., Grooß, J.-U., Rosenlof, K., Thornberry, T., Rollins, A., Krämer, M., Christensen, L., and Müller, R. (2019): Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5805-5833, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5805-2019, 2019.
 
"Water vapour convectively injected into the mid-latitude lowermost stratosphere could affect stratospheric ozone. The associated potential ozone loss process requires low temperatures together with elevated water vapour mixing ratios. Since this ozone loss is initiated by heterogeneous chlorine activation on liquid aerosols, an increase in sulfate aerosol surface area due to a volcanic eruption or geoengineering could increase the likelihood of its occurrence. [...] Here, we analyse the ozone loss mechanism and its sensitivity to various stratospheric conditions in detail. By conducting a box-model study with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS), chemistry was simulated along a 7 d backward trajectory."
 

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24.05.2019

# New Publications

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Bluemling, B.; et al. (2019): Seeding the clouds to reach the sky. Will China's weather modification practices support the legitimization of climate engineering?

Bluemling, B.; Kim, R.; Biermann, F. (2019): Seeding the clouds to reach the sky. Will China's weather modification practices support the legitimization of climate engineering? In AMBIO. DOI: 10.1007/s13280-019-01180-3.

"In this Perspective, we discuss whether in times of quickly proceeding global environmental change, radical global interventions like “climate engineering” may gain legitimacy in China and eventually be deployed or supported. We argue that one cornerstone for whether climate engineering, and solar radiation management in particular, could gain legitimacy in China, is its current weather modification programme."

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23.05.2019

# New Publications

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Jackson, R. B.; et al. (2019): Methane removal and atmospheric restoration

Jackson, R. B.; Solomon, E. I.; Canadell, J. G.; Cargnello, M.; Field, C. B. (2019): Methane removal and atmospheric restoration. In Nature Sustainability 10, p. 405. DOI: 10.1038/s41893-019-0299-x.

"Zeolites and other technologies should be evaluated and pursued for reducing methane concentrations in the atmosphere from 1,860 ppb to preindustrial levels of ~750 ppb. Such a goal of atmospheric restoration provides a positive framework for change at a time when climate action is desperately needed."

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23.05.2019

# Media

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Forbes: Capitalism vs Climate Change: Front Line Interview I

"After publishing my last article about Carbon Engineering – the Canadian firm founded by brilliant Harvard scientist, David Keith – I spent some time talking with three investors on the front line of climate change investing; they all recently became partial owners of Carbon Engineering by investing in its $68 million capital raise."

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21.05.2019

# Media

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Financial Buzz: Oxy Low Carbon Ventures and Carbon Engineering begin engineering of the worlds largest Direct Air Capture and sequestration plant

"Oxy Low Carbon Ventures, LLC (OLCV), a subsidiary of Occidental, and Carbon Engineering Ltd. (CE), a Canadian clean energy company, today announced they are jointly proceeding with the engineering and design of the world’s largest Direct Air Capture (DAC) and sequestration facility. The companies are evaluating a facility designed to capture 500 kilotonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) directly from the atmosphere each year, which would be used in Occidental’s enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations and subsequently stored underground permanently. The plant would be located in the Permian Basin."

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20.05.2019

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 21 of 2019

The newsletter of calendar week 21 in 2019 is now available here.


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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Giri, Chaitanya (2019): Making Terrestrial Geoengineering Technologies Viable. An Opportunity for India-Canada Climate Leadership

Giri, Chaitanya (2019): Making Terrestrial Geoengineering Technologies Viable. An Opportunity for India-Canada Climate Leadership. Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) (Canada-India Track 1.5 Dialogue Paper, 3).

"In an acknowledgment that emissions-reduction alone will not resolve the unfolding climate crisis, a call has been made for the development of carbon sinks to remove gases already in the atmosphere. These less-heralded greenhouse gas removal technologies are essential to achieving the pact’s goal of keeping the global average surface temperature from rising more than the 1.5 degrees Celsius. These steps are also a key to ensuring that India and Canada meet their ambitious climate-action goals without suffering severe socio-economic and climatic harm."

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Herington, Jonathan (2019): Security, Planning and Justice. A Reply to Mintz-Woo

Herington, Jonathan (2019): Security, Planning and Justice. A Reply to Mintz-Woo. In Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (3), pp. 387–390. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562531.

"In a recent paper (Herington, 2017), I argued that the mere risk of climate-related harm was itself a harm, since it undermined the security of individuals subject to that risk. In his commentary, Mintz-Woo (2019) argues that my account of the value of security is mistaken. On his view, the value of belief-relative security is already well captured by standard theories of wellbeing, and the value of fact-relative security is illusory. In the following, I attempt to respond to his concerns."

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Mintz-Woo, Kian (2018): Security and Distribution, or Should You Care about Merely Possible Losses?

Mintz-Woo, Kian (2018): Security and Distribution, or Should You Care about Merely Possible Losses? In Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (3), pp. 382–386. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562532.

"Jonathan Herington argues that harms can occur whether or not there is actually a loss. He claims that subjectively or objectively merely being at risk of losing access to basic goods is sufficient for lowering that individual’s well-being for the value of ‘security’. I challenge whether losing access to basic goods is sufficient to justify the introduction of this value. I also point to some issues in his interpretation of IPCC risk categories and the social science research he relies on."

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20.05.2019

# New Publications

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Smith, Patrick Taylor (2019): Legitimacy and Non-Domination in Solar Radiation Management Research

Smith, Patrick Taylor (2019): Legitimacy and Non-Domination in Solar Radiation Management Research. In Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (3), pp. 341–361. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562528.

"he purpose of this paper is to explore what I take to be a significant limitation of the proposed regimes: their failure to grapple with the significant power imbalances between the scientific and policy-making communities of the developed world doing the research and those of the developing world that will suffer the worst consequences of both climate change and climate engineering. This paper will argue that the value of non-domination, including and especially how it relates to global inequality, should guide our thinking about how to legitimately engage in research into solar radiation management."

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