25.10.2018

# New Publications

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Brethomé, F.; et al. (2018): Direct air capture of CO2 via aqueous-phase absorption and crystalline-phase release using concentrated solar power

Brethomé, F.; Williams, N.; Seipp, C.; Kidder, M.; Custelcean, R. (2018): Direct air capture of CO2 via aqueous-phase absorption and crystalline-phase release using concentrated solar power. In: Nat. Energy 3 (7), S. 553–559. DOI: 10.1038/s41560-018-0150-z.

"Direct air capture of carbon dioxide offers the prospect of permanently lowering the atmospheric CO2 concentration, providing that economical and energy-efficient technologies can be developed and deployed on a large scale. Here, we report an approach to direct air capture, at the laboratory scale, using mostly off-the-shelf materials and equipment. First, CO2 absorption is achieved with readily available and environmentally friendly aqueous amino acid solutions (glycine and sarcosine) using a household humidifier."

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24.10.2018

# New Publications

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Soldatenko, S. A.; et al. (2018): Optimal Control of Aerosol Emissions into the Stratosphere to Stabilize the Earth’s Climate

Soldatenko, S. A.; Yusupov, R. M. (2018): Optimal Control of Aerosol Emissions into the Stratosphere to Stabilize the Earth’s Climate. In: Izvestiya Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics 54 (5), S. 480–486. DOI: 10.1134/S0001433818050122.

"The problem of the optimal control of aerosol emissions into the stratosphere to stabilize the Earth’s climate is considered based on the zero-dimensional energy balance model. The global surface-temperature deviation from the undisturbed value is the state variable, and the albedo of the artificial aerosol layer, whose time variations are functionally related to the change in the total mass of aerosol particles and, consequently, the rate of their emissions, is the control variable."

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22.10.2018

# New Publications

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Turvey, C.; et al. (2018): Hydrotalcites and hydrated Mg-carbonates as carbon sinks in serpentinite mineral wastes from the Woodsreef chrysotile mine, New South Wales, Australia

Turvey, C.; Wilson, S.; Hamilton, J.; Tait, A.; McCutcheon, J.; Beinlich, A. et al. (2018): Hydrotalcites and hydrated Mg-carbonates as carbon sinks in serpentinite mineral wastes from the Woodsreef chrysotile mine, New South Wales, Australia. Controls on carbonate mineralogy and efficiency of CO2 air capture in mine tailings. In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 79, S. 38–60. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.09.015.

"Carbon mineralisation of ultramafic mine tailings can reduce net emissions of anthropogenic carbon dioxide by reacting Mg-silicate and hydroxide minerals with atmospheric CO2 to produce carbonate minerals. We investigate the controls on carbonate mineral formation at the derelict Woodsreef chrysotile mine (New South Wales, Australia). Quantitative XRD was used to understand how mineralogy changes with depth into the tailings pile, and shows that hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O], is present in shallow tailings material (<40 cm), while coalingite [Mg10Fe3+2(CO3)(OH)24·2H2O] and pyroaurite [Mg6Fe3+2(CO3)(OH)16·4H2O] are forming deeper in the tailings material."

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22.10.2018

# New Publications

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Kuzyakov, Y.; et al. (2018): Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes. No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles

Kuzyakov, Y.; Horwath, W.; Dorodnikov, M.; Blagodatskaya, E. (2018): Review and synthesis of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil processes. No changes in pools, but increased fluxes and accelerated cycles. In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry. DOI: 10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.10.005.

"We show that all effects in soil are indirect: they are mediated by plants through increased net primary production and C inputs by roots that foster intensive competition between plants and microorganisms for nutrients. Higher belowground C input from plants under eCO2 is compensated by faster C turnover due to accelerated microbial growth, metabolism and respiration, higher enzymatic activities, and priming of soil C, N and P pools. We compare the effects of eCO2 on pool size and associated fluxes in: soil C stocks vs. belowground C input, microbial biomass vs. CO2 soil efflux vs. various microbial activities and functions, dissolved organic matter content vs. its production, nutrient stocks vs. fluxes etc."

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17.10.2018

# New Publications

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Rabitz, F. (2018): Governing the termination problem in solar radiation management

Rabitz, F. (2018): Governing the termination problem in solar radiation management. In: Environmental Politics 22, S. 1–21. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1519879.

"Technologies for Solar Radiation Management (SRM) could limit global warming by manipulating the Earth’s radiation balance. A major objection to SRM is the termination problem: the catastrophic consequences that are likely to result from its sudden discontinuation. The termination problem limits the reversibility of policy choices and poses the risk of inadvertent or enforced program collapse."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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Yu, Q. (2018): Direct capture of CO2 from ambient air using solid sorbents

Yu, Q. (2018): Direct capture of CO2 from ambient air using solid sorbents. Enschede: University of Twente. DOI:10.3990/1.9789036546300

"In this thesis, a novel process is developed and experimentally demonstrated, for CO2 capture from ambient air to produce CO2 enriched air to enhance microalgae cultivation. First, an amine functionalized sorbent is selected, initially based on its water and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity. Subsequently, the selected sorbent is characterized on its stability under different conditions for a wide range."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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Stephenson, S.; et al. (2018): Climatic Responses to Future Trans-Arctic Shipping

Stephenson, S.; Wang, W.; Zender, C.; Wang, H.; Davis, S.; Rasch, P. (2018): Climatic Responses to Future Trans-Arctic Shipping. In: Geophys. Res. Lett. 75 (2), S. 300. DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078969.

"Here we investigate impacts of shipping emissions on Arctic climate using a fully coupled Earth system model (CESM 1.2.2) and a suite of newly developed projections of 21st‐century trans‐Arctic shipping emissions. We find that trans‐Arctic shipping will reduce Arctic warming by nearly 1 °C by 2099, due to sulfate‐driven liquid water cloud formation. Cloud fraction and liquid water path exhibit significant positive trends, cooling the lower atmosphere and surface."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D. G.; et al. (2019): The Engineering of Climate Engineering

MacMartin, D. G.; Kravitz, B. (2019): The Engineering of Climate Engineering. In: Annu. Rev. Control Robot. Auton. Syst. 2 (1). DOI: 10.1146/annurev-control-053018-023725.

"While reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions remains the most essential element of any strategy to manage climate change risk, it is also in principle possible to directly cool the climate by reflecting some sunlight back to space. Such climate engineering approaches include adding aerosols to the stratosphere and marine cloud brightening. Assessing whether these ideas could reduce risk requires a broad, multidisciplinary research effort spanning climate science, social sciences, and governance."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Hourdequin, M. (2018): Geoengineering Justice

Hourdequin, M. (2018): Geoengineering Justice. In: Science, Technology & Human Values 26 (6), 016224391880289. DOI: 10.1177/0162243918802893.

"Global-scale solar geoengineering raises critical ethical questions, including questions of distributive, procedural, and intergenerational justice. Although geoengineering is sometimes framed as a response to injustice, insofar as it might benefit those most vulnerable to climate-related harms, geoengineering also has the potential to exacerbate climate injustice, especially if control of research, governance, and potential plans for deployment remains concentrated in the hands of a few. The scope and scale of solar geoengineering, the diverse concerns it raises, and the lack of consensus surrounding it pose particular challenges for justice."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Kovenock, M.; et al. (2018): Leaf Trait Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide

Kovenock, M.; Swann, A. (2018): Leaf Trait Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide. In: Global Biogeochem. Cycles 165 (2), S. 351. DOI: 10.1029/2018GB005883.

"Here we show that one leaf trait acclimation in response to elevated carbon dioxide—a one‐third increase in leaf mass per area—significantly impacts climate and carbon cycling in Earth system model experiments. Global net primary productivity decreases (−5.8 PgC/year, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] −5.5 to −6.0), representing a decreased carbon dioxide sink of similar magnitude to current annual fossil fuel emissions (8 PgC/year)."

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