01.05.2011

# New Publications

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Burns, William C. G. (2011): Climate Geoengineering: Solar Radiation Management and its Implications for Intergenerational Equity

Burns, William C. G. (2011): Climate Geoengineering: Solar Radiation Management and its Implications for Intergenerational Equity. In: Stanford Journal of Law, Science & Policy 4 (May 10), pp. 39–55.

"This article examines the implications of Solar Radiation Management climate geoengineering for intergenerational equity. It argues that under all but the most stringent circumstances, solar radiation management approaches would violate the internationally legally recognized principle of intergenerational equity."

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01.05.2011

# New Publications

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Humphreys, D. (2011), ‘Smoke and Mirrors: Some Reflections on the Science and Politics of Geoengineering’

Humphreys, D. (2011), ‘Smoke and Mirrors: Some Reflections on the Science and Politics of Geoengineering’, The Journal of Environment & Development, 20/2: 99–120.

"This article identifies and explores some of the political issues that will need to be addressed in the governance of geoengineering. It is argued that the diversity of different possible geoengineering techniques—encompassing solar radiation management (SRM) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), and further divided into territorial techniques and commons-based techniques—rules out a single mode of geoengineering governance. Whereas some geoengineering techniques may be effective when implemented by a small number of countries, others would need to be implemented around the globe and involve most countries of the world, with different countries having different comparative advantages in the various geoengineering techniques. Such an enterprise would generate collective action problems related to implementation and disagreements over who should pay for the financial and nonfinancial costs of geoengineering. Nonetheless, a more coherent system of geoengineering governance is possible and is necessary if international conflict is to be avoided and the risks of unintended consequences are to be minimized. Any new international institutional design on geoengineering will need to address some pressing political and scientific questions, including the desired mean temperature of the world’s climate, the possible role of CDR technologies in carbon offsets and emissions-trading schemes, and whether there should be differentiated obligations between different groups of states."


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01.05.2011

# New Publications

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Guo, Dongfang; Thee, Hendy; et al. (2011): Borate-Catalyzed Carbon Dioxide Hydration via the Carbonic Anhydrase Mechanism

Guo, Dongfang; Thee, Hendy; da Silva, Gabriel; Chen, Jian; Fei, Weiyang; Kentish, Sandra; Stevens, Geoffrey W. (2011): Borate-Catalyzed Carbon Dioxide Hydration via the Carbonic Anhydrase Mechanism. In: Environ. Sci. Technol 45 (11), S. 4802–4807. DOI: 10.1021/es200590m

"The hydration of CO(2) plays a critical role in carbon capture and geoengineering technologies currently under development to mitigate anthropogenic global warming and in environmental processes such as ocean acidification. [...]"


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15.04.2011

# New Publications

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Hommel, René; Graf, Hans-F (2011): Modelling the size distribution of geoengineered stratospheric aerosols

Hommel, René; Graf, Hans-F (2011): Modelling the size distribution of geoengineered stratospheric aerosols. In: Atmosph. Sci. Lett 12 (2), S. 168–175. DOI: 10.1002/asl.285

"A modelling study on the growth of geoengineered stratospheric aerosols reveals that in steady state a large fraction of aerosols grow to micrometre sizes so that the sedimentation of aerosols might limit the geoengineered aerosol layer's ability to achieve its target cooling effect."


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15.04.2011

# New Publications

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Joseph, Renu; Zeng, Ning (2011): Seasonally Modulated Tropical Drought Induced by Volcanic Aerosol

Joseph, Renu; Zeng, Ning (2011): Seasonally Modulated Tropical Drought Induced by Volcanic Aerosol. In: J. Climate 24 (8), S. 2045–2060. DOI: 10.1175/2009JCLI3170.1

"Major volcanic events with a high loading of stratospheric aerosol have long been known to cause cooling, but their impact on precipitation has only recently been emphasized, especially as an analog for potential geoengineering of climate. [...]"


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01.04.2011

# New Publications

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Carlin, A. (2011), ‘A Multidisciplinary, Science-Based Approach to the Economics of Climate Change’

Carlin, A. (2011), ‘A Multidisciplinary, Science-Based Approach to the Economics of Climate Change’, IJERPH, 8/4: 985–1031.

"Economic analyses of environmental mitigation and other interdisciplinary public policy issues can be much more useful if they critically examine what other disciplines have to say, insist on using the most relevant observational data and the scientific method, and examine lower cost alternatives to the change proposed. These general principles are illustrated by applying them to the case of climate change mitigation, one of the most interdisciplinary of public policy issues. [...] The risk of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming appears to be so low that it is not currently worth doing anything to try to control it, including geoengineering."


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01.04.2011

# New Publications

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Goes, M., Keller, K., and Tuana, N. (2011), ‘The economics (or lack thereof) of aerosol geoengineering’

Goes, Marlos; Tuana, Nancy; Keller, Klaus (2011): The economics (or lack thereof) of aerosol geoengineering. In: Climatic Change 109 (3-4), pp. 719–744.

"Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the Earth’s climate and impose substantial risks for current and future generations. What are scientifically sound, economically viable, and ethically defendable strategies to manage these climate risks? Ratified international agreements call for a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Recent proposals, however, call for a different approach: to geoengineer climate by injecting aerosol precursors into the stratosphere. [...]"

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01.04.2011

# New Publications

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Horton, J. B. (2011), ‘Geoengineering and the Myth of Unilateralism

Horton, J. B. (2011), ‘Geoengineering and the Myth of Unilateralism: Pressures and Prospects for International Cooperation’, Stanford Journal of Law, Science & Policy, IV: 56–69.

"In this article, I argue that fear of unilateralism is largely misplaced, grounded more in unexamined policy assumptions than in reasoned analysis of the strategic situation faced by states. I will present this argument in five parts. First, I will document the widespread notion that unilateral geoengineering poses a genuine threat to the international order. Second, I will closely examine the interests and constraints that are likely to confront states contemplating intervention in the climate system. Third, I will demonstrate that international dynamics are
more likely to create pressures leading to cooperation than to foster tendencies toward unilateralism. Fourth, I will consider different mechanisms for encouraging collaboration on climate intervention strategies. Finally, I will consider the implications of this argument for future discussions of geoengineering."


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24.02.2011

# New Publications

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Betz, G., and Cacean, S. (2011), ‘The moral controversy about Climate Engineering. an argument map’

Betz, G., and Cacean, S. (2011), ‘The moral controversy about Climate Engineering. an argument map’, Version 2011-02-24 <http://digbib.ubka.uni-karlsruhe.de/volltexte/1000022371>, updated 24 Feb 2011, accessed 4 Jul 2011.

Flow chart of arguments in the discours on Climate Engineering.


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04.02.2011

# New Publications

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Hester, Tracy (2011): Remaking the World to Save it

Hester, Tracy (2011): Remaking the World to Save it: Applying U.S. Environmental Laws to Climate Engineering Projects (February 4, 2011). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1755203

Paper on legal regulation according to U.S. laws.

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