January 2019

30.01.2019

# Media

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Helmholtz: Climate Engineering: "Decades might pass." (German)

German article on CE

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28.01.2019

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 05 of 2019

The newsletter of calendar week 05 in 2019 is now available here.


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28.01.2019

# Media

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Grist: For geoengineers, a scientific existential crisis

"In mid-December, more than 28,000 people met in Washington, D.C., to discuss everything earth science-related at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. But amid the dry data and scientific acronyms at a session on solar geoengineering, the science had a patina of existentialist dread that you might not see in a similar forum. There were questions of public disclosure, talk of slippery slopes, and an inescapable nervousness, as if maybe this subject was only barely sitting on the respectable side of science."

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28.01.2019

# Media

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Red Green and Blue: GreenFaith vs Geoengineering: Are we prepared to play God in dealing with climate change?

"As policymakers face the magnitude of the 1.5-degree challenge, new technologies and approaches for capping temperature increases – referred to as climate engineering or geoengineering – are under growing discussion."

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28.01.2019

# Media

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AllAfrica: South Africa: Superfreak Pivot - When Climate Engineering Came to South Africa

"Cooling the earth by blocking out the sun, although potentially disastrous, is now a feasible answer to climate change. As a Harvard research paper published late last year proved, solar geo-engineering is both technically feasible and relatively cheap. With governments and international bodies considering the technology, a South African university has just announced a study. But how convenient is this answer for our politicians and heavy emitters?"

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28.01.2019

# Media

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Nexus Media: Scientists Call for Artificial Trees to Fight Climate Change

"Plants are humanity’s greatest ally in the fight against climate change. Plants soak up carbon dioxide and turn it into leaves and branches. The more trees humans plant, the less heat-trapping carbon pollution in the air. Unfortunately, plants require a lot of water and land, so much that humans might need to find a new ally to help draw down all that carbon. New research from a team of German scientists suggests that artificial photosynthesis could help. Scientists are urging the world to invest in the technology, which remains too costly to be practical."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Miocic, J.; et al. (2019): 420,000 year assessment of fault leakage rates shows geological carbon storage is secure

Miocic, J.; Gilfillan, S.; Frank, N.; Schroeder-Ritzrau, A.; Burnside, N.; Haszeldine, S. (2019): 420,000 year assessment of fault leakage rates shows geological carbon storage is secure. In: Scientific reports 9 (1), S. 769. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-36974-0.

"Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology is routinely cited as a cost effective tool for climate change mitigation. CCS can directly reduce industrial CO2 emissions and is essential for the retention of CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. To be effective as a climate change mitigation tool, CO2 must be securely retained for 10,000 years (10 ka) with a leakage rate of below 0.01% per year of the total amount of CO2 injected. Migration of CO2 back to the atmosphere via leakage through geological faults is a potential high impact risk to CO2 storage integrity."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Zhao, R.; et al. (2019): Thermodynamic exploration of temperature vacuum swing adsorption for direct air capture of carbon dioxide in buildings

Zhao, R.; Liu, L.; Zhao, L.; Deng, S.; Li, S.; Zhang, Y.; Li, H. (2019): Thermodynamic exploration of temperature vacuum swing adsorption for direct air capture of carbon dioxide in buildings. In: Energy Conversion and Management 183, S. 418–426. DOI: 10.1016/j.enconman.2019.01.009.

"Abrupt climate change such as the loss of Arctic sea-ice area urgently needs negative emissions technologies. The potential application of direct air capture of carbon dioxide from indoor air and outdoor air in closed buildings or crowded places has been discussed in this paper. From the aspects of carbon reduction and indoor comfort, the ventilation system integrating a capture device is of great value in practical use."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Green, J.; et al. (2019): Large influence of soil moisture on long-term terrestrial carbon uptake

Green, J.; Seneviratne, S.; Berg, A.; Findell, K.; Hagemann, S.; Lawrence, D..; Gentine, P. (2019): Large influence of soil moisture on long-term terrestrial carbon uptake. In: Nature 565 (7740), S. 476–479. DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0848-x.

"Although the terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 25 per cent of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the rate of land carbon uptake remains highly uncertain, leading to uncertainties in climate projections1,2. Understanding the factors that limit or drive land carbon storage is therefore important for improving climate predictions. [...] Our results emphasize that the capacity of continents to act as a future carbon sink critically depends on the nonlinear response of carbon fluxes to soil moisture and on land–atmosphere interactions. This suggests that the increasing trend in carbon uptake rate may not be sustained past the middle of the century and could result in accelerated atmospheric CO2 growth."

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28.01.2019

# Calls & events

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Call of Letters of Inquiry: NET-ZERO AND NEGATIVE EMISSIONS TECHNOLOGIES

Deadline: 1. April 2019

"The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has established a new, dedicated component within its Energy and Environment program focused on supporting energy and environmental science. The Foundation is currently soliciting Letters of Inquiry for innovative, collaborative academic research projects led by early- and mid-career scholars that examine net-zero interventions and negative emissions technologies in the United States."

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