15.04.2019

# New Publications

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Asayama, S.; et al. (2019): Beyond solutionist science for the Anthropocene: To navigate the contentious atmosphere of solar geoengineering

Asayama, S.; Sugiyama, M.; Ishii, A.; Kosugi, T. (2019): Beyond solutionist science for the Anthropocene: To navigate the contentious atmosphere of solar geoengineering. In: The Anthropocene Review 33 (3), 205301961984367. DOI: 10.1177/2053019619843678.

"This paper explores this close yet precarious relationship between transdisciplinary GEC science and solar geoengineering in the context of Future Earth, a new international platform of Earth system science. Our aim is to understand how a transdisciplinary mode of science can navigate the contention over solar geoengineering and its course of research without breeding polarization. By seeking the immediacy of ‘problem-solving’, Future Earth is drawn into the solutionist thinking that orders the mode of engagement in pursuing consensus."

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15.04.2019

# New Publications

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Piotrowski, M.; et al. (2019): Technological Carbon Report. Recent Economic and Political Trends in the United States. April 2019

Piotrowski, M.; Taraksa, G.; Langley, C. (2019): Technological Carbon Report. Recent Economic and Political Trends in the United States. April 2019. Climate Advisers. Online: https://www.climateadvisers.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Carbon-Removal-Final-2.pdf.

"In this report,we assessthe current state of affairssurroundingtechnological carbon dioxide removal (CDR)—sometimes referred to as “engineered” CDR or negative emissions technologies (NETs)—in the United States. After defining what technologicalCDR is and why it matters, we examine the status of technological CDR in the U.S. economy—looking carefully at what companies and investors are doing currently. We then review the policy and political landscape for technologicalCDR before providing concrete policy recommendations for action at the Federal level."

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08.04.2019

# New Publications

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Pires, J. (2019): Negative emissions technologies: A complementary solution for climate change mitigation

Pires, J. (2019): Negative emissions technologies: A complementary solution for climate change mitigation. In: Science of the Total Environment 672, S. 502–514. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.004.

"Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the main greenhouse gas (GHG) and its atmospheric concentration is currently 50% higher than pre-industrial levels. The continuous GHGs emissions may lead to severe and irreversible consequences in the climate system. [...] This paper aims to present the recent research works regarding NETs, focusing the research findings achieved by academic groups and projects."

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08.04.2019

# New Publications

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Lewis, S.; et al. (2019): Restoring natural forests is the best way to remove atmospheric carbon

Lewis, S.; Wheeler, C.; Mitchard, E.; Koch, A. (2019): Restoring natural forests is the best way to remove atmospheric carbon. In: Nature 568 (7750), S. 25–28. DOI: 10.1038/d41586-019-01026-8.

"To stem global warming, deforestation must stop. And restoration programmes worldwide should return all degraded lands to natural forests — and protect them. More carbon must be stored on land, while recognizing competing pressures to deliver food, fuel, fodder and fibre."

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08.04.2019

# New Publications

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Bipartisan Policy Center (2019): Carbon Removal: Comparing Historical Federal Research Investments with the National Academies’ Recommended Future Funding Levels

Bipartisan Policy Center (2019): Carbon Removal: Comparing Historical Federal Research Investments with the National Academies’ Recommended Future Funding Levels. Online: https://bipartisanpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Carbon-Removal-Comparing-Historical-Investments-with-the-National-Academies-Recommendations.pdf

"The objective of this analysis is to review the historical baseline estimates of cumulative federal RD&D investment related to carbon removal and assess how they compare with the recommended future funding levels from the 2018 NASEM report."

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08.04.2019

# New Publications

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McDonald, J.; et al. (2019): Governing geoengineering research for the Great Barrier Reef

McDonald, J.; McGee, J.; Brent, K.; Burns, W. (2019): Governing geoengineering research for the Great Barrier Reef. In: Climate Policy 92 (10), S. 1–11. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2019.1592742.

"Coral reefs are highly vulnerable to the impacts of rising marine temperatures and marine heatwaves. Mitigating dangerous climate change is essential and urgent, but many reef systems are already suffering on current levels of warming. Geoengineering options are worth exploring to protect the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from extreme warming conditions, but we contend that they require strong governance and public consultation from the outset."

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01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Jinnah, S.; et al. (2019): Introduction to the Symposium on ‘Geoengineering. Governing Solar Radiation Management

Jinnah, S.; Nicholson, S. (2019): Introduction to the Symposium on ‘Geoengineering. Governing Solar Radiation Management'. In: Environmental Politics 28 (3), S. 385–396. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2019.1558515.

"The term solar radiation management (SRM) describes a set of speculative technologies that might help humanity respond to climate change. SRM technologies would operate, if ever developed and deployed at scale, by reflecting a small amount of solar energy back into space before that energy warms the planet."

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01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Zhan, P.; et a. (2019): Impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China

Zhan, P.; Zhu, W.; Zhang, T.; Cui, X.; Li, N. (2019): Impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China. Results from a multi‐model ensemble. In: Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1029/2018EF001094.

"In this study, we simulated the impacts of sulfate geoengineering on rice yield in China both with sufficient irrigation (irrigated) and without irrigation (rainfed). We used Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4 climates from 6 climate models to force the ORYZA version 3 crop model to simulate rice yields under sulfate geoengineering scenario."

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01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Bal, P.; et al. (2019): Effects of global warming and solar geoengineering on precipitation seasonality

Bal, P.; Pathak, R.; Mishra, S.; Sahany, S. (2019): Effects of global warming and solar geoengineering on precipitation seasonality. In: Environ. Res. Lett. 14 (3), S. 34011. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aafc7d.

"The effects of global warming and geoengineering on annual precipitation and its seasonality over different parts of the world are examined using the piControl, 4xCO2 and G1 simulations from eight global climate models participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. Specifically, we have used relative entropy, seasonality index, duration of the peak rainy season and timing of the peak rainy season to investigate changes in precipitation characteristics under 4xCO2 and G1 scenarios with reference to the piControl."

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01.04.2019

# New Publications

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Raimi, K.; et al. (2019): Framing of Geoengineering Affects Support for Climate Change Mitigation

Raimi, K.; Maki, A.; Dana, D.; Vandenbergh, M. (2019): Framing of Geoengineering Affects Support for Climate Change Mitigation. In: Environmental Communication 13 (3), S. 300–319. DOI: 10.1080/17524032.2019.1575258.

"The growing recognition that climate change mitigation alone will be inadequate has led scientists and policymakers to discuss climate geoengineering. An experiment with a US sample found, contrary to previous research, that reading about geoengineering did not reduce conservatives’ skepticism about the existence of anthropogenic climate change. Moreover, depending on how it is framed, geoengineering can reduce support for mitigation among both conservatives and non-conservatives."

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