17.10.2018

# New Publications

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Rabitz, Florian (2018): Governing the termination problem in solar radiation management

Rabitz, Florian (2018): Governing the termination problem in solar radiation management. In: Environmental Politics 22, S. 1–21. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1519879.

"Technologies for Solar Radiation Management (SRM) could limit global warming by manipulating the Earth’s radiation balance. A major objection to SRM is the termination problem: the catastrophic consequences that are likely to result from its sudden discontinuation. The termination problem limits the reversibility of policy choices and poses the risk of inadvertent or enforced program collapse."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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Yu, Q. (2018): Direct capture of CO2 from ambient air using solid sorbents

Yu, Q. (2018): Direct capture of CO2 from ambient air using solid sorbents. Enschede: University of Twente. DOI:10.3990/1.9789036546300

"In this thesis, a novel process is developed and experimentally demonstrated, for CO2 capture from ambient air to produce CO2 enriched air to enhance microalgae cultivation. First, an amine functionalized sorbent is selected, initially based on its water and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity. Subsequently, the selected sorbent is characterized on its stability under different conditions for a wide range."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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Stephenson, S.; et al. (2018): Climatic Responses to Future Trans-Arctic Shipping

Stephenson, S.; Wang, W.; Zender, C.; Wang, H.; Davis, S.; Rasch, P. (2018): Climatic Responses to Future Trans-Arctic Shipping. In: Geophys. Res. Lett. 75 (2), S. 300. DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078969.

"Here we investigate impacts of shipping emissions on Arctic climate using a fully coupled Earth system model (CESM 1.2.2) and a suite of newly developed projections of 21st‐century trans‐Arctic shipping emissions. We find that trans‐Arctic shipping will reduce Arctic warming by nearly 1 °C by 2099, due to sulfate‐driven liquid water cloud formation. Cloud fraction and liquid water path exhibit significant positive trends, cooling the lower atmosphere and surface."

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15.10.2018

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D. G.; et al. (2019): The Engineering of Climate Engineering

MacMartin, D. G.; Kravitz, B. (2019): The Engineering of Climate Engineering. In: Annu. Rev. Control Robot. Auton. Syst. 2 (1). DOI: 10.1146/annurev-control-053018-023725.

"While reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions remains the most essential element of any strategy to manage climate change risk, it is also in principle possible to directly cool the climate by reflecting some sunlight back to space. Such climate engineering approaches include adding aerosols to the stratosphere and marine cloud brightening. Assessing whether these ideas could reduce risk requires a broad, multidisciplinary research effort spanning climate science, social sciences, and governance."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Hourdequin, M. (2018): Geoengineering Justice

Hourdequin, M. (2018): Geoengineering Justice. In: Science, Technology & Human Values 26 (6), 016224391880289. DOI: 10.1177/0162243918802893.

"Global-scale solar geoengineering raises critical ethical questions, including questions of distributive, procedural, and intergenerational justice. Although geoengineering is sometimes framed as a response to injustice, insofar as it might benefit those most vulnerable to climate-related harms, geoengineering also has the potential to exacerbate climate injustice, especially if control of research, governance, and potential plans for deployment remains concentrated in the hands of a few. The scope and scale of solar geoengineering, the diverse concerns it raises, and the lack of consensus surrounding it pose particular challenges for justice."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Kovenock, M.; et al. (2018): Leaf Trait Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide

Kovenock, M.; Swann, A. (2018): Leaf Trait Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide. In: Global Biogeochem. Cycles 165 (2), S. 351. DOI: 10.1029/2018GB005883.

"Here we show that one leaf trait acclimation in response to elevated carbon dioxide—a one‐third increase in leaf mass per area—significantly impacts climate and carbon cycling in Earth system model experiments. Global net primary productivity decreases (−5.8 PgC/year, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] −5.5 to −6.0), representing a decreased carbon dioxide sink of similar magnitude to current annual fossil fuel emissions (8 PgC/year)."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Yao, J.; et al. (2018): Modeling the effects of land-use optimization on the soil organic carbon sequestration potential

Yao, J.; Kong, X. (2018): Modeling the effects of land-use optimization on the soil organic carbon sequestration potential. In: J. Geogr. Sci. 28 (11), S. 1641–1658. DOI: 10.1007/s11442-018-1534-5.

"This research provides evidence to guide planning authorities in conducting land-use optimization strategies and estimating their effects on the carbon sequestration function of land-use systems."

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08.10.2018

# New Publications

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Gattuso, J.; et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems

Gattuso, J.; Magnan, A.; Bopp, L.; Cheung, W.; Duarte, C.; Hinkel, J. et al. (2018): Ocean Solutions to Address Climate Change and Its Effects on Marine Ecosystems. In: Front. Mar. Sci. 5, S. 3. DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00337.

"A comprehensive and systematic assessment of 13 global- and local-scale, ocean-based measures was performed to help steer the development and implementation of technologies and actions toward a sustainable outcome. We show that (1) all measures have tradeoffs and multiple criteria must be used for a comprehensive assessment of their potential, (2) greatest benefit is derived by combining global and local solutions, some of which could be implemented or scaled-up immediately, (3) some measures are too uncertain to be recommended yet, (4) political consistency must be achieved through effective cross-scale governance mechanisms, (5) scientific effort must focus on effectiveness, co-benefits, disbenefits, and costs of poorly tested as well as new and emerging measures."

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03.10.2018

# New Publications

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Chhetri, N.; et al. (2018): Governing Solar Radiation Management

Chhetri, N.; Chong, D.; Conca, K.; Falk, R.; Gillespie, A.; Gupta, A.; et al. (2018): Governing Solar Radiation Management. DOI:10.17606/M6SM17

"This report offers a detailed examination, by a team of global governance experts, of governance needs and options for Solar Radiation Management (SRM) technologies. The report focuses on near-term governance, outlining feasible and needed actions that can be taken by approximately 2025, at the national, regional, and international levels and by non-state actors."

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30.09.2018

# New Publications

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Dietz, S.; et al. (2018): The Economics of 1.5°C Climate Change

Dietz, S.; Bowen, A.; Doda, B.; Gambhir, A.; Warren, R. (2018): The Economics of 1.5°C Climate Change. In: Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 43 (1). DOI: 10.1146/annurev-environ-102017-025817.

"Setting off with higher emissions will make 1.5°C unattainable quickly without recourse to expensive large-scale carbon dioxide removal (CDR), or solar radiation management (SRM), which can be cheap but poses ambiguous risks society seems unwilling to take. Carbon pricing could reduce mitigation costs substantially compared with ramping up the current patchwork of regulatory instruments. Nonetheless, a mix of policies is justified and technology-specific approaches may be required. It is particularly important to step up mitigation finance to developing countries, where emissions abatement is relatively cheap."

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