11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Sujan, A.; et al. (2019): Direct CO2 capture from air using poly(ethyleneimine)-loaded polymer/silica fiber sorbents

Sujan, A.; Pang, S.; Zhu, G.; Jones, C.; Lively, R. (2019): Direct CO2 capture from air using poly(ethyleneimine)-loaded polymer/silica fiber sorbents. In: ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b06203.

"Direct CO2 capture from atmospheric air is gaining increased attention as one of the most scalable negative carbon approaches available to tackle climate change if coupled with the sequestration of CO2 geologically. [...] In this work, we describe the application of polymer/silica fiber sorbents functionalized with a primary amine rich polymer, poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI), for DAC. Monolithic fiber sorbents composed of cellulose acetate (CA) and SiO2 are synthesized via the dry-jet, wet quench spinning technique."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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MacMartin, D.; et al. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering

MacMartin, D.; Wang, W.; Kravitz, B.; Tilmes, S.; Richter, J.; Mills, M. (2019): Timescale for Detecting the Climate Response to Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering. In: J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 41 (3), S. 1738. DOI: 10.1029/2018JD028906.

"Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering could be used to maintain global mean temperature despite increased atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, for example, to meet a 1.5 or 2 °C target. While this might reduce many climate change impacts, the resulting climate would not be the same as one with the same global mean temperature due to lower GHG concentrations. The primary question we consider is how long it would take to detect these differences in a hypothetical deployment. We use a 20‐member ensemble of stratospheric sulfate aerosol geoengineering simulations in which SO2 is injected at four different latitudes to maintain not just the global mean temperature, but also the interhemispheric and equator‐to‐pole gradients."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Svoboda, T.; et al. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice

Svoboda, T.; Irvine, P.; Callies, D.; Sugiyama, M. (2019): The potential for climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to reduce climate injustice. In: Journal of Global Ethics 15 (16), S. 1–16. DOI: 10.1080/17449626.2018.1552180.

"Climate engineering with stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections (SSAI) has the potential to reduce risks of injustice related to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Relying on evidence from modeling studies, this paper makes the case that SSAI could have the potential to reduce many of the key physical risks of climate change identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Such risks carry potential injustice because they are often imposed on low-emitters who do not benefit from climate change."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Dagon, K.; et al. (2019): Quantifying the effects of solar geoengineering on vegetation

Dagon, K.; Schrag, D. (2019): Quantifying the effects of solar geoengineering on vegetation. In: Climatic Change 13 (5), S. 776. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-019-02387-9.

"Solar geoengineering has potential to reduce the climate effects of greenhouse gas emissions through albedo modification, yet more research is needed to better understand how these techniques might impact terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we utilize the fully coupled version of the Community Earth System Model to run transient solar geoengineering simulations designed to stabilize radiative forcing starting mid-century, relative to the Representative Concentration Pathway 6 (RCP6) scenario."

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11.02.2019

# New Publications

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Sato, Y.; et al. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness?

Sato, Y.; Suzuki, K. (2019): How do aerosols affect cloudiness? In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 363 (6427), S. 580–581. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw3720.

"Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere that originate from sources such as agricultural waste, forest fires, sea spray (see the photo), desert dust, and industrial pollution. They alter the energy balance of Earth's climate system through direct reflection and absorption of solar radiation as well as through modulating cloud properties by serving as nuclei for cloud particles."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Williams, N.; et al. (2019): CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers

Williams, N.; Seipp, C.; Brethomé, F.; Ma, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Bryantsev, V. et al. (2019): CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers. In: Chem. DOI: 10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025.

"Human activities in the last one and a half centuries have perturbed the natural carbon cycle, shifting massive amounts of carbon from the geosphere into the atmosphere and leading to climate change at an unprecedented pace. [...] Here, we demonstrate a promising approach to CO2 capture based on crystallization of bicarbonate-water clusters with a simple guanidine compound. The CO2 separation cycle involves a unique proton-transfer mechanism via the formation of a carbonic acid dimer, leading to efficient CO2 release and quantitative regeneration of the guanidine compound and requiring significantly less energy than state-of-the-art carbon-capture technologies."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Adánez-Rubio, I.; et al. (2019): Chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling. An advanced biomass combustion technology to avoid CO2 emissions

Adánez-Rubio, I.; Pérez-Astray, A.; Abad, A.; Gayán, P.; Diego, L. de; Adánez, J. (2019): Chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling. An advanced biomass combustion technology to avoid CO2 emissions. In: Mitig Adapt Strat Glob Change 6, S. 189. DOI: 10.1007/s11027-019-9840-5.

"Bioenergy with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (BECCS) technologies represent an interesting option to reach negative carbon emissions, which implies the removal of CO2 already emitted to the atmosphere. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) with biomass can be considered as a promising BECCS technology since CLC has low cost and energy penalty. In CLC, the oxygen needed for combustion is supplied by a solid oxygen carrier circulating between the fuel and air reactors."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Whyte, Kyle Powys (2019): Indigeneity in Geoengineering Discourses

Whyte, Kyle Powys (2019): Indigeneity in Geoengineering Discourses. Some Considerations. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 20 (2), S. 1–19. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562529.

"Indigenous peoples are referenced at various times in communication, debates, and academic and policy discussions on geoengineering (i.e. geoengineering discourses). The discourses I have in mind focus on ethical and justice issues pertaining to some geoengineering research and (potential) implementation. The issues include concerns about potential inequalities in the distribution of environmental risks, research ethics, and abuses of social power."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Helwegen, K.; et al. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by Geoengineering might strongly enhance future welfare

Helwegen, K.; Wieners, C.; Frank, J.; Dijkstra, H. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by Geoengineering might strongly enhance future welfare. In: Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss., S. 1–24. DOI: 10.5194/esd-2019-5.

"We find that SRM has the potential to greatly enhance future welfare and should therefore be taken seriously as a policy option. However, if only SRM and no CO2 abatement is used, global warming is not stabilised and will exceed 2K. Therefore, even if successful, SRM cannot replace but only complement CO2 abatement. The optimal policy combines CO2 abatement and modest SRM and succeeds in keeping global warming below 2K."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Miocic, J.; et al. (2019): 420,000 year assessment of fault leakage rates shows geological carbon storage is secure

Miocic, J.; Gilfillan, S.; Frank, N.; Schroeder-Ritzrau, A.; Burnside, N.; Haszeldine, S. (2019): 420,000 year assessment of fault leakage rates shows geological carbon storage is secure. In: Scientific reports 9 (1), S. 769. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-36974-0.

"Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology is routinely cited as a cost effective tool for climate change mitigation. CCS can directly reduce industrial CO2 emissions and is essential for the retention of CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. To be effective as a climate change mitigation tool, CO2 must be securely retained for 10,000 years (10 ka) with a leakage rate of below 0.01% per year of the total amount of CO2 injected. Migration of CO2 back to the atmosphere via leakage through geological faults is a potential high impact risk to CO2 storage integrity."

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