14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Preston, C.; et al. (2019): Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach

Preston, C.; Carr, W. (2019): Recognitional Justice, Climate Engineering, and the Care Approach. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 4 (7), S. 1–16. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562527.

"Given the existing inequities in climate change, any proposed climate engineering strategy to solve the climate problem must meet a high threshold for justice. In contrast to an overly thin paradigm for justice that demands only a science-based assessment of potential temperature-related benefits and harms, we argue for the importance of attention to recognitional justice."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Jinnah, S.; et al. (2019): Toward Legitimate Governance of Solar Geoengineering Research

Jinnah, S.; Nicholson, S.; Flegal, J. (2019): Toward Legitimate Governance of Solar Geoengineering Research. A Role for Sub-State Actors. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 6 (3), S. 1–20. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562526.

"Two recently proposed solar radiation management (SRM) experiments in the United States have highlighted the need for governance mechanisms to guide SRM research. This paper draws on the literatures on legitimacy in global governance, responsible innovation, and experimental governance to argue that public engagement is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for any legitimate SRM governance regime."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Kravitz, B. (2019): Mission-driven research for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1811022116.

"The last decade has seen broad exploratory research into stratospheric aerosol (SA) geoengineering, motivated by concern that reducing greenhouse gas emissions may be insufficient to avoid significant impacts from climate change. [...] We highlight two important observations that follow from considering such a comprehensive, prioritized natural-science research effort. First, while field experiments may eventually be needed to reduce some of the uncertainties, we expect that the next phase of research will continue to be primarily model-based, with one outcome being to assess and prioritize which uncertainties need to be reduced (and, as a corollary, which field experiments can reduce those uncertainties). Second, we anticipate a clear separation in scale and character between small-scale experimental research to resolve specific process uncertainties and global-scale activities."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Pfrommer, T.; et al. (2019): Establishing causation in climate litigation

Pfrommer, T.; Goeschl, T.; Proelss, A.; Carrier, M.; Lenhard, J.; Martin, H. et al. (2019): Establishing causation in climate litigation. Admissibility and reliability. In: Climatic Change 421 (6926), S. 891. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-018-2362-4.

"Climate litigation has attracted renewed interest as a governance tool. A key challenge in climate litigation is to assess the factual basis of causation. Extreme weather attribution, specifically the Fraction of Attributable Risk (FAR), has been proposed as a way to tackle this challenge. What remains unclear is how attribution science interacts with the legal admissibility of evidence based on climate models. "

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04.01.2019

# New Publications

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Baldocchi, D.; et al. (2018): The Physics and Ecology of Mining Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere by Ecosystems

Baldocchi, D.; Penuelas, J. (2018): The Physics and Ecology of Mining Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere by Ecosystems. In: Glob Chang Biol. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14559.

"In this paper, we articulate a series of key take‐home points. First, the potential amount of carbon an ecosystem can assimilate on an annual basis scales with absorbed sunlight, which varies with latitude, leaf area index and available water. [...] We based our analysis on 1163 site‐years of direct eddy covariance measurements of gross and net carbon fluxes from 155 sites across the globe."

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04.01.2019

# New Publications

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van der Spek, M.; et al. (2017): Challenges and uncertainties of ex ante techno-economic analysis of low TRL CO2 capture technology: Lessons from a case study of an NGCC with exhaust gas recycle and electric swing adsorption

van der Spek, M.; Ramirez, A.; Faaij, A. (2017): Challenges and uncertainties of ex ante techno-economic analysis of low TRL CO2 capture technology: Lessons from a case study of an NGCC with exhaust gas recycle and electric swing adsorption. In: Applied Energy 208, S. 920–934. DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.09.058.

"The paper shows that for meaningful comparison with incumbent technologies, the performance of very early stage technologies needs to be projected to a future, commercial state. To this end, the state of the art methods have to be adapted to control for the development and improvements that these technologies will undergo during the R&D cycle. We call this a hybrid approach. The paper also shows that CO2 capture technologies always need to be assessed in sympathy with the CO2 source (e.g. power plant) and compression plant, because otherwise unreliable conclusions could be drawn on their feasibility."

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30.12.2018

# New Publications

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Zhang, Z.; et al. (2019): In-situ ion-activated carbon nanospheres with tunable ultramicroporosity for superior CO2 capture

Zhang, Z.; Luo, D.; Lui, G.; Li, G.; Jiang, G.; Cano, Z. et al. (2019): In-situ ion-activated carbon nanospheres with tunable ultramicroporosity for superior CO2 capture. In: Carbon 143, S. 531–541. DOI: 10.1016/j.carbon.2018.10.096.

"Ultramicroporous carbon materials play a critical role in CO2 capture and separation, however facile approaches to design ultramicroporous carbon with controllable amount, ratio and size of pores are still challenging. [...] This work provides a novel and facile guideline to engineer carbon materials with abundant and tunable ultramicroporosity towards superior CO2 capture performance, which also delivers great potential in extensive applications such as water purification, catalysis, and energy storage."

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28.12.2018

# New Publications

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Chen, Y.; et al. (2019): Economic losses of carbon emissions from circum-Arctic permafrost regions under RCP-SSP scenarios

Chen, Y.; Liu, A.; Zhang, Z.; Hope, C.; Crabbe, J. (2019): Economic losses of carbon emissions from circum-Arctic permafrost regions under RCP-SSP scenarios. In: Science of the Total Environment 658, S. 1064–1068. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.12.299.

"In this study, we use the PInc-PanTher model to estimate carbon emissions from thawing permafrost in the circum-Arctic during 2010–2100 followed by the PAGE09 integrated assessment model to evaluate the net economic losses caused by these permafrost carbon emissions."

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24.12.2018

# New Publications

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Gambhir, A.; et al. (2018): Energy system changes in 1.5 °C, well below 2 °C and 2 °C scenarios

Gambhir, A.; Rogelj, J.; Luderer, G.; Few, S.; Napp, T. (2019): Energy system changes in 1.5 °C, well below 2 °C and 2 °C scenarios. In: Energy Strategy Reviews 23, S. 69–80. DOI: 10.1016/j.esr.2018.12.006.

"We specifically assess differences in a range of near-term indicators describing CO2 emissions reductions pathways, changes in primary energy and final energy across the economy's major sectors, in addition to more detailed metrics around the use of carbon capture and storage (CCS), negative emissions, low-carbon electricity and hydrogen."

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24.12.2018

# New Publications

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Beckman, R.; et al. (2018): High seas governance. Gaps and challenges

Beckman, R.; McCreath, M.; Roach, A. (Hg.) (2018): High seas governance. Gaps and challenges. Leiden: Brill Nijhoff (Publications on ocean development, 86). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004373303_004

"This chapter examines the legal framework for marine geoengineering, analysing the extent to which the modern law of the sea has responded to the gaps and challenges in the current regulatory framework. It will focus on adapting existing environmental and other principles within the framework of unclos to geoengineering, before examining the recent initiative under the 1996 London Protocol to develop a designated regime to regulate ocean fertilisation."

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