March 2018

15.03.2018

# Media

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Yahoo News: Could plan to ‘reverse climate change’ by spraying aerosols into the atmosphere actually work?

"Study co-author Peter Irvine of Harvard said, ‘Most studies so far have focused on the extremes, like in a large-scale deployment that’s ended instantly and permanently. ‘If solar geoengineering were deployed at small scales, say cooling only a few tenths of a degree Celsius, then if it were ended there wouldn’t be substantial warming."

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15.03.2018

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Phys.org: Setting expectations for negative-emission systems in U.S. to protect climate

"Nearly every major plan to limit the damage from climate change relies in part on combining bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, a technology in early development known as "BECCS." Feedstock plants would grow by absorbing carbon dioxide from the air, and the carbon-dioxide generated from burning the biomass to produce electricity would be captured and permanently stored underground. Producing electricity that actually reduces CO2 has obvious appeal."

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15.03.2018

# Media

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Earther: Can We Make Sure Geoengineering Doesn't Backfire?

"Not necessarily, they say. Writing this week in Earth’s Future, Andy Parker of the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Postdam, Germany, and Peter Irvine of Harvard’s engineering school note that there’s been little consideration of how likely a so-called “termination shock” really is. They argue that any future solar geoengineering projects need to be geared toward reducing the risk of such a catastrophe as much as possible."

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15.03.2018

# Media

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RNZ: Science fiction-like proposal to help combat global warming

"Filtering out a portion of sunlight from entering the Earth's atmosphere is being explored as a way of reducing some of the impacts of climate change. It's a theoretical proposal known as Solar Radiation Management or SRM, and is referred to as solar geo-engineering, climate engineering and climate intervention."

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15.03.2018

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Euractiv: Scientists inject new sense of urgency into CCS

"Prof. Norton was speaking at the Brussels launch of a new report by EASAC, which looks at the role “negative emission technologies” – or NETs – can play in meeting the Paris Agreement target of limiting global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius. NETs such as afforestation and reforestation, ocean fertilisation, or direct air capture and carbon storage (DACCs), are seen as last resort options to address climate change by directly removing CO2 from the atmosphere."

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14.03.2018

# New Publications

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Baik, Ejeong; et al. (2018): Geospatial analysis of near-term potential for carbon-negative bioenergy in the United States

Baik, Ejeong; Sanchez, Daniel L.; Turner, Peter A.; Mach, Katharine J.; Field, Christopher B.; Benson, Sally M. (2018): Geospatial analysis of near-term potential for carbon-negative bioenergy in the United States. In PNAS 100, p. 201720338. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1720338115.

"This study leverages biomass production data and site-specific injection and storage capacity estimates at high spatial resolution to assess the near-term deployment opportunities for BECCS in the United States. If the total biomass resource available in the United States was mobilized for BECCS, an estimated 370 Mt CO2⋅y−1 of negative emissions could be supplied in 2020."

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14.03.2018

# Media

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Daily Mail: Controversial plan to artificially cool the planet by firing aerosols into the atmosphere might NOT be as risky as thought, experts claim

"As the world grapples with different strategies to mitigate the warming climate, few have sparked such controversy in recent times as solar geoengineering. The proposed plan would use aerosols, fired into the stratosphere with high-flying aircraft, to cool the planet by blocking radiation from the sun. It would essentially mimic the effects seen after volcanic eruptions – but, an analysis published at the beginning of this year warned that the approach could have grave consequences."

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14.03.2018

# Media

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E&E News: Models assume we'll cover Earth in trees. That's a problem

"The farmland of central Illinois might rarely be at the forefront of controversial climate action — but its moment arrived last spring when a Decatur-based ethanol plant became one of the first of its kind to launch an ambitious strategy to combat global warming. It combines the production of biofuel with a special technology designed to capture the facility's carbon dioxide emissions. It's a fledgling version of a much bigger geoengineering strategy that some experts hope could reduce global emissions by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It's known as "negative emissions.""

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12.03.2018

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 11 of 2018

The newsletter of calendar week 11 in 2018 is now available here.


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12.03.2018

# New Publications

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Svoboda, Toby; et al. (2018): Climate engineering and human rights

Svoboda, Toby; Buck, Holly Jean; Suarez, Pablo (2018): Climate engineering and human rights. In Environmental Politics 366 (1), pp. 1–20. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1448575.

"In this Forum, three scholars discuss how climate engineering will pose novel human rights challenges, and may well force reconsideration of how human rights are applied as a guide to action. Following a short introduction, the first section introduces three competing approaches to human rights, arguing views which emphasize fairness or attempt to maximize satisfaction are more promising than one viewing human rights as inviolable ‘side-constraints’. The second section draws lessons from climate migration that relevant for climate engineering in terms of incorporating a human rights approach to duties, rights, and participation."

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