December 2019

16.12.2019

# Media

0 Comments

New York Times: Our Future Depends on the Arctic

"The race to maintain the Arctic's stabilizing role in the global climate means, in addition, that we need to put geoengineering into the policy mix, despite its hazards, moral or otherwise. This should start with "soft" geoengineering that can be carefully monitored as it is scaling up, and reversed if side effects become too troubling."

LINK


Read more »

16.12.2019

# Media

0 Comments

C2G with Paul Rouse: Could nature ‘solve’ climate change?

"While nature-based solutions vary considerably – you can learn more about their forms in our new evidence and policy briefs – they share one core feature: they seek to enhance the capacity that natural ecosystems already have to remove and store carbon dioxide."

LINK


Read more »

16.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Power, Ian M.; et al. (2020): Prospects for CO2 Mineralization and Enhanced Weathering of Ultramafic Mine Tailings from the Baptiste Nickel Deposit in British Columbia, Canada

Power, Ian M., Gregory M. Dipple, Peter M.D. Bradshaw, and Anna L. Harrison (2020): Prospects for CO2 Mineralization and Enhanced Weathering of Ultramafic Mine Tailings from the Baptiste Nickel Deposit in British Columbia, Canada. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 94 (March): 102895. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.102895.

‌"Experiments were conducted using metallurgical test samples and pulps from cores with the aim of determining the potential for this deposit to sequester CO2 via direct air capture of atmospheric CO2 and carbonation using CO2-rich gas. The experimental direct capture rate was 3.5 kg CO2/m2/yr and would sequester 17 kt CO2/yr based on year-round reaction and when extrapolated to the scale of the proposed tailings facility (5 km2)."

LINK


Read more »

16.12.2019

# Media

0 Comments

The Conversation (David Goldberg): The Earth needs multiple methods for removing CO2 from the air to avert worst of climate change

"In particular, many climate researchers like myself believe government needs to advance technology that will actually suck carbon dioxide out of the air and put it away for very long periods."

LINK


Read more »

16.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Krishnamohan, Krishna-Pillai Sukumara-Pillai; et al. (2019): Climate System Response to Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols: Sensitivity to Altitude of Aerosol Layer

Krishnamohan, Krishna-Pillai Sukumara-Pillai, Govindasamy Bala, Long Cao, Lei Duan, and Ken Caldeira (2019): Climate System Response to Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols: Sensitivity to Altitude of Aerosol Layer. Earth System Dynamics 10 (4): 885–900. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-10-885-2019.

‌"In this study, we isolate and assess the sensitivity of stratospheric aerosol radiative forcing and the resulting climate change to the altitude of the aerosol layer. We study this by prescribing a specified amount of sulfate aerosols, of a size typical of what is produced by volcanoes, distributed uniformly at different levels in the stratosphere. We find that stratospheric sulfate aerosols are more effective in cooling climate when they reside higher in the stratosphere."

LINK


Read more »

13.12.2019

# Calls & events

0 Comments

Call for Abstracts: EGU General Assembly 2020

Deadline: 15. January 2020

"From now, up until 15 January 2020 13:00 CET, you can submit your abstract for the upcoming EGU General Assembly (EGU 2020)."

LINK


Read more »

13.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Xie, Heping; et al. (2019): Low-energy-consumption electrochemical CO2 capture driven by biomimetic phenazine derivatives redox medium

Xie, Heping; Wu, Yifan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Fuhuan; Chen, Bin; Liang, Bin (2019): Low-energy-consumption electrochemical CO2 capture driven by biomimetic phenazine derivatives redox medium. In Applied Energy, p. 114119. DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.114119.

"We develop a low energy consuming, high-capacity CO2-capture cell using a phenazine-based organic as the proton carrier as the PCET redox medium, which has high proton capacity and fast PCET kinetics."

LINK


Read more »

13.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Snyder, Brian (2019): Beyond the social cost of carbon: Negative emission technologies as a means for biophysically setting the price of carbon

Snyder, Brian F. (2019): Beyond the social cost of carbon: Negative emission technologies as a means for biophysically setting the price of carbon. In AMBIO, pp. 1–14. DOI: 10.1007/s13280-019-01301-y.

"Here, we propose that the cost of emerging negative-emission technologies would be an alternative means for setting a carbon price and avoid these philosophical and practical weaknesses."

LINK


Read more »

13.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Klaus, Geraldine; et al. (2019): Psychological factors influencing laypersons’ acceptance of climate engineering, climate change mitigation and business as usual scenarios

Klaus, Geraldine; Ernst, Andreas; Oswald, Lisa (2019): Psychological factors influencing laypersons’ acceptance of climate engineering, climate change mitigation and business as usual scenarios. In Technology in Society, p. 101222. DOI: 10.1016/j.techsoc.2019.101222.

"In July 2017, we assessed public reactions from the German population in a representative online survey. Participants were given a brief text informing them about climate change and one of four different scenarios in a between-subject design (N = 678). Two of the scenarios described the use of climate engineering technologies - stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) and bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) - one of them covered conventional mitigation strategies and the fourth group was given an outline of the business-as-usual (BAU) approach."

LINK


Read more »

13.12.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Fabre, Adrien; Wagner, Gernot (2019): Risky Geoengineering Option Can Make An Ambitious Climate Mitigation Agreement More Likely

Fabre, Adrien; Wagner, Gernot (2019): Risky Geoengineering Option Can Make An Ambitious Climate Mitigation Agreement More Likely, NYU Wagner Research Paper Forthcoming, 12/9/2019.

"Some countries prefer high to low mitigation (H > L). Some prefer low to high (L > H). That fundamental disagreement is at the heart of the seeming intractability of negotiating a climate mitigation agreement. Enter geoengineering (G). Its risky and imperfect nature makes it arguably inferior to any country’s preferred mitigation outcome. However, absent a global high-mitigation agreement, countries facing disastrous climate damages might indeed wish to undertake it, effectively ranking H > G > L."

LINK


Read more »