31.05.2019

# New Publications

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Busch, J.; et al. (2019): Potential for low-cost carbon dioxide removal through tropical reforestation

Busch, J.; Engelmann, J.; Cook-Patton, S.; Griscom, B.; Kroeger, T.; Possingham, H.; Shyamsundar, P. (2019): Potential for low-cost carbon dioxide removal through tropical reforestation. In: Nature Climate change 9 (6), S. 463–466. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0485-x.

"Achieving the 1.5–2.0 °C temperature targets of the Paris climate agreement requires not only reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) but also increasing removals of GHGs from the atmosphere. Reforestation is a potentially large-scale method for removing CO2 and storing it in the biomass and soils of ecosystems, yet its cost per tonne remains uncertain. Here, we produce spatially disaggregated marginal abatement cost curves for tropical reforestation by simulating the effects of payments for increased CO2 removals on land-cover change in 90 countries."

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31.05.2019

# New Publications

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Yu, S.; et al. (2019): Plasmonic photosynthesis of C1–C3 hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide assisted by an ionic liquid

Yu, S.; Jain, P. (2019): Plasmonic photosynthesis of C1–C3 hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide assisted by an ionic liquid. In: Nat Comms 10 (1), S. 2022. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-10084-5.

"Photochemical conversion of CO2 into fuels has promise as a strategy for storage of intermittent solar energy in the form of chemical bonds. [...] Here we demonstrate a strategy for green-light-driven synthesis of C1–C3 hydrocarbons from CO2 and H2O. In this approach, plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles produces a charge-rich environment at the nanoparticle/solution interface conducive for CO2 activation, while an ionic liquid stabilizes charged intermediates formed at this interface, facilitating multi-step reduction and C–C coupling."

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31.05.2019

# New Publications

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Vielstädte, L.; et al. (2019): Footprint and detectability of a well leaking CO2 in the Central North Sea. Implications from a field experiment and numerical modelling

Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Haeckel, M.; Braack, M.; Wallmann, K. (2019): Footprint and detectability of a well leaking CO2 in the Central North Sea. Implications from a field experiment and numerical modelling. In: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 84, S. 190–203. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.03.012.

"Existing wells pose a risk for the loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) from storage sites, which might compromise the suitability of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies as climate change mitigation options. Here, we show results of a controlled CO2 release experiment at the Sleipner CO2 storage site and numerical simulations that evaluate the detectability and environmental consequences of a well leaking CO2 into the Central North Sea (CNS)."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Zhang, C.; et al. (2019): Biochar for environmental management. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, contaminant treatment, and potential negative impacts

Zhang, C.; Zeng, G.; Huang, D.; Lai, C.; Chen, M.; Cheng, M. et al. (2019): Biochar for environmental management. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, contaminant treatment, and potential negative impacts. In: Chemical Engineering Journal 373, S. 902–922. DOI: 10.1016/j.cej.2019.05.139.

"This review provides new insights into the state-of-the-art accomplishments in the utilization of biochar in environmental management and covers three perspectives: firstly, mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, such as sequestration of CO2 and CH4 in global carbon pools and mitigation of N2O emissions; secondly, pollution control, including adsorptive removal and reactive removal of inorganic and organic contaminants; thirdly, potential negative aspects of biochar applications, including contaminations originated from biochar, negative alterations to soil properties and soil biota, negative impacts of biochar on GHG emissions and negative impacts of biochar migration."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Ye, Y.; et al. (2019): Dramatic differences in carbon dioxide adsorption and initial steps of reduction between silver and copper

Ye, Y.; Yang, H.; Qian, J.; Su, H.; Lee, K.; Cheng, T. et al. (2019): Dramatic differences in carbon dioxide adsorption and initial steps of reduction between silver and copper. In: Nat Comms 10 (1), S. 1875. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09846-y.

"Converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into liquid fuels and synthesis gas is a world-wide priority. But there is no experimental information on the initial atomic level events for CO2 electroreduction on the metal catalysts to provide the basis for developing improved catalysts. Here we combine ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with quantum mechanics to examine the processes as Ag is exposed to CO2 both alone and in the presence of H2O at 298 K."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Kallenbach, C.; et al. (2019): Managing Agroecosystems for Soil Microbial Carbon Use Efficiency: Ecological Unknowns, Potential Outcomes, and a Path Forward

Kallenbach, C.; Wallenstein, M.; Schipanksi, M.; Grandy, S. (2019): Managing Agroecosystems for Soil Microbial Carbon Use Efficiency: Ecological Unknowns, Potential Outcomes, and a Path Forward. In: Frontiers in Microbiology 10, S. 51. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01146.

"Agricultural systems are increasingly managed for improving soil carbon (C) accumulation. However, there are limits to C returns in agricultural systems that constrain soil C accumulation capacity. [...] In this perspective, we consider three complex drivers of agroecosystem CUE that need to be resolved to develop effective C sequestration management practices in the future: (1) the environment as an individual trait moderator versus a filter, (2) microbial community competitive and faciliatory interactions, and (3) spatiotemporal dynamics through the soil profile and across the microbial lifecycle."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Townsend, A.; et al. (2019): The LCFS and CCS Protocol: An Overview for Policymakers and Project Developers

Townsend, A.; Havercroft, I. (2019): The LCFS and CCS Protocol: An Overview for Policymakers and Project Developers. Hg. v. Global CCS Institute. Online: https://www.globalccsinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/LCFS-and-CCS-Protocol_digital_version.pdf.

"This report provides a summary of the CCS Protocol of the California Low Carbon Fuel Standard (“LCFS”) and how it compares to other significant regulations and policies in the US associated with the injection and geologic sequestration of CO2."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Baskin, J. (2019): Geoengineering, the Anthropocene and the End of Nature

Baskin, J. (2019): Geoengineering, the Anthropocene and the End of Nature. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.

"This book takes a critical look at solar geoengineering as an acceptable means for addressing climate change. Baskin explores the assumptions and imaginaries which animate ‘engineering the climate’ and discusses why this climate solution is so controversial. The book explains geoengineering’s past, its revival in the mid-2000s, and its future prospects including its shadow presence in the Paris climate accord."

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27.05.2019

# New Publications

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Robrecht, S.; et al. (2019): Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer, Atmos

Robrecht, S., Vogel, B., Grooß, J.-U., Rosenlof, K., Thornberry, T., Rollins, A., Krämer, M., Christensen, L., and Müller, R. (2019): Mechanism of ozone loss under enhanced water vapour conditions in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere in summer, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5805-5833, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5805-2019, 2019.
 
"Water vapour convectively injected into the mid-latitude lowermost stratosphere could affect stratospheric ozone. The associated potential ozone loss process requires low temperatures together with elevated water vapour mixing ratios. Since this ozone loss is initiated by heterogeneous chlorine activation on liquid aerosols, an increase in sulfate aerosol surface area due to a volcanic eruption or geoengineering could increase the likelihood of its occurrence. [...] Here, we analyse the ozone loss mechanism and its sensitivity to various stratospheric conditions in detail. By conducting a box-model study with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS), chemistry was simulated along a 7 d backward trajectory."
 

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24.05.2019

# New Publications

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Bluemling, B.; et al. (2019): Seeding the clouds to reach the sky. Will China's weather modification practices support the legitimization of climate engineering?

Bluemling, B.; Kim, R.; Biermann, F. (2019): Seeding the clouds to reach the sky. Will China's weather modification practices support the legitimization of climate engineering? In AMBIO. DOI: 10.1007/s13280-019-01180-3.

"In this Perspective, we discuss whether in times of quickly proceeding global environmental change, radical global interventions like “climate engineering” may gain legitimacy in China and eventually be deployed or supported. We argue that one cornerstone for whether climate engineering, and solar radiation management in particular, could gain legitimacy in China, is its current weather modification programme."

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