02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Baird, J. (2019): The integrated thermodynamic geoengineering/negative emissions OTEC model

Baird, Jim (2019): The integrated thermodynamic geoengineering/negative emissions OTEC model. Energy Central. Available online at https://www.energycentral.com/c/ec/integrated-thermodynamic-geoengineeringnegative-emissions-otec-model.

"The solution advanced in this paper is an amalgam of energy production through the conversion of the heat of global warming to productive energy, (thermodynamic geoengineering (TG)), solar radiation management (SRM) through load balancing trapped solar energy and carbon-dioxide removal (CDR) thru negative-CO2-emissions ocean thermal energy conversion (NEOTEC)."

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02.09.2019

# Media

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The Guardian: The wrong kind of trees: Ireland's afforestation meets resistance

"Residents and campaigners say fast-growing Sitka spruces are spoiling the landscape."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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St Pierre, K. A.; et al. (2019): Proglacial freshwaters are significant and previously unrecognized sinks of atmospheric CO2

St Pierre, Kyra A.; St Louis, Vincent L.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Lehnherr, Igor; Dainard, Paul G.; Gardner, Alex S. et al. (2019): Proglacial freshwaters are significant and previously unrecognized sinks of atmospheric CO2. In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1904241116.

"As many of the world’s rivers originate from glacial headwaters, we highlight the potential importance of this process for contemporary regional carbon budgets in rapidly changing high-latitude and high-altitude watersheds."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Tan, R. R.; et al. (2019): A linear program for optimizing enhanced weathering networks

Tan, Raymond R.; Aviso, Kathleen B. (2019): A linear program for optimizing enhanced weathering networks. In Results in Engineering 3, p. 100028. DOI: 10.1016/j.rineng.2019.100028.

"The model proposed here can determine optimal matches of sources and sinks in EW-based CMNs, considering material flow and temporal constraints. A case study is solved to illustrate the model."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Froehlich, H. E.; et al. (2019): Blue Growth Potential to Mitigate Climate Change through Seaweed Offsetting

Froehlich, Halley E.; Afflerbach, Jamie C.; Frazier, Melanie; Halpern, Benjamin S. (2019): Blue Growth Potential to Mitigate Climate Change through Seaweed Offsetting. In Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2019.07.041.

"Synthesizing data from scientific literature, we assess the extent and cost of scaling seaweed aquaculture to provide sufficient CO2eq sequestration for several climate change mitigation scenarios, with a focus on the food sector—a major source of greenhouse gases. Given known ecological constraints (nutrients and temperature), we found a substantial suitable area (ca. 48 million km2) for seaweed farming, which is largely unfarmed."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Petrou, K.; et al. (2019): Acidification diminishes diatom silica production in the Southern Ocean

Petrou, Katherina; Baker, Kirralee G.; Nielsen, Daniel A.; Hancock, Alyce M.; Schulz, Kai G.; Davidson, Andrew T. (2019): Acidification diminishes diatom silica production in the Southern Ocean. In Nature Climate change 462, p. 346. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0557-y.

"Here we show that diatom silicification strongly diminishes with increased acidity in a natural Antarctic community. Analyses of single cells from within the community reveal that the effect of reduced pH on silicification differs among taxa, with several species having significantly reduced silica incorporation at CO2 levels equivalent to those projected for 2100."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Stover, D. (2019): Dominic Woolf: Studying soil and biochar for carbon dioxide removal

Stover, Dawn (2019): Dominic Woolf: Studying soil and biochar for carbon dioxide removal. In Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 75 (5), pp. 229–235. DOI: 10.1080/00963402.2019.1654265.

"In this interview, Dominic Woolf, a senior research associate at Cornell University, describes a potential method for removing excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere: converting biomass into a long-lived, charcoal-like material that would be added to soil. "

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Beerling, D. J. (2019): Can plants help us avoid seeding a human‐made climate catastrophe?

Beerling, David J. (2019): Can plants help us avoid seeding a human‐made climate catastrophe? In Plants People Planet 354, p. 139. DOI: 10.1002/ppp3.10066.

"Human‐made climate change places the future of the planet in peril. Rapid greenhouse gas emissions over the past few decades already commit Earth to a warmer climate state and lock‐in future extinctions. I consider what steps might be taken to protect the climate and the future of the biosphere by drawing on our understanding of the Devonian rise of forests."

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02.09.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Papers: Nature as Climate Solution? Exploring the Political Ecologies of Nature-based Carbon Removal (POLLEN 20)

Deadline: 10. October 2019

"This session aims to mobilize the extensive knowledge on forest governance and REDD+ (among others) within the political ecology community and use it to reflect on the wider and emerging discourse of nature-based climate solutions."

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02.09.2019

# New Publications

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Terrer, C.; et al. (2019): Nitrogen and phosphorus constrain the CO 2 fertilization of global plant biomass

Terrer, César; Jackson, Robert B.; Prentice, I. Colin; Keenan, Trevor F.; Kaiser, Christina; Vicca, Sara et al. (2019): Nitrogen and phosphorus constrain the CO 2 fertilization of global plant biomass. In Nat. Clim. Chang. 9 (9), pp. 684–689. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0545-2.

"The global-scale response to eCO2 we derive from experiments is similar to past changes in greenness9 and biomass10with rising CO2, suggesting that CO2 will continue to stimulate plant biomass in the future despite the constraining effect of soil nutrients. Our research reconciles conflicting evidence on CO2 fertilization across scales and provides an empirical estimate of the biomass sensitivity to eCO2 that may help to constrain climate projections."

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