February 2018

14.02.2018

# Media

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Tagesspiegel: An inconvenient truth - and many questions

A German newspaper opinion article by reserachers from Kiel (SPP).

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12.02.2018

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 07 of 2018

The newsletter of calendar week 07 in 2018 is now available here.


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12.02.2018

# New Publications

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Johannessen, Sophia C.; Macdonald, Robie W. (2018): Reply to Macreadie et al Comment on ‘Geoengineering with seagrasses. Is credit due where credit is given?’

Johannessen, Sophia C.; Macdonald, Robie W. (2018): Reply to Macreadie et al Comment on ‘Geoengineering with seagrasses. Is credit due where credit is given?’. In Environ. Res. Lett. 13 (2), p. 28001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aaa7b5.

"Macreadie et al (this issue; M2017 Environ. Res. Lett.) challenged the conclusion presented by Johannessen and Macdonald (2016  Environ. Res. Lett.) that global estimates of carbon sequestration by seagrass meadows were too high. Here we clarify our global calculation, respond to M2017's criticisms and explain how the persistent misunderstandings about sediment dynamics within the Blue Carbon community continue to lead to overestimates of carbon sequestration in seagrass meadows. "

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12.02.2018

# New Publications

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Macreadie, Peter I.; et al. (2018): Comment on ‘Geoengineering with seagrasses. Is credit due where credit is given?’

Macreadie, Peter I.; Ewers-Lewis, Carolyn J.; Whitt, Ashley A.; Ollivier, Quinn; Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M.; Carnell, Paul; Serrano, Oscar (2018): Comment on ‘Geoengineering with seagrasses. Is credit due where credit is given?’. In Environ. Res. Lett. 13 (2), p. 28002. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aaa7ad.

"Here we would like to clarify some of the questions raised by Johannessen and Macdonald (2016), with the aim to promote discussion within the scientific community about the evidence for carbon sequestration by seagrasses with a view to awarding carbon credits."

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12.02.2018

# Media

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Bloomberg: How Geoengineering Can Help Fight Global Warming

Video interview. "Dr. Antonio Busalacchi, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research president, discusses the science of geoengineering and how it can be used to combat climate change. He speaks with Bloomberg's Cory Johnson on "Bloomberg Technology.""

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12.02.2018

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Independent: Coral reefs require ‘radical interventions’ to save them from destruction, say top marine scientists

"Scientists are 'ready to take risks' in effort to save vital marine ecosystems"

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10.02.2018

# New Publications

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Jones, Anthony C.; et al. (2018): Regional climate impacts of stabilizing global warming at 1.5 K using solar geoengineering

Jones, Anthony C.; Hawcroft, Matthew K.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy; Guo, Xiaoran; Moore, John C. (2018): Regional climate impacts of stabilizing global warming at 1.5 K using solar geoengineering. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000720.

"In this study, we use a global climate model to investigate the climatic impacts of using solar geoengineering by stratospheric aerosol injection to stabilize global-mean temperature at 1.5 K for the duration of the 21st century against 3 scenarios spanning the range of plausible greenhouse gas mitigation pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP8.5)."

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10.02.2018

# Media

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Grist: Wizards and prophets face off to save the planet

"I think this is a really important subject and one that doesn’t get enough attention. So far I’ve been pretty factual but here I’d like to give you my opinion: Even though we’ve made great progress on carbon emissions, I think it may not be fast enough. So what do you do? That’s where geoengineering comes in. Wizards and prophets have different forms of it."

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10.02.2018

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Anthropocene Magazine: Here’s what localized geoengineering might look like

"If we retrofit our cities and change the way we farm, we could deflect the sun’s heat to dramatically reduce temperature extremes, a Nature Geoscience study finds. By adding white roofs and reflective pavements in cities, planting crops whose leaves reflect the sun more, and reducing tilling in agricultural areas, we could see global temperatures dipping by an estimated 0.7 °C. And at regional scales, those reductions are much more dramatic: across individual continents, smarter land use would reduce daily temperature extremes by up to 3 °C."

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08.02.2018

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Grist: Devil’s Bargain

"We already have planet-cooling technology. The problem is, it’s killing us."

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