April 2018

13.04.2018

# Media

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Earther: Chemtrails Aren't the Geoengineering Debate We Should Be Having (Because They Aren't Real)

"There’s a serious debate worth having, both on the science and technology itself and on the societal and policy implications. Unfortunately, in some corners of society valid concerns over the impacts of solar engineering have been overtaken by a different set of fears—various versions of the so-called chemtrails conspiracy theory. "

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13.04.2018

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Saving Our World: How a last-ditch ‘planet-hacking’ plan could keep Earth habitable for longer

"The world is unlikely to hit the targets necessary to avoid catastrophic levels of climate change. Some think that as a last resort, we may need to temporarily cool the planet by modifying the skies. It wouldn’t solve the problem, but it might buy us time. This technology, called solar geoengineering, is so controversial that some experts think it could lead to global war. But just in case, a team of researchers at Harvard is planning to conduct one of the first outdoor geoengineering experiments."

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12.04.2018

# Calls & events

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Job: PhD position on environmental analysis of advanced biofuels (Norway)

Deadline: 25. April 2018

"However, biofuel systems are intrinsically complex, and their climate benefits are to be assessed on a case specific basis. Biofuel production systems are strictly connected to land management and land cover changes, thereby involving changes in a suite of biophysical mechanisms like surface energy fluxes and water balances that are strictly coupled to local temperature and precipitation changes. Further, climate impact analysis are seldom integrated with other sustainability indicators (e.g., the UN Sustainable Development Goals), and holistic approaches are essential to discern the interlinkages of the land-climate-energy nexus and guide future sustainable transitions."

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10.04.2018

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 15 of 2018

The newsletter of calendar week 15 in 2018 is now available here.


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10.04.2018

# Political Papers

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Lempert, Robert J.; et al. (2018): Is Climate Restoration an Appropriate Climate Policy Goal?

Lempert, Robert J.; Marangoni, Giacomo; Keller, Klaus; Duke, Jessica (2018): Is Climate Restoration an Appropriate Climate Policy Goal? RAND Corporation (RR-2442-RC).

"This report offers an initial exploration of the concept of climate restoration — that is, approaches that seek to return atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases to preindustrial levels within one to two generations. Using a simple integrated assessment model, the analysis examines climate restoration through the lens of risk management under conditions of deep uncertainty, exploring the technology, economic, and policy conditions under which it might be possible to achieve various climate restoration goals and the conditions under which society might be better off with (rather than without) a climate restoration goal. This report also explores near-term actions that might help manage the risks of climate restoration."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Clean Technica: International Geoengineering Rules Are Urgently Needed, Researchers Argue

"As talk of geoengineering as a possible partial solution to anthropogenic climate change has grown over recent times, it has become an urgent need that there is a set of international rules put into place to govern such activities, some of those involved in the sector have begun arguing."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Carbon News: Solar geoengineering ‘still too uncertain’

"THE WORLD must urgently agree controls on solar geoengineering to weigh up its possible risks and benefits before deciding to go ahead, one expert says."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Yale Environment 360: Why Green Groups Are Split on Subsidizing Carbon Capture Technology

"Environmentalists are divided over a provision in the recently approved U.S. budget that increases tax credits for projects that capture and store CO2. Critics say new subsidies for “enhanced oil recovery” included in the budget bill would simply encourage companies to pump more oil."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Phys.org: New research gives precise look at underground CO2 abatement process

"Environmental scientists trying to mitigate the effects of CO2 have experimented with injecting it deep underground, where it becomes trapped. These trials have mainly taken place in sandstone aquifers, however, the injected CO2 primarily remains present as a bubble that can return to the surface if is there are fracture in the capping formation. A different approach using flows as injection sites—chiefly at the CarbFix site in Iceland and in Washington state—has yielded dramatic results. Metals in basalt have the ability to transform CO2 into a solid inert mineral in a matter of months. While the new method holds promise, the underground injections can be imprecise, difficult to track and measure."

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10.04.2018

# New Publications

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Lenton, Andrew; et al. (2018): Assessing carbon dioxide removal through global and regional ocean alkalinization under high and low emission pathways

Lenton, Andrew; Matear, Richard J.; Keller, David P.; Scott, Vivian; Vaughan, Naomi E. (2018): Assessing carbon dioxide removal through global and regional ocean alkalinization under high and low emission pathways. In Earth Syst. Dynam. 9 (2), pp. 339–357. DOI: 10.5194/esd-9-339-2018.

"Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) is capable of reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and surface warming and addressing ocean acidification. Here, we simulate global and regional responses to alkalinity (ALK) addition (0.25 PmolALK yr−1) over the period 2020–2100 using the CSIRO-Mk3L-COAL Earth System Model, under high (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5; RCP8.5) and low (RCP2.6) emissions. While regionally there are large changes in alkalinity associated with locations of AOA, globally we see only a very weak dependence on where and when AOA is applied. "

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