October 2016

09.10.2016

# New Publications

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Fairbrother, Malcolm (2016): Geoengineering, moral hazard, and trust in climate science. Evidence from a survey experiment in Britain

Fairbrother, Malcolm (2016): Geoengineering, moral hazard, and trust in climate science. Evidence from a survey experiment in Britain. In Climatic Change. DOI 10.1007/s10584-016-1818-7.

"This paper presents the results of survey experiments testing whether hearing about solar radiation management (SRM) affects people’s support for taxing polluting energy and/or their trust in climate science. For a nationally representative sample of respondents in Britain, I found that receiving a brief introduction to SRM had no impact on most people’s willingness to pay taxes, nor on their trust in climate science."

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09.10.2016

# Media

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Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: ‘We’d have to finish one new facility every working day for the next 70 years’—Why carbon capture is no panacea

"As a matter of fact, of the 400 IPCC scenarios that keep warming below the Paris agreement target, 344 involve the deployment of negative emissions technologies, wrote Kevin Anderson in Nature Geoscience. But is carbon capture and sequestration ready for prime time? Will CCS technology work on a large scale? How expensive is it, how practical, and how soon can it be deployed?"

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09.10.2016

# Media

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New Scientist: Let’s harness synthetic biology to fix our broken planet

"If we want to reverse desertification, synthetic bacteria are one of the safer geoengineering options, says biologist."

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09.10.2016

# Media

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Kurzweil: Converting atmospheric carbon dioxide into carbon nanotubes for use in batteries

"The electric vehicle of the future will be carbon negative (reducing the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide) not just carbon neutral (not adding CO2 to the atmosphere), say researchers at Vanderbilt University and George Washington University (GWU). The trick: replace graphite electrodes in lithium-ion batteries (used in electric vehicles) with carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers recovered from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The new technology could also be used in sodium-ion batteries, currently under development for large-scale applications, such as the electric grid."

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06.10.2016

# New Publications

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Burns, Elizabeth T.; et al. (2016): What do people think when they think about solar geoengineering? A review of empirical social science literature, and prospects for future reseach

Burns, Elizabeth T.; Flegal, Jane A.; Keith, David W.; Mahajan, Aseem; Tingley, Dustin; Wagner, Gernot (2016): What do people think when they think about solar geoengineering? A review of empirical social science literature, and prospects for future research. In Earth’s Future, n/a‐n/a. DOI 10.1002/2016EF000461.

"In reflecting on the past decade of research, we review around thirty studies investigating public familiarity with, and views about, solar geoengineering. A number of recurring patterns emerge: (1) general unfamiliarity with geoengineering among publics; (2) the importance of artifice versus naturalness; (3) some conditional support for certain kinds of research; and (4) nuanced findings on the ‘moral hazard’ and ‘reverse moral hazard’ hypotheses, with empirical support for each appearing under different circumstances and populations."

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06.10.2016

# Media

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Vox: No country on Earth is taking the 2 degree climate target seriously

"BECCS — raising, harvesting, and burning biomass for energy, while capturing and burying the carbon emissions — is unproven at scale. Thus far, most demonstration plants of any size attaching CCS to fossil fuel facilities have been over-budget disasters. What if we can’t rely on it? What if it never pans out?"

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06.10.2016

# Media

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Inside Climate News: Removing CO2 From the Air Only Hope for Fixing Climate Change, New Study Says

Media response to Hansen, James E.; et al. (2016): Young People's Burden. "Without 'negative emissions' to help return atmospheric CO2 to 350 ppm, future generations could face costs that 'may become too heavy to bear,' paper says."

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06.10.2016

# New Publications

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Gabriel, Corey J.; et al. (2016): The G4Foam Experiment. Global Climate Impacts of Regional Ocean Albedo Modification

Gabriel, Corey J.; Robock, Alan; Xia, Lili; Zambri, Brian (2016): The G4Foam Experiment. Global Climate Impacts of Regional Ocean Albedo Modification. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., pp. 1–30. DOI 10.5194/acp-2016-849.

"Here we present the results of climate model simulations of a unique Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Testbed experiment to investigate the benefits and risks of a scheme that would brighten certain oceanic regions. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CESM-CAM4-CHEM global climate model was modified to simulate a scheme in which the albedo of the ocean surface is raised over the subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere. Like the commonly studied stratospheric geoengineering and marine cloud brightening proposals, this ocean albedo modification scheme is not currently possible. However, a stable, nondispersive foam, comprised of tiny, highly reflective microbubbles has been developed under idealized conditions, and, hence, a geoengineering scheme which simulates the effects of large-scale deployment of these microbubbles is appropriate to study at this time."

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06.10.2016

# Media

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Wired: To Help Cool the Climate, Add Aerosol

By David Keith and Gernot Wagner. "Aerosols, the fine particles in air pollution, reflect a small portion of sunlight back into space and, thus, actually help keep global warming in check. That’s true despite the carbon dioxide emissions coming from the same smokestacks that warm the planet."

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04.10.2016

# Media

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Center for Carbon Removal: Carbon removal and the next frontier of corporate climate action: early opportunities (Part 2 of 2)

"This is the second post in a two-part blog series on carbon removal and corporate climate action. Part 1 explored the responsibility of businesses to clean up CO2 from the atmosphere; this post explores the business case for action on carbon removal today."

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