April 2016

13.04.2016

# New Publications

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Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C.M. (2016): Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae. Negative carbon dioxide emission path

Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C.M. (2016): Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae. Negative carbon dioxide emission path. In Bioresource Technology. DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2016.03.060.

"Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures."

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13.04.2016

# Media

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Center for Carbon Removal: Expert Dialogue: Should we be pursuing strategies to remove non-CO2 greenhouse gases from the air?

"Dr. Renaud de Richter from Montpellier, France recently reached out to the Center for Carbon Removal with an interesting question: “would the Center consider activities related to "greenhouse gas (GHG) removal" beyond the main most prevalent GHG, CO2?" An email exchanged ensued, which I have lightly edited and published below."

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13.04.2016

# Media

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JLL International: The Costs of Geoengineering in Manipulating Climate Change in the Unforeseen Future

"This examination serves to analyze the use of carbon dioxide removal and solar radiation management as two methods of alleviating climate change. This analysis will feature how successful existing technologies are at handling climate change as well as identifying what benefits and detriments each technology has introduced us to the world."

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13.04.2016

# New Publications

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Hubbard, Matthew (2016): Barometer Rising: The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety as a Model For Holistic International Regulation of Ocean Fertilization Projects and Other Forms of Geoengineering

Hubbard, Matthew (2016): Barometer Rising: The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety as a Model For Holistic International Regulation of Ocean Fertilization Projects and Other Forms of Geoengineering. In William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review 40 (2), pp. 591–621.

"This Note argues that there is a strong comparison between biotechnology and geoengineering, and that the current regulatory framework for biosafety can serve as a model for similar regulation of ocean fertilization."

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13.04.2016

# New Publications

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Modak, Angshuman; et al. (2016): Why must a solar forcing be larger than a CO 2 forcing to cause the same global mean surface temperature change?

Modak, Angshuman; Bala, Govindasamy; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken (2016): Why must a solar forcing be larger than a CO 2 forcing to cause the same global mean surface temperature change? In Environ. Res. Lett. 11 (4), p. 44013–44013. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/11/4/044013.

"In this study, we investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for the lower efficacy of solar forcing compared to an equivalent CO2 forcing. Radiative forcing is estimated using the Gregory method that regresses top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux against the change in global mean surface temperature. For a 2.25% increase in solar irradiance that produces the same long term global mean warming as a doubling of CO2 concentration, we estimate that the efficacy of solar forcing is ~80% relative to CO2 forcing in the NCAR CAM5 climate model."

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13.04.2016

# New Publications

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Böttcher, Miranda; et al. (2016): Solar Radiation Management: Foresight for Governance

Böttcher, Miranda; Gabriel, Johannes; Low, Sean (2016): Solar Radiation Management: Foresight for Governance. Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS). Potsdam (IASS Working Paper).

"SRM4G, conducted in three workshops over the course of 2015, sought to design and test an interdisciplinary,
participatory, and structured communication platform to enable future-oriented deliberations on the governance challenges facing the research and development of SRM technologies."

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13.04.2016

# Media

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Geoengineering Monitor: Vultures are circling after Paris agreement: the carbon dioxide removal sector wants more funding

"The report, armed with the belief that first the IPCC and now the Paris Agreement have turned CDR and negative emissions technologies into an international imperative, aims to make it clearer to philanthropies what CRD proposals are available to be funded, and where future funding could be aimed to make an impact. The report is revealing – though not necessarily for the reasons that its authors claim."

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13.04.2016

# Media

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Carbon Brief: In-depth: Experts assess the feasibility of ‘negative emissions’

"To limit climate change to “well below 2C”, as nations agreed to do in Paris last December, modelling shows it is likely that removing carbon dioxide emissions from the atmosphere later on this century will be necessary.
Scientists have imagined a range of “negative emissions” technologies, or NETs, that could do just that, as explained by Carbon Brief yesterday. But are any of them realistic in practice?"

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13.04.2016

# New Publications

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Katz, Eric; Hargrove, Eugene C. (2015): Geoengineering, Restoration, and the Construction of Nature

Katz, Eric; Hargrove, Eugene C. (2015): Geoengineering, Restoration, and the Construction of Nature. In Environmental Ethics 37 (4), pp. 485–498. DOI 10.5840/enviroethics201537444.

"My argument is based on my critique of the process of ecological restoration as the creation of an artifactual reality. When humanity intentionally interferes with the processes and entities of nature, we change the ontological reality of the natural world. The world becomes a garden, or a zoo, an environment that must be continually managed to meet the goals of human purposes."

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13.04.2016

# Projects

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ARPA-E: Rhizosphere Observations Optimizing Terrestrial Sequestration (ROOTS)

"Improving the ability for plants to store carbon in the soil has the potential to significantly reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. The ROOTS program is making up to $30 million in funding available to pursue technologies that develop new crop breeding approaches for improved root and soil function that will help plants to store more carbon in the ground and take up nutrients and water more efficiently."

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