11.03.2019

# New Publications

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Wang, X.; et al. (2019): Rechargeable Zn-CO2 Electrochemical Cells Mimicking Two-Step Photosynthesis

Wang, X.; Xie, J.; Ghausi, M.; Lv, Jiangquan; Huang, Y.; Wu, M. et al. (2019): Rechargeable Zn-CO2 Electrochemical Cells Mimicking Two-Step Photosynthesis. In: Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), e1807807. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201807807.

"Metal-CO2 batteries represent a promising priority for sustainable energy and the environment. However, CO2 utilization in nonaqueous electrolytes mostly involves difficult CO2 electrochemistry, leading to poor selectivity and limited cycle performance. "

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10.03.2019

# New Publications

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Wanser, K.; et al. (2019). Ensuring a Safe Climate. A SilverLining Report

Wanser, K.; Konar, M.; Bergeron, L. (2019). Ensuring a Safe Climate. A SilverLining Report. SilverLining. Online available: https://www.silverlining.ngo/ensuringasafeclimatereport.

"This report discusses the near-term risks of climate change; possible techniques that can be used to directly reduce warming in the climate; possible risks, benefits, and costs of these techniques; on overview of governance cosiderations and mechanisms; the nature of research for these techniques; the current state of play; and recommendations for policymakers for exploring these approaches to expand options for ensuring safety."

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10.03.2019

# New Publications

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Biermann, F.; et al. (2019): Rich man’s solution? Climate engineering discourses and the marginalization of the Global South

Biermann, F.; Möller, I. (2019): Rich man’s solution? Climate engineering discourses and the marginalization of the Global South. In: Int Environ Agreements 17 (1), S. 21. DOI: 10.1007/s10784-019-09431-0.

"Numerous recent studies project that ‘climate engineering’ technologies might need to play a major role in the future. Such technologies may carry major risks for developing countries that are often especially vulnerable to, and lack adaptive capacity to deal with, the impacts of such new technologies. [...] The article concludes by sketching options that developing countries may have to influence the agenda on climate engineering, reflecting on earlier attempts to increase control over novel technologies and influence global agenda setting."

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04.03.2019

# New Publications

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Bajamundi, C.; et al. (2019): Capturing CO2 from air. Technical performance and process control improvement

Bajamundi, C.; Koponen, J.; Ruuskanen, V.; Elfving, J.; Kosonen, A.; Kauppinen, J. ; Ahola, J. (2019): Capturing CO2 from air. Technical performance and process control improvement. In: Journal of CO2 Utilization 30, S. 232–239. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcou.2019.02.002.

"Direct air capture (DAC) is a technology for collecting and concentrating carbon dioxide from ambient air. If driven with renewable power, DAC is potentially a negative CO2 emissions technology that can compensate emissions from non-point sources such as aviation, shipping and land-use change. This study presents the results of 10 days capture campaign done between May and July 2018 plus a process control improvement test."

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04.03.2019

# New Publications

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Reynolds, J. (2019): The Governance of Solar Geoengineering: Managing Climate Change in the Anthropocene

Reynolds, J. (2019): The Governance of Solar Geoengineering: Managing Climate Change in the Anthropocene. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

"Climate change is among the world's most important problems, and solutions based on emission cuts or adapting to new climates remain elusive. One set of proposals receiving increasing attention among scientists and policymakers is "solar geoengineering," (also known as solar radiation modification) which would reflect a small portion of incoming sunlight to reduce climate change. Evidence indicates that this could be effective, inexpensive, and technically feasible, but it poses environmental risks and social challenges. Governance will thus be crucial."

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04.03.2019

# New Publications

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Anderson, C.; et al. (2019): Natural climate solutions are not enough

Anderson, C.; DeFries, R.; Litterman, R.; Matson, P.; Nepstad, D.; Pacala, S. et al. (2019): Natural climate solutions are not enough. In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 363 (6430), S. 933–934. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw2741.

"Stabilizing Earth's climate and limiting temperature increase to well below 2°C per the Paris Agreement requires a dramatic uptick in the rate of progress on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. [...] Some of us have contributed to among the most optimistic assessments of the potential of NCS (1), whereas others have been more pessimistic (2, 3). But one thing on which we agree, and which technical literature generally acknowledges, is that the benefits of NCS do not decrease the imperative for mitigation from the energy and industrial sectors (2, 4, 5)."

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25.02.2019

# New Publications

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Goeppert, A.; et al. (2019): Efficient, stable, oxidation resistant and cost effective epoxide modified polyamine adsorbents for CO2 capture from various sources including air

Goeppert, A.; Zhang, H.; Sen, R.; Dang, H.; Prakash, S. (2019): Efficient, stable, oxidation resistant and cost effective epoxide modified polyamine adsorbents for CO2 capture from various sources including air. In: ChemSusChem. DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201802978.

"Carbon dioxide adsorbents based on the reaction of pentaethylenehaxamine (PEHA) or tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) with propylene oxide (PO) were easily prepared in “one pot” by impregnation on a silica support in water. The starting materials are readily available and have a low cost facilitating the production of the adsorbents on a large scale. The prepared polyamine/epoxide adsorbents were efficient in capturing CO2 and regenerable under mild conditions (50‐85 °C)."

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25.02.2019

# New Publications

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Brown, C.; et al. (2019): Achievement of Paris climate goals unlikely due to time lags in the land system

Brown, C.; Alexander, P.; Arneth, A.; Holman, I.; Rounsevell, M. (2019): Achievement of Paris climate goals unlikely due to time lags in the land system. In: Nat. Clim. Chang. 9 (3), S. 203–208. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-019-0400-5.

"These shortcomings are partially the result of avoidable ‘blind spots’ relating to time lags inherent in the implementation of land-based mitigation strategies. Key blind spots include inconsistencies between different land-system policies, spatial and temporal lags in land-system change, and detrimental consequences of some mitigation options. We suggest that improved recognition of these processes is necessary to identify achievable mitigation actions, avoiding excessively optimistic assumptions and consequent policy failures."

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25.02.2019

# New Publications

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Lockley, A.; et al. (2019): Geoengineering and the blockchain: Coordinating Carbon Dioxide Removal and Solar Radiation Management to tackle future emissions

Lockley, A.; Mi, Z.; Coffman, D. (2019): Geoengineering and the blockchain: Coordinating Carbon Dioxide Removal and Solar Radiation Management to tackle future emissions. In: Frontiers of Engineering Management. DOI: 10.1007/s42524-019-0010-y.

"Pairing SRM and CDR offers a contractually complete solution for future emissions if effectively-scaled and coordinated. SRM offsets warming, while CDR takes effect.We suggest coordination using a blockchain, i.e. smart contracts and a distributed ledger. Specifically, we integrate CDR futures with time and volume-matched SRM orders, to address emissions contractually before release."

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25.02.2019

# New Publications

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Lockley, A. (2019): Security of solar radiation management geoengineering

Lockley, A. (2019): Security of solar radiation management geoengineering. In: Frontiers of Engineering Management. DOI: 10.1007/s42524-019-0008-5.

"Solar Radiation Management (SRM) geoengineering is a proposed response to anthropogenic global warming (AGW) (National Academy of Sciences, 2015). There may be profound – even violent – disagreement on preferred temperature. SRM disruption risks dangerous temperature rise (termination shock). Concentrating on aircraft-delivered Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI), we appraise threats to SRM and defense methodologies. Civil protest and minor cyberattacks are almost inevitable but are manageable (unless state-sponsored)."

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