25.02.2019

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EASAC: Forest bioenergy, carbon capture and storage, and carbon dioxide removal: an update

"As global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) continue to exceed levels compatible with achieving Paris Agreement targets, attention has been focusing on the role of bioenergy as a ‘renewable’ energy source and its potential for removing CO2 from the atmosphere when associated with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The European Academies’ Science Advisory Council (EASAC) examined these issues in 2017/18, but since then many peer-reviewed papers and international reviews have been published. EASAC has thus revisited these important issues and updates its earlier findings in this commentary."

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25.02.2019

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Chatham House: Rethinking the Governance of Solar Geoengineering

"With scientists portending the possible extinction of species, increased extreme weather conditions and the decline of agricultural productivity across swaths of the globe, governments and scientists are under increasing pressure to explore new technologies that might mitigate the risks of climate change. One such development is solar geoengineering which seeks to lower the Earth’s temperatures by reflecting sunlight back into space or allowing more infrared radiation to escape."

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25.02.2019

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Junge Welt: Tuning the climate (German)

German article on CE

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20.02.2019

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Solarify: "Geoengineering dangerous fallcy" (German)

German article on CE

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19.02.2019

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Financial Times: Researchers plan to enlist ocean viruses in climate change fight

"The trillions of marine viruses that inhabit the world’s oceans could be mobilised in the fight against climate change. New studies suggest that manipulating the viruses that infect most of the bacteria in the oceans enables the microbes to absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which could be employed to tackle global warming."

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18.02.2019

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University of Cambridge: Lecture Series 2019: Climate Repair

"Sir David King, the UK Government's former Chief Scientific Advisor, has called for a high carbon price to be implemented globally. He calls on the UK Government to increase ambition for a net-zero emissions policy by 2045 and to start to repair the climate system."

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18.02.2019

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The Conversation: Carbon capture on power stations burning woodchips is not the green gamechanger many think it is

"The UK’s efforts to develop facilities to remove carbon emissions from power stations took a step forward with news of a demonstrator project getting underway at the Drax plant in north Yorkshire. Where most electricity carbon capture projects have focused on coal-fired power, the Drax project is the first to capture carbon dioxide (CO₂) from a plant purely burning wood chips – or biomass, to use the industry jargon."

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18.02.2019

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Foreign Affairs: Less Than Zero

"Most Americans used to think about climate change—to the extent that they thought about it at all—as an abstract threat in a distant future. But more and more are now seeing it for what it is: a costly, human-made disaster unfolding before their very eyes."

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18.02.2019

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ScienceDaily: Carbon dioxide sequestration accompanied by bioenergy generation using a bubbling-type photosynthetic algae microbial fuel cell

"Researchers have proposed a design solution that could bring artificial leaves out of the lab and into the environment. Their improved leaf, which would use carbon dioxide -- a potent greenhouse gas -- from the air, would be at least 10 times more efficient than natural leaves at converting carbon dioxide to fuel."

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18.02.2019

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The New York Times Magazine: The Tiny Swiss Company That Thinks It Can Help Stop Climate Change

"[...] These were “direct air capture” machines, which soon would begin collecting carbon dioxide from air drawn in through their central ducts. Once trapped, the CO₂ would then be siphoned into large tanks and trucked to a local Coca-Cola bottler, where it would become the fizz in a soft drink."

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