08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Yao, J.; et al. (2018): Modeling the effects of land-use optimization on the soil organic carbon sequestration potential

Yao, J.; Kong, X. (2018): Modeling the effects of land-use optimization on the soil organic carbon sequestration potential. In: J. Geogr. Sci. 28 (11), S. 1641–1658. DOI: 10.1007/s11442-018-1534-5.

"This research provides evidence to guide planning authorities in conducting land-use optimization strategies and estimating their effects on the carbon sequestration function of land-use systems."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Gattuso, J.; et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems

Gattuso, J.; Magnan, A.; Bopp, L.; Cheung, W.; Duarte, C.; Hinkel, J. et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 5, S. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00337.

"A comprehensive and systematic assessment of 13 global- and local-scale, ocean-based measures was performed to help steer the development and implementation of technologies and actions toward a sustainable outcome. We show that (1) all measures have tradeoffs and multiple criteria must be used for a comprehensive assessment of their potential, (2) greatest benefit is derived by combining global and local solutions, some of which could be implemented or scaled-up immediately, (3) some measures are too uncertain to be recommended yet, (4) political consistency must be achieved through effective cross-scale governance mechanisms, (5) scientific effort must focus on effectiveness, co-benefits, disbenefits, and costs of poorly tested as well as new and emerging measures."

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03.10.2018

# New Publications

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Chhetri, N.; et al. (2018): Governing Solar Radiation Management

Chhetri, N.; Chong, D.; Conca, K.; Falk, R.; Gillespie, A.; Gupta, A.; et al. (2018): Governing Solar Radiation Management. DOI:10.17606/M6SM17

"This report offers a detailed examination, by a team of global governance experts, of governance needs and options for Solar Radiation Management (SRM) technologies. The report focuses on near-term governance, outlining feasible and needed actions that can be taken by approximately 2025, at the national, regional, and international levels and by non-state actors."

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30.09.2018

# New Publications

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Dietz, S.; et al. (2018): The Economics of 1.5°C Climate Change

Dietz, S.; Bowen, A.; Doda, B.; Gambhir, A.; Warren, R. (2018): The Economics of 1.5°C Climate Change. In: Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 43 (1). DOI: 10.1146/annurev-environ-102017-025817.

"Setting off with higher emissions will make 1.5°C unattainable quickly without recourse to expensive large-scale carbon dioxide removal (CDR), or solar radiation management (SRM), which can be cheap but poses ambiguous risks society seems unwilling to take. Carbon pricing could reduce mitigation costs substantially compared with ramping up the current patchwork of regulatory instruments. Nonetheless, a mix of policies is justified and technology-specific approaches may be required. It is particularly important to step up mitigation finance to developing countries, where emissions abatement is relatively cheap."

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30.09.2018

# New Publications

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Carlson, C.; et al. (2018): Climate engineering needs a clean bill of health

Carlson, C.; Trisos, C. (2018): Climate engineering needs a clean bill of health. In: Nature Climate change 8 (10), S. 843–845. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-018-0294-7.

"Climate change will almost certainly cause millions of deaths. Climate engineering might prevent this, but benefits — and risks — remain mostly unevaluated. Now is the time to bring planetary health research into climate engineering conversations."

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25.09.2018

# New Publications

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Schmidt, H.; et al. (2018): Pyrogenic carbon capture and storage

Schmidt, H.; Anca-Couce, A.; Hagemann, N.; Werner, C.; Gerten, D.; Lucht, W.; Kammann, C. (2018): Pyrogenic carbon capture and storage. In: GCB Bioenergy 38 (1), S. 215. DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12553.

"During the last decade, biochar has been discussed as a promising option to improve soil fertility and sequester carbon, although the carbon efficiency of the thermal conversion of biomass into biochar is in the range of 30%–50% only. So far, the liquid and gaseous pyrolysis products were mainly considered for combustion, though they can equally be processed into recalcitrant forms suitable for carbon sequestration. In this review, we show that pyrolytic carbon capture and storage (PyCCS) can aspire for carbon sequestration efficiencies of >70%, which is shown to be an important threshold to allow PyCCS to become a relevant negative emission technology."

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24.09.2018

# New Publications

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Wohland, J.; et al. (2018): Negative emission potential of Direct Air Capture powered by renewable excess electricity in Europe

Wohland, J.; Witthaut, D.; Schleussner, C. (2018): Negative emission potential of Direct Air Capture powered by renewable excess electricity in Europe. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF000954.

"Our results show that negative emissions of up to 500 MtCO2/y in Europe may be achievable by using renewable excess energy only. Electricity systems with high shares of volatile renewables will induce excess generation events during which electricity is cheap thereby lowering the operational costs of DAC. If investment costs can be sufficiently reduced, this may render very energy intensive but highly flexible technologies such as DAC viable."

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23.09.2018

# New Publications

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Blackstock, J.; et al. (2018): Geoengineering our climate? Ethics, politics and governance

Blackstock, J.; Low, S. (Hg.) (2019): Geoengineering our climate? Ethics, politics and governance. Abingdon, Oxon, New York, NY: Routledge (Science in society series). DOI: 9781849713733

"In this important book, a diverse collection of scholars, policymakers, and civil society representatives examine and reflect upon the global geoengineering debate they have helped shape. Opening with essays examining the historic origins of contemporary geoengineering ideas, the book goes on to explore the practical and ethical dilemmas geoengineering poses; the evolving geoengineering research agenda; the challenges geoengineering technologies present to current international legal and political frameworks; differing perceptions of geoengineering from around the world; and how geoengineering technologies might be governed if/as they begin to emerge from the lab into the real world."

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20.09.2018

# New Publications

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Torvanger, A. (2018): Governance of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS): accounting, rewarding, and the Paris agreement

Torvanger, Asbjørn (2018): Governance of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS): accounting, rewarding, and the Paris agreement. In: Climate Policy, S. 1–13. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2018.1509044.

"This study aims to identify pragmatic ways forward for BECCS, through synthesizing the literature relevant to accounting and rewarding BECCS, and its relation to the Paris Agreement. BECCS is divided into its two elements: biomass and CCS."

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20.09.2018

# New Publications

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Gardiner, S.; et al. (2018): The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach

Gardiner, S.; Fragnière, A. (2018): The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 21 (2), S. 143–174. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1509472.

"This article offers a constructive critique of the Oxford Principles for the governance of geoengineering and proposes an alternative set of principles, the Tollgate Principles, based on that critique. Our main concern is that, despite their many merits, the Oxford Principles remain largely instrumental and dominated by procedural considerations; therefore, they fail to lay the groundwork sufficiently for the more substantive ethical debate that is needed. The article aims to address this gap by making explicit many of the important ethical questions lurking in the background, especially around values such as justice, respect and legitimacy."

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