November 2019

11.11.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Maxwell, S. L.; et al. (2019): Degradation and Forgone Removals Increase the Carbon Impact of Intact Forest Loss by 626%

Maxwell, Sean L., Tom Evans, James E. M. Watson, Alexandra Morel, Hedley Grantham, Adam Duncan, Nancy Harris, et al. 2019. “Degradation and Forgone Removals Increase the Carbon Impact of Intact Forest Loss by 626%.” Science Advances 5 (10): eaax2546. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aax2546.

"We show that between 2000 and 2013, direct clearance of intact tropical forest areas accounted for 3.2% of gross carbon emissions from all deforestation across the pantropics. However, full carbon accounting requires the consideration of forgone carbon sequestration, selective logging, edge effects, and defaunation. When these factors were considered, the net carbon impact resulting from intact tropical forest loss between 2000 and 2013 increased by a factor of 6 (626%), from 0.34 (0.37 to 0.21) to 2.12 (2.85 to 1.00) petagrams of carbon (equivalent to approximately 2 years of global land use change emissions)."

LINK


Read more »

11.11.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Hepburn, C.; et al. (2019): The Technological and Economic Prospects for CO2 Utilization and Removal

Hepburn, Cameron, Ella Adlen, John Beddington, Emily A. Carter, Sabine Fuss, Niall Mac Dowell, Jan C. Minx, Pete Smith, and Charlotte K. Williams. 2019. “The Technological and Economic Prospects for CO2 Utilization and Removal.” Nature 575 (7781): 87–97. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1681-6.

‌"Here we review ten pathways for the utilization of carbon dioxide. Pathways that involve chemicals, fuels and microalgae might reduce emissions of carbon dioxide but have limited potential for its removal, whereas pathways that involve construction materials can both utilize and remove carbon dioxide. Land-based pathways can increase agricultural output and remove carbon dioxide. Our assessment suggests that each pathway could scale to over 0.5 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide utilization annually."

LINK


Read more »

11.11.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Gambardella, S. (2019): The Stormy Emergence of Geoengineering in the International Law of the Sea

Gambardella, S. 2019. “The Stormy Emergence of Geoengineering in the International Law of the Sea.” Carbon & Climate Law Review 13 (2): 122–29. https://doi.org/10.21552/cclr/2019/2/7.

‌"This study aims to look at the role that international environmental law could or should play in the development of geoengineering. The discussions that have taken place on geoengineering in international fora are rich in lessons about these rights themselves and with regard to their effectiveness and efficiency. Thus, questions of ‘good governance’ emerge. It is therefore a question of presenting the various possibilities offered by international law to frame - even forbid - these new practices."

LINK


Read more »

08.11.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Gryspeerdt, Edward; et al. (2019): The impact of ship emission controls recorded by cloud properties

Gryspeerdt, Edward; Smith, Tristan; O'Keeffe, Eoin; Christensen, Matthew; Goldsworth, Fraser (2019): The impact of ship emission controls recorded by cloud properties. In Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI: 10.1029/2019GL084700.

"This work uses over 17,000 shiptracks during the implementation of fuel sulfur content regulations to demonstrate the central role of sulfate aerosol in ship exhaust for modifying clouds. By connecting individual shiptracks to transponder data, it is shown that almost half of shiptracks are likely undetected, masking a significant contribution to the climate impact of shipping. A pathway to retrieving ship sulfate emissions is demonstrated, showing how cloud observations could be used to monitor air pollution."

LINK


Read more »

08.11.2019

# Media

0 Comments

Phys.org: Carbon dioxide capture and use could become big business

"Capturing carbon dioxide and turning it into commercial products, such as fuels or construction materials, could become a new global industry, according to a study by researchers from UCLA, the University of Oxford and five other institutions."

LINK


Read more »

08.11.2019

# Calls & events

0 Comments

Call for Attendance: Virtual Conference: Greenhouse Gas Removal and Civil Society

30 November 2019

"A global conference aiming to listen to differing perspectives on greenhouse gas removal technologies and techniques from within civil society with a particular focus on  the youth, indigenous groups and other frontline communities. As these technologies and techniques are increasingly relied on, it is of vital importance the voices of civil society and those communities most affected are heard, and the diverse range of views and opinions are appreciated."

LINK


Read more »

08.11.2019

# New Publications

0 Comments

Kaplan, Leah; et al. (2019): Cooling a Warming Planet? Public Forums on limate Intervention Research

Kaplan, Leah; Nelson, John; Tomblin, David; Farooque, Mahmud; Lloyd, Jason; Neff, Mark et al. (2019): "Cooling a Warming Planet? Public Forums on limate Intervention Research." ASU Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes. Washington, DC. Available online at https://cspo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/SRM_book_EPUB.pdf.

"CSPO and its partners, including the Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology (ECAST) network and the ASU-based PlanetWorks initiative, used participatory technology assessment (pTA), a method of determining public values and opinions to help inform up-stream decision-making, as an instrument to elicit views on the governance of SRM research. After an iterative design process with both technical experts and members of the lay public, CSPO hosted two day-long public deliberations on the governance of SRM research in Boston and Phoenix in September 2018."

LINK


Read more »

06.11.2019

# Media

0 Comments

Mail & Guardian: The trouble with indiscriminate tree-planting in Africa

"The idea that the world needs to plant more trees is not controversial. Trees suck carbon out of the atmosphere, storing it in the earth instead. So if we plant enough new forests — these would need to cover as much as one-third of all the land in the world, some estimates suggest — we should be able to prevent the planet from becoming any hotter."

LINK


Read more »

06.11.2019

# Media

0 Comments

Grist: Investors are betting billions on carbontech. Will it pay off?

"Technologies that capture, reuse, or lock away carbon dioxide have long seemed more like science fiction than viable ventures: Buildings that trap waste gases in their concrete bricks. Meatless burgers and fruits and vegetables enriched with captured carbon. But as more pilot tests begin, and amid growing urgency to take action on climate change, investors are increasingly placing their bets on so-called “carbontech.”"

LINK


Read more »

06.11.2019

# Media

0 Comments

UC Santa Cruz Newscenter: Climate engineering: International meeting reveals tensions

"At this point, the greatest danger of climate engineering may be how little is known about where countries stand on these potentially planet-altering technologies. Who is moving forward? Who is funding research? And who is being left out of the conversation?"

LINK


Read more »