05.08.2019

# New Publications

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Friedmann, J. (2019): Engineered CO2 Removal, Climate Restoration, and Humility

Friedmann, J. (2019): Engineered CO2 Removal, Climate Restoration, and Humility. In: Front. Clim. 1, S. 247. DOI: 10.3389/fclim.2019.00003.

"Over the past 200 years, humans have dramatically altered our global environmental envelope accidentally through uncontrolled greenhouse gas emissions. Humans have also developed the technology to both stop emitting greenhouse gases and ultimately to remove them from the atmosphere through a combination of natural and engineered pathways."

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29.07.2019

# New Publications

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Reynolds, J.; et al. (2019): Highly decentralized solar geoengineering

Reynolds, J.; Wagner, G. (2019): Highly decentralized solar geoengineering. In: Environmental Politics 4 (3), S. 1–17. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2019.1648169.

"Nonstate actors appear to have increasing power, in part due to new technologies that alter actors’ capacities and incentives. Although solar geoengineering is typically conceived of as centralized and state-deployed, we explore highly decentralized solar geoengineering. Done perhaps through numerous small high-altitude balloons, it could be provided by nonstate actors such as environmentally motivated nongovernmental organizations or individuals."

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29.07.2019

# New Publications

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Stilgoe, J. (2019): Shared space and slow science in geoengineering research

Stilgoe, J. (2019): Shared space and slow science in geoengineering research. In: René von Schomberg und Jonathan Hankins (Eds.): International handbook on responsible innovation. A global resource. Cheltenham, UK, Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, p. 259–270.

"In this chapter, I use the idea of shared space as an analogy for the responsible governance of a controversial emerging area of science: geoengineering. I begin by sketching a conventional history of geoengineering ideas, before complicating this narrative to suggest that the conventional distribution of responsibility between climate understanding and climate control cannot be drawn as easily, as is often assumed. I then consider the contested nature of geoengineering experiments as a site for the negotiation of responsibility."

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29.07.2019

# New Publications

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Gruber, S.; et al. (2019): A Process Study on Thinning of Arctic Winter Cirrus Clouds With High‐Resolution ICON‐ART Simulations

Gruber, S.; Blahak, U.; Haenel, F.; Kottmeier, C.; Leisner, T.; Muskatel, H. et al. (2019): A Process Study on Thinning of Arctic Winter Cirrus Clouds With High‐Resolution ICON‐ART Simulations. In: J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 498 (21), S. 339. DOI: 10.1029/2018JD029815.

"In this study, cloud‐resolving simulations of a case study for a limited area of the hibernal Arctic were performed with the atmospheric modeling system ICON‐ART (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic‐Aerosol and Reactive Trace gases). A thorough comparison with data both from satellite as well as aircraft measurement is presented to validate the simulations. In addition, the model is applied to clarify the microphysical processes occurring when introducing artificial aerosol particles into the upper troposphere with the aim of modifying cirrus clouds in the framework of climate engineering."

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29.07.2019

# New Publications

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Helwegen, K.; et al. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by solar radiation management might strongly enhance future welfare

Helwegen, K.; Wieners, C.; Frank, J.; Dijkstra, H. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by solar radiation management might strongly enhance future welfare. In: Earth Syst. Dynam. 10 (3), S. 453–472. DOI: 10.5194/esd-10-453-2019.

"Solar radiation management (SRM) has been proposed as a means to reduce global warming in spite of high greenhouse-gas concentrations and to lower the chance of warming-induced tipping points. However, SRM may cause economic damages and its feasibility is still uncertain. To investigate the trade-off between these (economic) gains and damages, we incorporate SRM into a stochastic dynamic integrated assessment model and perform the first rigorous cost–benefit analysis of sulfate-based SRM under uncertainty, treating warming-induced climate tipping and SRM failure as stochastic elements."

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29.07.2019

# New Publications

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Colvin, R.; et al. (2019): Learning from the Climate Change Debate to Avoid Polarisation on Negative Emissions

Colvin, R.; Kemp, L.; Talberg, A.; Castella, C. de; Downie, C.; Friel, S. et al. (2019): Learning from the Climate Change Debate to Avoid Polarisation on Negative Emissions. In: Environmental Communication 28, S. 1–13. DOI: 10.1080/17524032.2019.1630463.

"This paper identifies critical lessons from the climate change experience to guide how communications and engagement on negative emissions can be conducted to encourage functional public and policy discourse. Negative emissions technologies present a significant opportunity for limiting climate change, and are likely to be necessary to keep warming below 2°C."

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25.07.2019

# New Publications

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Jinnah, S.; et al. (2019): Governing Climate Engineering: A Proposal for Immediate Governance of Solar Radiation Management

Jinnah, S.; Nicholson, S.; Morrow, D.; Dove, Z.; Wapner, P.; Valdivia, W. et al. (2019): Governing Climate Engineering: A Proposal for Immediate Governance of Solar Radiation Management. In: Sustainability 11 (14), S. 3954. DOI: 10.3390/su11143954.

"Solar radiation management (SRM) technologies would reflect a small amount of incoming solar radiation back into space before the radiation can warm the planet. Although SRM may emerge as a useful component of a global response to climate change, there is also good reason for caution."

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25.07.2019

# New Publications

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Stenzel, F.; et al. (2019): Freshwater requirements of large-scale bioenergy plantations for limiting global warming to 1.5 °C

Stenzel, F.; Gerten, D.; Werner, C.; Jägermeyr, J. (2019): Freshwater requirements of large-scale bioenergy plantations for limiting global warming to 1.5 °C. In: Environ. Res. Lett. 14 (8), S. 84001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/ab2b4b.

"This paper provides a first-order quantification of the biophysical potentials of BECCS as a negative emission technology contribution to reaching the 1.5 °C warming target, as constrained by associated water availabilities and requirements. Using a global biosphere model, we analyze the availability of freshwater for irrigation of BPs designed to meet the projected NEs to fulfill the 1.5 °C target, spatially explicitly on areas not reserved for ecosystem conservation or agriculture."

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22.07.2019

# New Publications

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Realmonte, G.; et al. (2019): An inter-model assessment of the role of direct air capture in deep mitigation pathways

Realmonte, G.; Drouet, L.; Gambhir, A.; Glynn, J.; Hawkes, A.; Köberle, A.; Tavoni, M. (2019): An inter-model assessment of the role of direct air capture in deep mitigation pathways. In: Nat Comms 10 (1), S. 3277. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-10842-5.

"The feasibility of large-scale biological CO2 removal to achieve stringent climate targets remains unclear. Direct Air Carbon Capture and Storage (DACCS) offers an alternative negative emissions technology (NET) option. Here we conduct the first inter-model comparison on the role of DACCS in 1.5 and 2 °C scenarios, under a variety of techno-economic assumptions."

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22.07.2019

# New Publications

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Feldmann, J.; et al. (2019): Stabilizing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet by surface mass deposition

Feldmann, J.; Levermann, A.; Mengel, M. (2019): Stabilizing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet by surface mass deposition. In: Science Advances 5 (7), eaaw4132. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw4132.

"There is evidence that a self-sustaining ice discharge from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has started, potentially leading to its disintegration. The associated sea level rise of more than 3m would pose a serious challenge to highly populated areas including metropolises such as Calcutta, Shanghai, New York City, and Tokyo. Here, we show that the WAIS may be stabilized through mass deposition in coastal regions around Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers."

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