18.10.2021

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Energy.Gov: DOE Invests $45 Million to Decarbonize the Natural Gas Power and Industrial Sectors Using Carbon Capture and Storage

"The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $45 million in funding for 12 projects to advance point-source carbon capture and storage technologies that can capture at least 95% of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generated from natural gas power and industrial facilities that produce commodities like cement and steel. These research and development, front-end engineering design and engineering-scale projects are a part of DOE’s efforts to deploy a portfolio of innovative solutions to help achieve the Biden-Harris Administration’s goals of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 and a 100% clean electricity sector by 2035."

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18.10.2021

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Biomass Magazine: Drax to showcase bioenergy with CCS to global investors

"Renewable energy giant Drax is one of just a dozen green companies selected to take part in the government’s Global Investment Summit next week. The event, hosted by the prime minister and the royal family, will showcase the opportunities for investment in the U.K., demonstrating the government’s commitment to building back better following the Covid-19 pandemic and delivering the Ten-Point-Plan set out last year. Drax will showcase its multi-billion-pound innovative negative emissions technology, bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), which permanently removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and will be needed for the U.K. to reach its climate targets cost effectively."

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18.10.2021

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Cision PR Newswire: Carbon Capture and Storage Gathers Momentum in Response to Rising Climate Ambition

"A new climate report released by the Global CCS Institute has highlighted the continuing growth of carbon capture and storage (CCS) worldwide. In 2021, the total capacity of the CCS project-pipeline increased for the fourth year in a row, by almost one third over the previous year. CCS is recognised by experts as an essential element of achieving the world's climate change goals. "

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18.10.2021

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The Guardian: Can Australia’s path to net-zero really be fuelled by carbon capture and LNG?

"More millions for carbon capture, more new coalmines and rising gas consumption for bigger LNG exports are incompatible with Morrison’s claimed net zero urgency."

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18.10.2021

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Blog: Why Orca matters: long-term climate policy and Climeworks’ new direct air capture facility in Iceland (Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy)

"Orca is a baby step toward a larger carbon removal industry that could one day clean up emissions from the hardest-to-abate sectors or, even better, start cleaning up “legacy carbon” that remains in the atmosphere from our past emissions. Without baby steps like Orca, though, we would never get there. In that respect, Orca is a bit like the tiny, 3.5 kilowatt solar power station that NASA’s Lewis Research Center installed on the Papago Indian Reservation in 1978; it’s only the beginning. Global solar power capacity now stands at more than 200 million times the capacity of that little installation. While direct air capture isn’t likely to grow at such a pace, the point is that we shouldn’t judge the potential of an industry by its output in its earliest days."

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18.10.2021

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Podcast: Shall we eclipse the sun? (Spiegel Klimabericht) (German)

German Podcast on Solar Radiation Management

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18.10.2021

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The Hill: Geoengineering: We should not play dice with the planet

"The fate of the Biden administration’s agenda on climate remains uncertain, captive to today’s toxic atmosphere in Washington, DC. But the headlines of 2021 leave little in the way of ambiguity — the era of dangerous climate change is already upon us, in the form of wildfires, hurricanes, droughts and flooding that have upended lives across America. A recent UN report on climate is clear these impacts will worsen in the coming two decades if we fail to halt the continued accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.To avert disaster, we must chart a different climate course, beginning this year, to achieve steep emissions reductions this decade. Meeting this moment demands an all hands-on-deck approach. And no stone should be left unturned in our quest for meaningful options for decarbonizing our economy."

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18.10.2021

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Video: What are 'Nature-based Solutions' to climate change? 'COP Conversations' Series (True Planet)

"Nature-based solutions involve working with nature to address societal challenges, providing benefits for both human well-being and biodiversity. Specifically they are actions that work towards the protection, restoration or management of natural and semi-natural ecosystems; the sustainable management of aquatic systems and working lands such as croplands or timberlands; or the creation of novel ecosystems in and around cities. With us today to talk through the role nature-based solutions can play in tackling climate change, is Nathalie Seddon, Professor of Biodiversity and Director of the Nature-based Solutions Initiative."

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18.10.2021

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Video: Can we remove carbon from the atmosphere? (True Planet)

"There is no ‘magic’ technology to solve climate change, says Professor Cameron Hepburn, Director and Professor of Environmental Economics at Oxford’s Smith School and director of the university’s Economics of Sustainability programme. ‘I wish there were,’ he says. ‘But we have to use all the existing tricks we have in the book as fast as possible to reduce emissions.’ Professor Hepburn emphasises there are some really interesting new technologies – and he thinks we should work to scale these up. In the meantime, he says, we already have some very old technology – the humble tree, which has been doing an important job for millennia – and is making a real contribution to reducing climate change. But Professor Hepburn says that right now, far from rewilding and restoring our ecosystems, we are deforesting and damaging nature with harmful agricultural practices. That needs to change. ‘Used together these various techniques...are going to make quite a big contribution to addressing climate change...what’s stopping us?’ Part of the problem, he says, is that somebody has to pay – and we need to talk about how to achieve that, without relying entirely on the taxpayer. But economics is only part of this, he says. We also need to think about a range of complex issues from politics to equity and beliefs – but, critically, the public needs to be on-board."

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18.10.2021

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Video: Recording: ICRLP 1st Annual Conference: Research Governance for Ocean-based CDR (Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy)

"Ocean-based carbon dioxide removal (CDR) [1] is gaining interest among scientists, policymakers, and entrepreneurs as a strategy for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations to lessen anthropogenic climate change. Nevertheless, key questions remain unanswered about ocean-based CDR technologies, including: what is their additional carbon sequestration potential? How can we measure and verify long-term carbon sequestration? How will implementation impact the human and marine environment, and are these costs worth any proven carbon sequestration benefit? We must answer these questions before we can decide whether ocean-based CDR should be implemented at the gigaton scale. Consequently, responsible research should seek to answer these questions. Nevertheless, an ad hoc and ungoverned research agenda may itself lead to adverse environmental impacts, inequitable outcomes, and undue risk to communities and the ocean, which may subsequently erode social license and generate significant public opposition to ocean-based CDR. [2] We therefore propose a governance framework for ocean-based CDR research. Our framework aims to ensure that research is conducted in a manner that advances promising methods while eliminating excessively risky or unverifiable methods; facilitates public, rightsholder, and stakeholder engagement; and requires investigation of and transparency about risks to the human and marine environment."

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