28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Haque, F.; et al. (2019): Co-Benefits of Wollastonite Weathering in Agriculture: CO2 Sequestration and Promoted Plant Growth

Haque, F.; Santos, R.; Dutta, A.; Thimmanagari, M.; Chiang, Y. (2019): Co-Benefits of Wollastonite Weathering in Agriculture: CO 2 Sequestration and Promoted Plant Growth. In: ACS Omega 4 (1), S. 1425–1433. DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.8b02477.

"To lock atmospheric CO2 at anthropogenic timescale, fast weathering silicates can be applied to soil to speed up natural CO2 sequestration via enhanced weathering. Agricultural lands offer large area for silicate application, but expected weathering rates as a function of soil and crop type, and potential impacts on the crops, are not well known. This study investigated the role of plants on enhanced weathering of wollastonite (CaSiO3) in soils."

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27.01.2019

# New Publications

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Rosenfeld, D.; et al. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds

Rosenfeld, D.; Zhu, Y.; Wang, M.; Zheng, Y.; Goren, T.; Yu, S. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds. In: Science (New York, N.Y.). DOI: 10.1126/science.aav0566.

"Lack of reliable estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) aerosols over oceans has severely limited our ability to quantify their effects on cloud properties and extent of cooling by reflecting solar radiation – a key uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing. Here we introduce a methodology for ascribing cloud properties to CCN and isolating the aerosol effects from meteorological effects."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies

Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies. In: TREVOR M. LETCHER (Hg.): MANAGING GLOBAL WARMING. An interface of technology and human issues. [S.l.]: ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS, S. 639–657.

"This chapter gives a brief overview of the emergence of the idea of negative emissions technologies and solar radiation management technologies in climate change policy and the normative issues—questions of values—that they might raise. Normative issues fall into four broad categories: (1) distributive justice, (2) procedural justice, (3) ethical issues, and (4) rectificatory justice."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Callies, D. (2019): Institutional Legitimacy and Geoengineering Governance

Callies, D. (2019): Institutional Legitimacy and Geoengineering Governance. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 26 (1), S. 1–17. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562523.

"There is general agreement amongst those involved in the normative discussion about geoengineering that if we are to move forward with significant research, development, and certainly any future deployment, legitimate governance is a must. However, while we agree that the abstract concept of legitimacy ought to guide geoengineering governance, agreement surrounding the appropriate conception of legitimacy has yet to emerge."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Hourdequin, M. (2019): Climate Change, Climate Engineering, and the ‘Global Poor’

Hourdequin, M. (2019): Climate Change, Climate Engineering, and the ‘Global Poor’. What Does Justice Require? In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 19 (6), S. 1–19. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562525.

"In recent work, Joshua Horton and David Keith argue on distributive and consequentialist grounds that research into solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering is justified because the resulting knowledge has the potential to benefit everyone, particularly the ‘global poor.’ I argue that this view overlooks procedural and recognitional justice, and thus relegates to the background questions of how SRM research should be governed."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Sikka, T. (2019): Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice. The Standpoint of the Vulnerable

Sikka, T. (2019): Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice. The Standpoint of the Vulnerable. Cham, Cham: Springer International Publishing; Springer (SpringerBriefs in Sociology). pp. 15-44.

"This Chapter provides an overview of geoengineering research, including the status of current research and testing, the significance of modeling and simulation, the role of public participation, and the subject of governance. A discussion of geoengineering’s basic epistemology, values and background assumptions is also included with specific attention paid to the solar radiation management technique of atmospheric sulfate geoengineering."

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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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May, M.; et al. (2019): ESD Ideas. Photoelectrochemical carbon removal as negative emission technology

May, M.; Rehfeld, K. (2019): ESD Ideas. Photoelectrochemical carbon removal as negative emission technology. In: Earth Syst. Dynam. 10 (1), S. 1–7. DOI: 10.5194/esd-10-1-2019.

"The pace of the transition to a low-carbon economy – especially in the fuels sector – is not high enough to achieve the 2°C target limit for global warming by only cutting emissions. Most political roadmaps to tackle global warming implicitly rely on the timely availability of mature negative emission technologies, which actively invest energy to remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store it permanently."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Daggash, H.; et al. (2019): The role and value of negative emissions technologies in decarbonising the UK energy system

Daggash, H.; Heuberger, C.; Mac Dowell, N. (2019): The role and value of negative emissions technologies in decarbonising the UK energy system. In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 81, S. 181–198. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.12.019.

"This study, via a power supply capacity expansion model, investigates the potential role of bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and direct air capture and storage (DACS) in meeting the UK's emissions reduction targets. We show that to achieve power sector decarbonisation, a system dominated by firm and dispatchable low-carbon generators with BECCS or DACS to compensate for their associated emissions is significantly cheaper than a system dominated by intermittent renewables and energy storage."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Kolosz, B.; et al. (2019): CASPER. A modelling framework to link mineral carbonation with the turnover of organic matter in soil

Kolosz, B.; Sohi, S.; Manning, D. (2019): CASPER. A modelling framework to link mineral carbonation with the turnover of organic matter in soil. In: Computers & Geosciences 124, S. 58–71. DOI: 10.1016/j.cageo.2018.12.012.

"Rapid formation of stable soil carbonates offers a potential biologically-mediated strategy for removing atmospheric CO2 and forms a part of the negative emissions debate in a bid to maintain global temperatures of 1.5 °C. Microbial respiration in soil and respiration by plant roots leads to high partial pressure of CO2 below ground.Given adequate supply of calcium in soil solution the sequestration of C into the mineral calcite (CaCO3) can occur at rapid rates. We have coupled an established soil C model RothC to a simplified geochemical model so that this strategy can be explored and assessed by simulation."

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14.01.2019

# New Publications

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Caserini, S.; et al. (2019): Affordable CO2 negative emission through hydrogen from biomass, ocean liming, and CO2 storage

Caserini, S.; Barreto, B.; Lanfredi, C.; Cappello, G.; Ross Morrey, D.; Grosso, M. (2019): Affordable CO2 negative emission through hydrogen from biomass, ocean liming, and CO2 storage. In: Mitig Adapt Strat Glob Change 208 (2), S. 1389. DOI: 10.1007/s11027-018-9835-7.

"A new process to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, by combining commercial industrial technologies with ocean liming and CO2 storage, is presented. The process aims to overcome the limiting factors of other negative emission technologies (cost and energy requirements, potential competition for land and freshwater) while simultaneously addressing the problem of ocean acidification."

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